Pieced Sashing Star Quilt Pattern

Pieced sashing star quilt

Pieced sashing star quilt

For my pieced sashing star quilt pattern I have used a very simple star block and pieced the sashing instead of using just one fabric in strips.  I think that it has added quite a lot to the design and I’m really pleased with the extra shapes that show up within the quilt.  It makes the quilt pattern look quite complicated when in fact it’s very easy to make.

The quilt is rectangular, measuring 48″ by 62″.  I have used twelve 12″ finished size blocks and I needed 1 yard each of the green and lilac together with 1.1/2 yards of dark blue. They are all batik fabrics.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the pieced sashing star quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  forty eight dark blue, twenty lilac

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  twenty four green

3.7/8″ squares:   forty eight green, forty eight dark blue

For the sashing you will need four 3.1/2″ lilac strips cut across the width of fabric, two 6.1/2″ dark blue strips cut across the width of fabric, and twenty 2.1/2″ lilac squares.

To make the border you will need six 2.1/2″ lilac strips cut across the width of fabric.

Making half square triangles

Making half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use all the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a green and a dark blue square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the dark blue and trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Star quilt block layout

Star quilt block layout

Make the star blocks

Lay the patchwork pieces out in four rows.

Begin with two green rectangles in the middle.  Together these form a 6″ square finished size.  You could also use one 6.1/2″ square or four 3.1/2″ squares for this part.  On each edge of this central area place two half square triangle units.  Lay these so that the two dark blue triangles together form a larger triangle pointing towards the middle.  Add a dark blue square in each corner.

Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the star block.  This measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make twelve of them.

Cut the sashing strips

Cut the sashing strips

Make the sashing strips

For the sashing I have made 2.1/2″ pieced strips.  Use strip piecing for the most simple way to make these sections.  Sew together a 3.1/2″ lilac strip on either side of a 6.1/2″ dark blue strip.  Cut this panel at 2.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 2.1/2″ wide by 12.1/2″ long.

You need to make two of these panels so that you can cut thirty one sashing strips.

Sew the rows together

Sew the rows together

Assemble the pieced sashing star quilt

Lay the blocks in four rows of three blocks each.  Add sashing strips at the beginning and end of each row as well as between the blocks.  That means that you need three blocks and four sashing strips for each row.  Sew the sections together across each row.

Add sashing strips between the rows

Add sashing strips between the rows

You need a row of sashing strips between each row of quilt blocks.  Make these strips using three sashing strips and four cornerstones (2.1/2″ lilac squares), so that you have a lilac square at each end as well as one between each pair of strips.

Make five of these sashing strips.  Sew one between each row of star quilt blocks as well as one at the top and the bottom of the quilt.

Lilac quilt border

Lilac quilt border

Add the quilt border

I’ve added a simple border using 2.1/2″ lilac strips.  You need two lengths of 44.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt with two lengths of 62.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the pieced sashing star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

 

Alcester high street

Alcester high street

Last week I mentioned that I was visiting Alcester, a small town not far from here.  The town has a really pretty high street and I loved the church.

Inside Alcester church

Inside Alcester church

The inside of the church was beautiful.  Imagine having to paint between those beams in the ceiling!

Wonky Log Cabin Quilt Pattern

Wonky log cabin quilt

Wonky log cabin quilt

I have made this wonky log cabin quilt in its most simple form.  My main aim was to show you that you don’t have to use foundation piecing.  This simple rectangular quilt can be made with normal piecing – and it’s great fun.  I used it as a scrappy quilt and it ended up being a memory quilt as well.  As I rummaged through my stash I came across some lovely fabrics that I had forgotten about.

The quilt measures about 57″ by 74″, requiring twelve blocks which are 17″ square finished size.  I used about 2.1/2 yards of the grey background fabric together with about 8 red strips (3/4 yard), 14 blue strips (1 yard) and a further 3.1/2″ strip of red for the central squares and 3/4 yard of a dark fabric for the border.  The strips are all 2.1/2″ wide, so that you can used jelly roll leftover strips if you wish.




