Star and Squares Quilt – Free Pattern

Star and squares quilt

Star and squares quilt

The Star and Squares quilt is just as the name describes.  I’ve formed a large star in the middle with a pattern of squares in the corners.  These are shaded so that they form a blue diamond around the star.  I have used nine 15″ finished size blocks and the quilt measures 49″ square.  The quilt required 1 yard each of blue and green with 1.1/4 yards of white fabric.

As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.  I should add that for the green I have used a green metallic fabric that I think is really pretty.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the star and squares quilt

8.3/8″ squares:  ten blue, ten green

3.7/8″ squares:  ten blue, ten green

3.1/2″ squares:  sixteen green, sixteen blue, forty eight white

For the binding you will need to cut five 2.1/2″ white strips across the width of fabric.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use both the 8.3/8″ and the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a blue and a green square with right sides together and mark a line along one diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are either 3.1/2″ square or 7.7/8″ square.

Central block

Central block

Make the first block

Use four of the large half square triangles to create the central block.  I have used the simplest method of creating a diamond in a square block.  Place them in two pairs with the blue triangles in the middle.

Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  The block now measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make just one.

Second block

Second block

Make the second block

For the second block I have used the same four large half square triangles but arranged them differently.  This time the blue triangles form larger blue triangles pointing towards the middle while the green triangles also form larger green triangles, also pointing towards the middle.  As before, sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  This block also measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Corner block layout

Corner block layout

Make the squares block

For the corner blocks I have used a simple design of alternating squares, but I have shaded them so that the block is shaded blue in one half and shaded green in the other half.  The diagonal itself uses blue/green half square triangles.

The block consists of five rows of five squares.  I would recommend placing the half square triangles along the diagonal first and then adding blue and white to one side of the diagonal with green and white on the other side of the diagonal.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

At this stage the block measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the star and squares quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  For row one place a squares block at each end with the blue section nearest the middle and the green section forming the top corners of the quilt.  In the middle place one of the second blocks, laying it so that the blue triangles are vertical and the green triangles are horizontal.

Row two

Row two

In row two you need the diamond in a square block in the middle with a triangles block at each end.  Lay these so that the blue triangles are horizontal and the green triangles are vertical.

Row three

Row three

Row three is similar to row one, but the corner blocks are placed slightly differently.  The green triangles still form the quilt corners and the blue triangles still point towards the middle, but the diagonals move inwards now to complete the overall diamond in the background of the star – that was my intention anyway!

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

White quilt border

White quilt border

Add the quilt border

Use 2.1/2″ strips of white fabric for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the star and squares quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/F68OKWVAJnI

Shugborough Hall

Shugborough Hall

When travelling north on the motorway I have often seen signs for Shugborough Hall.  Last time I went to Fabric Freedom I made a detour so that I could visit it.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.

This week has been busy even by my standards.  I have been making a very large quilt for my appearance on the Sewing Quarter this morning.  It’s a gorgeous quilt, but it certainly took some time.  Then Fabric Freedom asked me to make some sample quilts for them, so I have been very busy.  After my two craft stalls this weekend I think I will need a day of quiet reading to recover!

Railfence Star Quilt Pattern

Railfence star quilt

Railfence star quilt

I have designed my railfence star quilt pattern with two colourways for the railfences and a few stars to give it some pop.  It is a very simple pattern to make, but very striking.  The quilt measures 56″ square, using 1.1/4 yards of yellow, 1/2 yard of white, 1 yard of one of the blues, 1/2 yard of another blue and 1/4 yard of everything else – that’s four purples and two more blue fabrics.

The fabrics are chosen to run from dark to light in blue and again in purple.  I have used sixty four blocks, all 6″ square finished size.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the railfence star quilt

Five 1.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric in four purples and four blues

Ten 1.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric in yellow and in white

2.1/2″ squares:  six yellow twenty four blue

2.7/8″ squares:  twelve yellow, twelve blue

For the borders you will need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips of yellow and six 2.1/2″ strips of blue across the width of fabric.

Make panels in blue and in purple

Make panels in blue and in purple

Make the railfence quilt blocks

Sew the 1.1/2″ strips of four blues with yellow and white along the length to make one panel.  Repeat with the four purples, yellow and white.  Place the strips so that they run from dark to light.  This makes a 6.1/2″ panel in each range of colours.  You need to make five of each panel.

Cut these panels at 6.1/2″ intervals to make 6.1/2″ squares.  You need to make twenty nine of these in blue and twenty nine in purple.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the star blocks

For the stars I have used the third lightest blue, but you could use any blue that you prefer.

Use the 2.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a blue and a yellow square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.

These are now 2.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the blue and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.  You need twenty four of these.

Star quilt block layout

Star quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.  Place a 2.1/2″ yellow square in the middle with a blue square in each corner.  Add half square triangles in the remaining spaces.  Check the photo to see which way to place the traingles.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Each star block measures 6.1/2″ square and you need to make six of them.

Rows 1-3

Rows 1-3

Assemble the railfence star quilt

Sew the blocks together in eight rows of eight blocks.  In row one place a star at each end.  Between them lay a purple block across, purple block down, blue block down, two purple blocks across and one purple block down.

For row two you need two blue blocks across, one purple down, two blues across, one blue down, one purple down and one blue across.  In row three place a purple down, blue down, two purples across, one purple down, one blue down and two purples across.

