St Tiggywinkles Hospital – Photos

St Tiggywinkles Hospital

St Tiggywinkles Hospital

When I visited St Tiggywinkles Hospital I was utterly enchanted – even if I didn’t see a single live hedgehog!  The sweeties in the photo are actually stuffed toys for sale in their shop.

St Tiggywinkles was opened by Sue and Les Stocker with their son in 1978 when they began treating wild animals on a voluntary basis.  It was the first wildlife treatment centre and soon became (and has remained) world renowned for the work it does.




St Tiggywinkle hospital building

St Tiggywinkle hospital building

History

The hospital is named after Mrs Tiggywinkle in the Beatrix Potter books which were a great favourite with my children.  The hospital had become a registered charity in 1983 – and became swamped with hedgehog casualties in 1984 during a drought.

Tortoise patients

Tortoise patients

The blackboard at the entrance to the visitor centre lists the casualties that they are treating and I was amazed both at the number of different species and the total numbers of animals and birds that they are treating on a regular basis.

The tortoise area had a wide variety of tortoises – I hadn’t realised quite how different they are in shape, size, colour and the patterns on their shells.  I was also amazed at the speed with which they could move when following the young lady who brought their food to them!

Recycled bottle tops

Recycled bottle tops

There is a deer paddock for the recovering deer, but this fellow is a timely reminder of how much recycling we need to do.  He is made entirely from used bottle tops.

The visitor centre boasts a children’s playground, quiet area and a lovely area of pens where you can stroll around seeing the enormous variety of wild life that needs help.

Red kite

Red kite

The red kite is a bird of prey, a protected species which was once near to extinction in Britain.  They are being successfully re introduced to the countryside and any casualties are well looked after at St Tiggywinkles.  We saw this red kite on top of the enclosure but we were assured that he was a former patient rather than an escapee.

I was determined to visit this place based purely on its delightful name, but I am so pleased that I went there.  A very worthwhile charity doing wonderful work and they are very welcoming to the general public.