Wonky log cabin quilt block

Wonky log cabin quilt block

Cutting requirements for the wonky log cabin quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  twelve red

2.1/2″ strips:  approximately 35 grey, 8 red and 14 blue

For the border you will need to cut seven 3.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric.

Make the first round

Begin with a red square

Begin with a red square

Log cabin blocks traditionally have a red square in the middle to represent the fire in the hearth of the log cabin.  I have used a red metallic fabric for this.  Sew a 3.1/2″ grey strip to the bottom of the square and a 5.1/2″ strip to the left hand side.

Cut a triangle off

Cut a triangle off

Place your ruler so that it runs from the bottom right hand corner of this section to a point 2″ up from the bottom left hand corner.  Cut this triangle shape off.

Add the remaining logs

Add the remaining logs

Now add a 5.1/2″ grey strip across the top and a 7.1/2″ strip down the right hand side of the red square.

The progression in the photo runs down the left hand side and then down the right hand side of the photo.  Cut a triangle from the left hand side, top and then right hand sides of the section.  In each case the triangle runs from one corner to a point 2″ from the next corner.  This completed section measures about 5.1/2″ or 6″ square.

Add the red strips

Add the red strips

Make the second round of logs

For the next round I have used red strips.  They are from stash so each side is different.  Begin with a strip across the bottom and then add strips in a clockwise direction around the section.

Speed piecing log cabin blocks

Speed piecing log cabin blocks

Speed piecing log cabin blocks

I am using speed piecing for the rest of the block so I am not specifying lengths here.  This involves taking one strip of red fabric and sewing several blocks to it.  Place the red strip with right side up and then place a block with right side down against the red strip.  When you reach the bottom of the block, place another block to butt up against the first block and continue sewing.  At the end of the strip repeat with another red strip until you have added another red strip to every block.  Separate the blocks by cutting across the strip between each block.  This means that you don’t have to measure and cut each strip so it saves a huge amount of time.

Trim the red strips

Trim the red strips

Continue until you have added red strips to all four sides of the section.  Trim a triangle from each edge.  In this case place your ruler to run from one corner to a point only 1″ from the following corner.  This section measures about 9″ or 9.1/2″ square.

One of the reasons that I have varied the size of the triangles is because I wanted the coloured frames to stand out well so that you can see how the block has built up clearly.  So I have taken 2″ triangles from the grey frames and 1″ triangles from the coloured frames.

Third round of logs

Third round of logs

Complete the wonky log cabin quilt blocks

For the next round of logs use 2.1/2″ grey strips.  Cut 2″ triangles from this round.  This section measures about 11″ square.

Add the blue strips

Add the blue strips

I have used blue strips for the fourth round of logs, cutting 1″ triangles from each edge.  At this stage the block measures about 13.1/2″ to 14″ square.

Add the grey strips

Add the grey strips

Make the final round of logs with grey strips.  Don’t cut any triangles from this round of logs.

As I was cutting triangles from the previous frames I wasn’t worrying too much about accuracy.  The final reckoning comes now with the final grey frame.  The edges of all my blocks varied between 17.1/2″ and 18″ long.  At this stage I trimmed all the blocks to 17.1/2″ square.  What size you use for your blocks doesn’t matter.  The important point is that all blocks need to be the same size as each other so that you can sew them together.

Sew the blocks in rows of three

Sew the blocks in rows of three

Assemble the wonky log cabin quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of three blocks.  Sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of a dark fabric to frame the quilt.  You’ll need two lengths of approximately 51.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of approximately 74.1/2″ for the sides.  Do measure your quilt edges as they may vary slightly from mine.

That completes the wonky log cabin quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Snow in my garden

Snow in my garden

I can’t bring you any travel photos this week as I have hardly left the house all week.  We haven’t had nearly as much snow as most parts of the UK, but I still didn’t feel it was worth risking slipping on icy pavements when I didn’t really have any urgent reason to leave the house.

I hope that wherever you live you are safe and warm.