Rows 4-6

Rows 4-6

For row four you will need a purple down, two blues across, two stars, two blues across and one blue down.

In row five place two purples across, one purple down, one blue down, two purples across, one purple down and one blue down.

For row six place a blue across, blue down, purple down, two blues across, one blue down, one purple down and one blue across.

Rows 7-8

Rows 7-8

Make row seven witha purple across, blue down, two purples across, one purple down, one blue down and two purples across.

Finally for row eight place a star at each end.  Between them add two blues across, one blue down, one purple down, two blues across.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add two borders

Add two borders

Add the railfence star quilt borders

In border one I have used 2.1/2″ strips of yellow fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

For the second border I have used the second lightest blue fabric in 2.1/2″ strips.  You’ll need two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 56.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the railfence star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/GKdO5X03ecg

Ben Venom's quilts

Ben Venom’s quilts

Last time I wrote I was off to a craft fair the next day.  As a totally unexpected treat there was a quilt exhibition upstairs in the MAC building.  It featured Ben Venom’s quilts in an exhibition called All This Mayhem.  Ben is a renowned San Francisco artist.

I am delighted to see that this exhibition will be at the Festival of Quilts next month.  Well worth seeing if you are there.

All this mayhem

All this mayhem

Birmingham is known as the home of Heavy Metal music and Ben’s quilts are heavy metal music meets quilting.  Absolutely delightful.  He had used a sort of crazy quilting/applique technique and the detail was amazing.

Rose of Sharon Quilt – Free Pattern

Rose of Sharon quilt

Rose of Sharon quilt

The Rose of Sharon quilt block comes in many different forms.  Needless to say, I have chosen to design an easy version!  Within this quilt I’ve used applique as well as piecing.  Coincidentally it now looks to be a Christmas design, but that wasn’t my intention when I began to make it.  It seems that the original reference to the rose of Sharon comes from the Bible:

I am the rose of Sharon, and the lily of the valleys. As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters.
The Song of Solomon 2

Apparently the rose is now thought to be a variety of tulip that still grows in the plains of Sharon – the word rose was used when the Bible was translated into English.

The quilt measures 40″ square, using nine 12″ square finished size blocks.  I have used 3/4 yard each of white, red and green, with 1/2 yard of yellow.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the rose of Sharon quilt

12.1/2″ square:  one white

For the applique cut one 4″ strip of red and one 2.1/2″ green strip – both strips approximately 6″ long

6.7/8″ squares:  eight red, eight green

4.1/2″ squares:  twelve white, four red

4.7/8″ squares:  four each in red and white, four each in green and white

2.1/2″ squares:  four yellow, four white

4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  four white

Applique templates (if you wish to use mine) can be downloaded here.

For the border you will need to cut four 2.1/2″ yellow strips across the width of fabric.

Drawing the applique shapes

Drawing the applique shapes

Make the rose of Sharon quilt block

Use the 12.1/2″ white square as the background for this block.  Add a fusible interfacing (I used Mistyfuse) to the red and green strips for the applique.  You can either download the templates here or you may prefer to draw your own.  Basically for the large flower I drew round a wine glass and then added petals.  For the small flowers I did the same but used a liqueur glass.  My biggest problem was finding the right size – the large flower is roughly 3.1/2″ across and the small flower is roughly 2″ across.

Draw the shapes on to your fabric and cut out.

Partial placement

Partial placement

Place the template shapes on the white square.  In the photo you can see the large flower in the middle with pairs of stems leading off, each with a small flower at the end.  At this stage I was just checking the placements so that I could decide what size to make the leaves.

Rose of Sharon quilt block

Rose of Sharon quilt block

Then I cut the leaves and placed one between each pair of stems.  Broadly, each leaf points towards one corner.  The ends of the leaves and of the stems are tucked under the edges of the flowers.  When you’re happy with the placement, press the shapes to stick them to the background square.  It’s probably easiest to sew the shapes in place now.  I used a small zigzag stitch around all the edges.  This block measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make only one.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle block

Use the 6.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Lay a red and a green square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 6.1/2″ square.

Alternate blocks

Alternate block

Sew these together in fours, making sure that the green triangles are side by side forming larger triangles opposite each other.  Likewise for the red triangles.  At this stage the block measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Pieced rose quilt block

Pieced rose quilt block

Make the rose corner blocks

For this block I have pieced roses, one pointing to each corner.  Make red/white and green/white half square triangles with the 4.7/8″ squares.

Place a white 4.1/2″ square in three corners with a red square in the middle.  Add two green/white half square triangles either side of the bottom right white square.  These are the leaves of the rose.  Place two red/white half square triangles to form a butterfly shape across the top left corner.  In the top left corner place the 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ white strip with 2.1/2″ white and yellow squares beneath it.

Sew the three pieces of the top left corner together first to make one square.  Then sew the squares together across each row and sew the rows to each other.  At this stage the rose block measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Rose one and two

Rows one and two

Assemble the rose of Sharon quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  In row one place a pieced rose block at each end with a half square triangle block in the middle.  Make sure that the roses point towards the corners and the green is vertical in the half square triangle block.

In row two place the rose of Sharon block in the middle with a half square triangle on either side of it.  This time make sure that the green is horizontal in the half square triangle blocks.

