Square Chevrons Quilt Pattern

Square Chevrons Quilt

Square Chevrons Quilt

The Square Chevrons quilt is made using one of the most simple quilt block combinations – a four patch unit and a half square triangle unit.  You can find this combination in many blocks – sunny lanes, jewel box and buckeye beautiful to name a few.  I’ve used batik fabrics and teamed them with white instead of the black that I often use with batiks.  The quilt overall places the white stripes as chevrons, but the resulting design contains squares (hence the name), roadways and even stars when you look carefully.

I’ve used nine 16″ finished size blocks and the quilt size is 52″ square, using 3/4 yard each of dark blue and light blue for the four patch units with 1.1/2 yards of brown batik and 1.1/4 yards of white for the half square triangles and the border.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the square chevrons quilt

Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

2.1/2″ squares:  one hundred and forty four each in dark blue and light blue – but these can be strip pieced which saves a lot of time

4.7/8″ squares:  thirty six brown, thirty six white

For the border you will need five 2.1/2″ strips of brown cut across the width of fabric

Making the half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Use the 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a brown and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 4.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the brown and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Sew together strips of fabric

Sew together strips of fabric

Making the four patch units

Cut nine 2.1/2″ strips in both the dark blue and the light blue fabrics.  Sew each light blue strip to a dark blue strip along the length.  Cut the resulting panels at 2.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 2.1/2″ by 4.1/2″.  Two of these sewn together will form a four patch unit as shown in the top right of the photo.

This is much quicker than sewing together individual squares!

Making the quilt block

Quilt block layout

Quilt block layout

Lay the squares out as shown.  There’s a four patch unit in each corner and four of them in the middle.  These are all placed so that the dark blue squares run from top right to bottom left.

I haven’t actually sewn together the pairs of squares to make 4 patch units in this photo, but this needs to be done before the rest of the block can be sewn together.

There’s a pair of half square triangle units between each pair of corners.  These are all placed so that the white triangles combine to form a stripe running from top left to bottom right.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows together to complete the block.  You need to make nine of these.

Rows 1 and 3

Rows 1 and 3

Assembling the square chevrons quilt

Lay the blocks out in three rows of three.  Rows one and three are the same as each other:  the white stripes run from top left to bottom right at each end of the row while in the middle block they run from bottom left to top right.

Row 2

Row 2

In the middle row the blocks are placed so that the white stripe runs from bottom left to top right at each end while in the middle block the stripe runs from top left to bottom right.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

I have used 2.1/2″ strips of brown batik for the border.  You will need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the square chevrons quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Square chevrons basic quilt

Square chevrons basic quilt

Just for clarity, I’m putting in an image of the quilt with plain fabrics rather than the batiks that I have used.  I think that the designs show up better with plain colours.

Here’s the video:

Horses in Woodgate Valley

Horses in Woodgate Valley

Because I’m a diabetic I try to walk every day.  Yesterday I went on one of my favourite walks to Woodgate Valley.  It’s within walking distance of my home but feels as though it could be out in the country.  As well as plenty of woodland, you walk through a couple of fields of horses to reach the cafe.

There were still plenty of ripe blackberries in the hedges which was an added bonus.  One of the sections of woodland is called Bromwich Woods – and Bromwich was my maiden name.