Row three

Row three

For row three you will need a half square triangle block (green vertical) in the middle, with a pieced rose block on either side.  The roses point downwards towards the corners.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Yellow quilt border

Yellow quilt border

Add the quilt border

Use 2.1/2″ strips of yellow fabric for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the rose of Sharon quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/P5QN8MWuba0

It’s been a manic week as I’m back on Sewing Quarter’s TV channel on Sunday.  I’m demonstrating one of my own quilts (quite ordinary) and a quilt pattern by Lynne Edwards which I think is absolutely stunning.  I think that my sessions are at 9 and 11 o’clock.  The Sewing Quarter is available on Sky 687, Freeview 73, youtube or online.  I’m also demonstrating again on Tuesday 18th June.

Wrought iron work

Wrought iron work

But although I haven’t had the chance to do any travelling this week I didn’t want to leave you without any photos so here are two that I took a few weeks ago when I visited the lovely V&A  Museum in London.

This one was an exhibition of wrought iron work and there were some lovely examples there that I could just see in a Through the Gate quilt.

What a dress!

What a dress!

This one came from the fashion exhibition.  Imagine trying to walk around in a dress this size!

Irish Chain Star Quilt Pattern

Irish chain star quilt

Irish chain star quilt

My Irish chain star quilt was intended to be more of an Irish chain but I kept adding extra elements so I’m not sure if it still qualifies as an Irish chain quilt.  All three blocks are very simple to make.  I’ve used two batik fabrics and I’m really pleased with how the quilt looks now.  There are twenty five 9″ blocks finished size in the design.  The quilt measures 53″ square and I have used 1.3/4 yards of blue batik, 1 yard of cream, 3/4 yard of white and 1/2 yard of green batik.

As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.  As it’s my 65th birthday on Sunday I am also offering an additional 20% off all purchases over £6.  Details at the bottom of the page.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the Irish star quilt

3,1/2″ squares:  sixty five blue, sixty eight white, four cream  – but check the pattern before you cut these as they can be pieced using strip piecing

3.7/8″ squares:  eight cream, eight white

9.7/8″ squares:  four green, four blue

For the borders you will need five 2.1/2″ cream strips and five 2.1/2″ blue strips cut across the width of fabric.

Strip piecing

Strip piecing

Make the nine patch units

Sew together 3.1/2″ strips of blue, white, blue and of white, blue, white.  Cut these panels at 3.1/2″ intervals.  This gives you rectangles 9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ which can be used to form the nine patch units.

Nine patch unit

Nine patch unit

Lay down a blue-white-blue strip at the top and bottom with a white-blue-white strip between them.  Sew the three strips to each other.  This forms the nine patch unit.  At this stage it measures 9.1/2″ square and you need to make thirteen of these.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the alternate block

Use the 9.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Lay a blue and a green square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Cut along the marked line to produce two half square triangle units.  Trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.  This unit measures 9.1/2″ square now and you need to make eight of them.

Star block layout

Star block layout

Make the star blocks

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the same way as above.  Place a 3.1/2″ cream square in the middle with white squares in each corner.  Add four half square triangle units in the remaining spaces.  Check the photo to see that you place the triangles correctly.  You need to have a cream edge lying against the central square.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  This block measures 9.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make four of them.

Rows one and two

Rows one and two

Assemble the Irish chain star quilt

Sew the blocks together in five rows of five.

In row one place a nine patch unit in positions one, three and five with a blue/green half square triangle in positions two and four.  Place the half square triangles so that the green is on the outside.  The seam line begins to form a line going from the top middle of the quilt to the middle of the sides.

For row two lay a half square triangle at each end with a nine patch, star, nine patch between them.  Again place the half square triangles so that the green is on the outside.

Rows three and four

Rows three and four

In row three, the central row, place nine patch units in positions one, three and five.  Lay two star blocks in positions two and four.

Row four is similar to row two – a half square triangle at each end with a nine patch, star and nine patch between them.  Note that the half square triangles are angled differently now, so that the seams now begin to form lines running from the sides to the middle of the bottom edge.

Row five

Row five

Row five is similar to row one – nine patch units in positions one, three and five with half square triangles in positions two and four.  Again the half square triangles are placed so that the green is on the outside.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the borders

Add the borders

Add the quilt borders

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of cream fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

Make the second border with 2.1/2″ strips of blue fabric – two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 53.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Irish chain quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/ffqrXk512Mg

Prague patchwork 2019

Prague patchwork 2019

A few weeks ago I fulfilled one of my ambitions and went to Prague Patchwork 2019.  I first heard about it years ago and have always wanted to visit it.  It was a magnificent exhibition and you can see my photos by clicking here or click on the photo.

Now at the top of the page I mentioned that on Sunday I will reach the ripe old age of 65.  In order to celebrate this I am offering a 20% discount across the shop on all purchases over £6.  There is no code required – the discount will be applied automatically at checkout.  You can visit the shop here.

20% off all purchases over £6

Rolling Star Quilt Pattern -My Variation

Rolling star quilt

Rolling star quilt

I had the Rolling Star quilt block in mind when I began this quilt design, but then I changed it so much that it’s probably no longer correct to call it a rolling star.  Do tell me if you can think of a better name!  I’m really pleased with the design – lots of secondary patterns to grab your attention when you look at it.  The quilt measures 48″ square and I have used four 20″ finished size blocks.

For the quilt I used 1/2 yard each of gold and white, 3/4 yard of brown, 1 yard of blue and 1.1/4 yards of red fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the rolling star quilt

4.1/2″ squares:  four red

4.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in blue and red, six each in red and gold, two each in red and white

2.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty two brown

2.1/2″ squares:  sixteen white, sixteen gold

2.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each brown and white, sixteen each in brown and gold, sixteen each in red and white

For the borders you will need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric in both blue and red.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use both the 2.7/8″ and the 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangles which are now either 2.1/2″ or 4.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners on each square where the fabric sticks out.  Sorry – there are quite a lot of half square triangles in this pattern!

Central star

Central star

Make the red star

The star in the middle of each block is a simple eight pointed star.  First place a 4.1/2″ red square in the middle. Then place a pair of red/white half square triangles on each edge of the red square.  Lay these so that the two white triangles are side by side and together they form a larger white triangle pointing towards the middle.  Now add a 2.1/2″ white square in each corner.

For this block I think that it’s more simple to sew sections together as you go rather than laying out the entire block and then sewing the pieces together.  So begin by sewing the pairs of half squares triangles together.  Sew one pair to the top of the red square and another to the bottom of the square.  Now sew the white squares to the other two pairs of half square triangles to make two columns.  Sew one to each side of the block.  This section now measures 8.1/2″ square.

First frame

First frame

Add the first frame

The next frame is mostly brown and gold.  Place a pair of brown/white half square triangles in the middle of each edge.  Lay them so that the two white triangles form a larger white triangle pointing away from the middle.  You’ll see that they now form white diamonds with the larger white triangles in the red star block.

Add a brown/gold half square triangle on each side of the brown/white ones – that’s two on each edge.  Make sure that the brown triangles are together so that they form a short stripe around the white large triangles.  Add a gold 2.1/2″ square in each corner.  Note that the corners are now large gold triangles – that’s another way to check that you have all the triangles correctly placed.

Sew together the four half square triangles at the top and sew them to the central section.  Repeat with the bottom four half square triangles.  Sew the patchwork pieces down the sides into two columns and sew one to each side of the block.  At this stage the block measures 12.1/2″ square.

Final frame

Final frame

The final frame

For this final frame I have increased the size of the squares to give 4″ finished size patches.  Place a pair of blue/red half square triangles in the middle of each edge.  Lay them so that the blue triangles lie together, forming a larger blue triangle pointing away from the middle.  Place a 2.1/2″ brown rectangle on either side of the half square triangles.

In three corners add a red/gold half square triangle with the gold on the outside, forming the corner of the block.  For the fourth corner use a red/white half square triangle.  As before, sew together the two half square triangles and the rectangles at the top and bottom and sew them to the central block.  Sew the squares on the sides together to form two columns and sew one column to each side of the block.

That completes the rolling star quilt block.  It measures 20.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make four of them.

Keep the white triangles in the middle

Keep the white triangles in the middle

Assemble the rolling star quilt

Sew the blocks together in two pairs and sew the pairs to each other.  Rotate the blocks so that the white triangle is always in the middle.  These together form the white diamond in the middle of the quilt.

I have added two borders, both made with 2.1/2″ strips of fabric.

Add the borders

Add the borders

For the first border use blue fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 44.1/2″ for the sides.  Make the second, red border with two lengths of 44.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the rolling star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/KIhNpvjkfzw

As a final thought I would love to hear your ideas for a better name for this quilt.  Let me know in the Comments section below.  There’s a pack of four fat quarters for the name that I like best from among your suggestions.

Fabric shop in Tenerife

Fabric shop in Tenerife

The weather seems to have turned very cold for those of us in the northern hemisphere so I am doubly glad that I spent nearly a week enjoying some winter sun in the Canary Islands.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.  As you can see, I managed to find a wonderful fabric shop which sold every type of fabric imaginable!

 

Candy Stripe Binding Courthouse Steps Quilt

Candy stripe binding

Candy stripe binding

In this quilt pattern I have used candy stripe binding to make a simple quilt into something that bit different.  I used seven fabrics within the quilt and then used all seven of them in the binding.  Each quilt block is  14″ square finished size.  The Courthouse Steps is a variation on the log cabin style of block and the alternate block was made with large half square triangle units.

The quilt measures 46″ square and I needed 1.1/4 yards of dark blue, 1 yard of light blue, 3/4 yard of red, 1/2 yard each of medium blue and brown, with 1/4 yard each of orange and natural.  As ever, you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

In order to show you the binding I had to finish the quilting so for once I can show you the quilting as well!




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the candy stripe binding quilt

2.1/2″ squares:  five red, ten natural

6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  ten light blue, ten orange

10.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  ten medium blue, ten brown

14.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  ten dark blue

15.1/4″ squares:  two dark blue, two light blue

For the border you will need to cut four 2.1/2″ red strips across the width of fabric

For the binding you will need an additional 2.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric of each of the seven fabrics.

Central area

Central area

Make the Courthouse Steps quilt block

Courthouse steps is a variation on log cabin blocks but you add opposite logs at the same time rather than working round the central square.  All the pieces are 2.1/2″ wide so that you can use jelly rolls if you wish.

So place a 2.1/2″ red square in the middle with a natural square on either side.  Sew these three pieces together in a row.  Add a 6.1/2″ light blue strip to the top and bottom.

Press the seam allowances away from the red square

Press the seam allowances away from the red square

You need to press the block at each stage and it is best to press all the seam allowances away from the red square.

I have shaded the colours away from the central square – light, medium and dark blue in one direction and natural, orange and brown in the other direction.

Second round

Second round

Make the second round with a 6.1/2″ orange strip on either side and a 10.1/2″ medium blue strip on top and bottom.

Full layout

Full layout

For the third and final round, you need to sew a 10.1/2″ brown strip to each side with a 14.1/2″ dark blue strip to the top and bottom.

At this stage the block measures 14.1/2″ square and you need to make five of these.

Cut along both diagonals

Cut along both diagonals

Make the alternate block

Cut the 15.1/4″ dark and light blue squares along both diagonals to create four triangles from each square.

Alternate block layout

Alternate block layout

Place two dark blue triangles with two light blue triangles to re form the square shape.  Make sure that the colours alternate.

Sew the triangles together in two pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  The block measures 14.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make four of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Row one contains an alternate block in the middle with a courthouse steps block on either side.  Place the alternate block so that the dark blue runs from top to bottom of the block.

Row two

Row two

In row two place a courthouse steps block in the middle with an alternate block on either side of it.  This time the dark blue in the alternate blocks should run from side to side.  Together the blocks form a shape almost like a sweetie or a Christmas cracker.

The third row is the same as the first row – an alternate block in the middle with a courthouse steps block on either side.  The dark blue in the alternate block runs from top to bottom.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Quilt border

Quilt border

Add the border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 42.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 46.1/2″ for the sides.

Embroidered quilting

Embroidered quilting

Quilting the quilt

As I wanted to show you the candy stripe binding I had to complete this quilt, so I chose a simple embroidery stitch for the quilting.  I used a contrasting thread (red) rather than a matching one and used the stemstitch option.  I quilted around the central area of each Courthouse Steps block, round the central blue diamond and round the edges of the light blue star shape.

Sew a strip of each fabric

Sew a strip of each fabric

Cut the candy stripe quilt binding strips

Sew together one 2.1/2″ strip of each fabric along the length.  This will give you a panel 14.1/2″ wide by about 42″ long.  Press all the seam allowances open.  Place your ruler so that the 45 degree line runs up one edge of the panel (where my fingers are in the photo).  Cut that bottom triangle off at somewhere round the 4 to 5″ mark.  This triangle can be discarded as it’s too small to be of any use.

Cut the first strip

Cut the first strip

Now move your ruler up so that the 2.1/2″ line runs along the edge that you just cut – where my thumb is in the photo.  Cut along the edge of the ruler.  This will give you a strip 2.1/2″ wide.

Continue cutting strips

Continue cutting strips

Continue moving your ruler up 2.1/2″ at a time, cutting more candy stripe binding strips.  These will get longer and then start getting shorter again as you reach the end of the panel.

Join the strips to make one long strip

Join the strips to make one long strip

Join the binding strips

When you place the binding strips side by side you’ll see that you have two 45 degree edges to join together.

Sew them at right angles to each other

Sew them at right angles to each other

In order to sew these together, you need to place one at right angles to the other.

To make sure that you end up with a straight line you need to offset the two strips against each other.

This happens if you don't offset the strips

This happens if you don’t offset the strips

In the photo above the blue sticks out above the red at the top and the red sticks out below the blue at the bottom.  If you don’t do this your line of binding will not be straight – as you can see in the photo on the side.  When you have joined all the strips together, fold and press the entire strip in half along the length.

It should now resemble an ordinary binding strip and you can sew it to the quilt in the normal way.  Full details of this step can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

My personal favourite

My personal favourite

Festival of Quilts

Last week I spent a wonderful day at the Festival of Quilts – much more easy for me to get to now that I live in Birmingham.  All the quilts were wonderful, as always, but there were two that really caught my eye.  This one was probably my overall favourite.

Beautiful design

Beautiful design

This one was very cleverly designed and really striking.

Neither of my choices matched with the overall Visitors’ Choice quilt.  After it was announced at the end of the show I looked in my photos and found that I hadn’t even taken a photo of that one to show you.

Best miniature quilt

Best miniature quilt

There was one more which was quite breathtaking – a miniature quilt by Philippa Naylor which was quite out of this world – compasses and prairie points in a quilt that probably only measured about 10″ square!  It well deserved to be winner of that category.

Bletchley Park

Bletchley Park

And finally.  I visited an extraordinary place recently – Bletchley Park, home of the codebreakers.  This was the home of all the people who worked on breaking codes during the war.  It’s a fascinating place and very visitor-friendly.  You can see more about my trip by clicking here or click on the photo.

Christmas Star Tree Quilt – Free Pattern

Christmas star quilt

Christmas star quilt

The Christmas star tree quilt pattern is my nod to Christmas in July – well I’ve only missed July by a few days.  The quilt measures 40″ square and I have used 1 yard of red fabric , 1.1/4 yards of gold and 1/4 yard each of green and brown.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.  Apart from the brown they are all metallic Christmas fabrics.

I have created a large star in the middle (24″ square) and surrounded it with Christmas tree blocks.  For the cornerstones I have used several layers of fabric on top of each other.  The tree blocks are not square, but they don’t need to be as they are on the edge of the quilt.




Cutting requirements for the Christmas star tree quilt

6.1/2″ squares: four red, four gold

6.7/8″ squares: four red,  four gold

3.7/8″ squares: sixteen green,  sixteen gold

3″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles: thirty two gold

1.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles: sixteen brown

For the cornerstones you will need four 5.1/2″ red squares and eight 5.1/2″ gold squares.

For the second border you will need to cut four 3.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Place a red and a gold 6.7/8″ square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal . Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the line and cut along the line . This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 6.1/2″ square.

Star layout

Star layout

Make the star section

Lay the patchwork pieces out in four rows of four.  Place the four 6.1/2″ gold squares in the middle with a red square in each corner.  Add two half square triangles on each edge of the central square.  Lay these so that the red triangles together form larger red triangles pointing towards the middle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The quilt measures 24.1/2″ square at this point.

Top half of the tree

Top half of the tree

Make the tree blocks

I have used a very simple block to make the trees for the first border.  Make half square triangle units with the 3.7/8″ green and gold squares.  Lay these in pairs so that the two green triangles together form a larger triangle pointing upwards.

Strip piece the tree trunk

Strip piece the tree trunk

For the trunk of the trees I have used strip piecing to save time.  Sew together two 3″ strips of gold with a 1.1/2″ brown strip between them.  Cut this panel at 2.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 6.1/2″ long by 2.1/2″ wide.

Tree block

Tree block

Place one trunk strip beneath each pair of half square triangle units.  Sew the two triangles together first and then sew the gold/brown/gold rectangle to the bottom.  These blocks now measure 6.1/2″ by 5.1/2″ and you need to make sixteen of them.

Four trees per strip

Four trees per strip

Make the first border

Sew the trees together in four rows of four blocks.  Sew one row to the top of the star and one to the bottom of the star.  Place the bottom row upside down so that the tree trunks are always nearest the star.

Make the cornerstones

For the cornerstones I have tried something a bit different to give the design a circular feel.

Make the cornerstones

Make the cornerstones

Lay a red 5.1/2″ square with right side up.  Take two 5.1/2″ gold squares and fold them in half along the diagonal.  Place one on the bottom left section of the red square with the fold of the gold triangle running along the diagonal of the red square.  Pin in place.  Repeat with the second folded triangle in the top right section of the red square.

Sew all round the square very close to the edge just to hold the layers together.

Roll the folds back

Roll the folds back

About half way along the diagonal, pin each fold back about 1/4″, exposing the red fabric underneath.

Roll back the fold all along its length.  It will roll back a small amount at each end and up to 1/4″ where you’ve pinned it in the middle.  Sew the fold down to hold it in place.  In the photo the folds are just pinned in the top square, then one side is sewn in the second square and both edges are sewn in the third square.

Sew the fold down

Sew the fold down

I know that some quilters machine sew this stage but I always feel that I get a neater finish when I hand sew.

I feel that this red diagonal gives a lot to the Christmas star tree quilt design – well worth using.

Complete the side borders

Sew the cornerstones to the trees

Sew the cornerstones to the trees

Sew one cornerstone to each end of the two remaining tree strips.  Take care that the red diagonals are placed correctly as shown in the photo.

The strip on the left will go down the left of the quilt while the other one is sewn to the right of the quilt.

There are actually four trees in those strips but I had to fold the strips up in order to fit it all into the photo.

Second border

Second border

Add the second border

For the second and final border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 34.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Christmas star tree quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Coffin Works Birmingham

Coffin Works Birmingham

I went to a fascinating museum recently.  It’s called the Coffin Works and you can see my photos by clicking here or on the photo.

I’ve signed up for a stall at a craft fair at the Gunmaker’s Arms in Birmingham on Sunday August 12th.  It’s part of a much bigger festival for the area:  if you’re in the area do call in and say hello.

 

Piano Keys Star Quilt Free Pattern

Piano Keys Star quilt

Piano Keys Star quilt

When I designed the Piano Keys Star quilt my original intention was to place a piano keys border around each block.  However as I went along I decided to use the piano keys sections as sashing rather than complete borders around each block.

I had hoped to create a look where the light blue background to the star blocks blended with the light blue piano keys, while the dark blue plain blocks blended with the dark blue piano keys.  I think that I have achieved this.

I’ve used ten simple star blocks with ten plain squares, all 9″ square finished size.  The piano keys sections are 3″ by 9″ finished size and I made thirty of them.

The quilt measures 49″ by 61″, another rectangular quilt.  I have used 1 yard of red, 1.1/2 yards of light blue and 1.3/4 yards of dark blue fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Quilt components

Quilt components

Cutting requirements for the piano keys star quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  ten dark blue, forty light blue, twelve red

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty dark blue, twenty light blue

9.1/2″ squares:  ten dark blue

1.1/2″ strips:  fifteen light blue, twelve dark blue – all cut across the width of fabric

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ of red across the width of fabric.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a light blue and a dark blue square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the dark blue and clip the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Star quilt block layout

Star quilt block layout

Make the star quilt blocks

I’ve used a very simple nine patch star quilt block pattern.  Place a dark blue square in the middle and a light blue square in each corner.  Place a half square triangle unit in each of the remaining spaces.  Check the photo to be sure that you have them placed correctly.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block measures 9.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make ten of them.

Make three panels

Make three panels

Make the piano keys sections

Sew together five light blue and four dark blue 1.1/2″ strips.  This will give you a panel 9.1/2″ wide and around 42″ long.  Make three of these panels.  Cut the panels at 3.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″.  You will need thirty of these.

Basic rows of the quilt

Basic rows of the quilt

Assemble the piano keys star quilt

Each row of the quilt contains two star blocks, two dark blue plain squares and three piano keys sections.  Each sashing row contains four sashing strips and three red cornerstone squares.

Make three rows as the top row shown, with star, plain, star, plain blocks.  Make four of the sashing rows shown in the middle of the photo.  You need to make just two of the final row shown with plain, star, plain, star blocks.

Sew the blocks together across each row.  Sew the rows together alternating the star rows with the plain block rows and placing a sashing row after every row.

Use red for the border

Use red for the border

Add the piano keys star quilt border

I have used simple 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric to tie in with the red cornerstones.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt with two lengths of 61.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the piano keys star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Washington DC

Washington DC

I have finally written up the Washington part of my American trip.  To see the photos you can click here or click on the photo.

Hawaiian quilt

Hawaiian quilt

I have also been busy finishing quilts and I have found it really satisfying.  I began with a couple of wall hangings that have been waiting in the UFO pile for quite a while.  For this Hawaiian quilt I used a blanket stitch machine embroidery to edge the palm trees.

Sunflower wall hanging

Sunflower wall hanging

I am really pleased with the Sunflower wall hanging.  I drew three petals in each triangle and then sewed each petal shape with a second petal echo quilted just inside the first one.  It’s a very simple design but looks great, I think.

Before the next quilt pattern in two weeks’ time I will write a full article showing you how I have finished various projects.  I’m not suggesting that my quilting is the right way, but I hope that it will give you ideas for your own quilting.

Columbian Star Quilt Pattern

Columbian star quilt

Columbian star quilt

The Columbian Star quilt block is the centrepiece of this quilt pattern.  I have tried to use elements from this block in the surrounding blocks.  The nine blocks are all huge – 30″ square finished size – giving an enormous 94″ square quilt.  This should cover any size of bed comfortably.

I needed 4.3/4 yards of white fabric, 4 yards of purple and 3/4 yard of the floral border fabric.

Completed Columbian star quilt block

Completed Columbian star quilt block

Cutting requirements for the Columbian star quilt

6.1/2″ squares:  four white

12.1/2″ squares:  one purple

3.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles:  four white

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty white, twenty purple

3.1/2″ squares:  four purple, eight white

15.7/8″ squares:  four purple, four white

15.1/2″ squares:  four purple

8″ squares:  sixteen white

8.3/8″ squares:  sixteen purple, sixteen white

For the border you will need to cut nine 2.1/2″ strips across the width of a contrasting fabric.




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a purple and a white square right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the purple and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

You will also need to make half square triangle units from the 15.7/8″ and 8.3/8″ squares, but for these I have simply cut the squares along one diagonal and then sewn one white and one white purple triangle together along the diagonals.

Top section

Top section

Make the Columbian star quilt block top

I am showing you this layout in three sections for clarity.  Place a 6.1/2″ white square at each end with two half square triangles on two edges of each square.  Lay a 3.1/2″ purple square diagonally in from the corner of each white square.  Between these corner sections place a 12.1/2″ white rectangle at the top with a row of four half square triangles beneath it.  Underneath these place two 3.1/2″ white squares with a pair of half square triangles betwen them.  Check the photo carefully to be sure which way to place all the half square triangles.  In the middle they need to form a V shape pointing downwards.

Partially sewn section

Partially sewn section

Sew the squares together across the two rows between the white squares.  Then sew the two rows to each other.  Now add the large white square on each end.  Sew all the squares together across the third row and add this to the bottom of the section.

Central section

Central section

Middle section of block

Begin this section with the 12.1/2″ purple square.  For the column on either side of the square place four half square triangles.  Lay them so that the purple triangles start to form a V shape pointing towards the central square.  For the next column out you need two white squares with a half square triangle at each end of the column.  For the third column out place one 12.1/2″ white rectangle.  Sew the patchwork pieces together down each column, sew the columns to each other and then sew these sections to the central square.

Bottom third of the block

Bottom third of the block

Lower third of the block

The bottom section of the block is more or less the same as the top section, just the other way up.  The first row of this section contains four half square triangles in the middle with a purple square outside of these and then two more half square triangle units.

Make the second row with two white squares in the middle and a pair of half square triangles on either side of the squares.  Use the final 12.1/2″ white rectangle with a half square triangle at each end for the third row.  Add a 6.1/2″ white square at each end of these last two rows.  Once again sew the small squares together across each row, sew the bottom two rows to each other and then sew them to the white squares at the ends.  Sew this section to the first row.

Finally sew all three sections together to complete the Columbian star quilt block.  This measures 30.1/2″ square at this stage and you just need to make one.

Corner block layout

Corner block layout

Make the corner blocks

For the corner blocks I have used the rosebud shape that appears in the Columbian star quilt block – but made it a lot bigger.  Make half square triangles using the 15.7/8″ squares.  Cut the squares in half along one diagonal and then sew a purple triangle to a white triangle.

Place a white and a purple 15.1/2″ square diagonally opposite each other.  Lay two half square triangles diagonally opposite each other so that the purple triangles form a butterfly shape.

Sew the pieces together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  This block now measures 30.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Third block layout

Third block layout

Make the third block

In the third block I have taken the V shapes in the Columbian star quilt block and again supersized them.  Make half square triangles using the 8.3/8″ squares.  In the first row use four half square triangles placed so that the white triangles form a larger triangle pointing downwards and the purple triangles begin to form the stripes of the V shape.  In the second row place two half square triangles in the middle with an 8″ white square at each end.  Repeat these two rows to form the third and fourth rows.

Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  This block now measures 30.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  In row one place a rosebud block at each end with a V block in the middle.  Place the rosebuds so that they point towards the corner, with the white square forming the corner of the quilt.

Row two

Row two

For the second row place the Columbian star quilt block in the middle with a V block at each end.  Place these so that the V shapes are horizontal, pointing towards the middle.

Row three

Row three

In row three place a rosebud block at each end with a V block in the middle.  The V shapes point upwards towards the middle while the rosebuds point towards the corners.

Add the top border

Add the top border

Finishing the quilt

Normally now I would add the border, sew the blocks to each other and then sew the three rows to each other.  However this quilt is so large that I am going to sew it together using quilt as you go in rows.  I have added the border strip of a contrasting fabric to the top of the first row and the bottom of the third row.  Then I added wadding and backing fabric to each row, making sure that I left a good 3″ of these at either side.  Now I am going to quilt each row separately, sew the rows to each other using qayg and then add the side borders as a final step.  I haven’t had time to do these steps yet, but I will show you the photos when I have completed the quilt.

Here’s the video:

 

Swallow Falls

Swallow Falls

Last week I spent a few days in North Wales.  On the way back I stopped to see the Swallow Falls which I have always intended to visit.  The falls are just outside a small town called Betws-y-Coed.  They were absolutely stunning, but it was almost impossible to take a photo that did them justice.  They weren’t very wide but seemed to go on in stages for a great distance.  My photos looked terribly flat and didn’t show the force of the falls so I put together a short video which gives more of a feeling of the water thundering down.

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Butterfly Star Quilt – Free Pattern

Butterfly star quilt

Butterfly star quilt

For the Butterfly Star quilt my aim was to find a design where the butterflies and stars appeared to be floating randomly within the quilt.  In order to achieve this I made the butterflies and stars off centre so that when I rotated the blocks they would look like random placements rather than straight lines.  Both of the blocks are very easy to make so this quilt goes together really quickly.  I have used sixteen blocks which are all 12″ square finished size.  The quilt measures 52″ square, using 2 yards of the blue sky background fabric, 3/4 yard of green star and 1/2 yard of lilac floral fabric.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the butterfly star quilt

4.1/2″ squares:  sixteen blue

4.7/8″ squares:  eight blue, eight lilac

8.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangles:  eight blue

12.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangles:  eight blue

3.1/2″ squares:  eight green, thirty two blue

3.7/8″ squares:  sixteen green, sixteen blue

9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  eight blue

12.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  eight blue

For the border you will need to cut five 2.1/2″ lengths of green star fabric across the width of fabric.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units.

Use both the 3.7/8″ and 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place either a lilac or a green square right sides together with a blue square and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This will produce two half square triangle units which are either 3.1/2″ or 4.1/2″ square.   Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Butterfly block layout

Butterfly block layout

Make the butterfly quilt block

Lay two lilac/blue half square triangles and two 4.1/2″ blue squares diagonally opposite each other.

Lay an 8.1/2″ blue rectangle down the right hand side of the four patch unit, with a 12.1/2″ blue rectangle across the bottom.  Sew the squares and half square triangles together in pairs and then sew the pairs together.  Add the rectangle to the right and then sew the 12.1/2″ rectangle across the bottom.

The block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make eight of them.

Star block layout

Star block layout

Make the star quilt block

Lay the nine pieces of the star in three rows of three.  Place a green star square in the middle with a green/blue half square triangle on each edge of the central square.  Lay these so that the triangles form the points of the star.  Place a 3.1/2″ blue square in each corner of this nine patch section.

Sew the three squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  Now add a 3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ blue rectangle on the right hand side and then a 3.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ blue rectangle across the bottom of the block.

At this stage the block also measures 12.1/2″ square and you also need to make eight of them.

Rows one and two

Rows one and two

Assemble the butterfly star quilt

There are many different ways of arranging these blocks.  I have chosen to alternate the butterflies and stars across the rows and down the columns, rotating them to give the random placement effect.

In row one begin with a butterfly placed top right of the block.  Follow this with a star placed bottom right, a butterfly placed top left and a star also placed top left.

For row two you need to place a star top left, a butterfly placed top right, a star placed bottom right and a butterfly placed top right.

Rows three and four

Rows three and four

In row three I have begun with a butterfly placed top right, a star placed top right, followed by a butterfly placed bottom right and a star placed placed top left.

For row four begin with a star placed top left followed by a butterfly placed bottom left, a star placed top left and a butterfly placed top right.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Green stars for the border

Green stars for the border

Add the quilt border

I have used 2.1/2″ strips of the green star fabric for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom with a 52.1/2″ length for each side.

That completes the butterfly star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginning quilter section.

Here’s the video:

 

 

Himley Hall

Himley Hall

And I have also been exploring this week.  I visited (accidentally) Himley Hall and spent a wonderful morning touring the exhibitions and the parkland.  You can read about it here or just click on the photo.