 

Flamingo Quilt Pattern – Tropicana Fabrics

Flamingo quilt

Flamingo quilt

For the Flamingo quilt pattern I have used fabrics from a lovely new range called Tropicana by Fabric Freedom.  I have based the block on the golden gate quilt block, using twelve 18″ blocks sewn together in four rows of three.

The rectangular quilt measures 62″ by 80″.  I have used 1 yard of pink fabric, 1.1/2 yards of green, 1/2 yard of the flamingo fabric, 3/4 yard of the tropical leaves fabric, with 1 yard of the large leaves and 1.1/4 yards of the small leaves fabric.




Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the flamingo quilt

6.7/8″ squares:  twenty four pink, twenty four large leaves fabric

6.1/2″ squares:  twelve flamingo

6,1.2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  ninety six small leaves, forty eight green – cut sixteen and eight strips across the width of fabric for these

For the borders you will need fifteen 1.1/2″ green strips and eight 2.1/2″ tropical leaves strips, all cut across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangles

Use the 6.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a pink and a large leaves square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Mark a seam along one diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are now 6.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the pink triangle and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the stripey blocks

Make the stripey blocks

Make the stripey blocks

Sew together 2.1/2″ strips of green and small leaves fabric for this block.  Use a light fabric on either side with a dark fabric in the middle.

Cut these panels at 6.1/2″ intervals to make 6.1/2″ squares.  You need four of these for each block – forty eight in total.

Flamingo quilt block layout

Flamingo quilt block layout

Make the flamingo quilt block

The block itself is very easy to make – a simple nine patch block.

Place a flamingo block in the middle with a stripey block on each edge of the central square.  Place these so that in two of them the stripes are horizontal while in the other two they are vertical.  This way they form a frame around the central square.

Place a half square triangle unit in each corner of the block, always with the pink on the outside forming the corners of the block.  The pink was chosen to tie in with the flamingoes and has the lovely name of Hot Pink!

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows together.  The blocks measure 18.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make twelve of them.

Assemble the flamingo quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of three.  The blocks are symmetrical so it doesn’t matter which way you sew them unless like me you are using a directional fabric.  I made sure that I kept the flamingoes standing the right way up when I sewed the blocks together.

Three quilt borders

Three quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

I had intended to use one border only.  However I decided that the quilt deserved more of a frame so I ended up with three borders.

I made the first border using 1.1/2″ strips of green:  two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 74.1/2″ for the sides.

For the second border I used 2.1/2″ strips of a new fabric called Tropical Leaves.  I needed two lengths of 56.1/2″ for top and bottom with two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally for the third border I returned to the 1.1/2″ strips of green – two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 80.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Flamingo quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Stepping stones

Stepping stones

I was asked for an image of the stepping stones in my garden so here it is.  Apologies for the shadow of the friend with his spade who helped me – I didn’t notice it till this morning.

They mean that I should be able to walk to my workshop in the winter without my feet sinking in to soggy grass.

New shop design

Now the big news this week is that I have a new home page on my shop.  It was suggested to me by the people who run the shopping cart side of things.  It was terribly stressful when they began work because they were emphasising what I thought were all the wrong things and using photos from the internet rather than my own photos.  Luckily we managed to agree things eventually and I am thrilled with the results – much more professional looking than it used to be.

 

Nine Patch Jelly Roll Quilt Pattern

Nine patch jelly roll quilt

Nine patch jelly roll quilt

For this nine patch jelly roll quilt I wanted to make the entire quilt using just one jelly roll.  I nearly succeeded, only needing to add two strips of fabric from stash for the final border.  However, I know that jelly rolls do vary in the number of strips of fabric, so you may be able to complete this quilt with just the jelly roll.

There are lots of jelly roll quilt patterns, but I find that very often they require a jelly roll plus a lot of extra fabric.  The target that I set myself here was to use one jelly roll only.




Computer image to show the quilt design

Computer image to show the quilt design

If you haven’t come across jelly rolls before, they are rolls of fabric cut to 2.1/2″ wide and the strips all come from one fabric manufacturer so they usually all go together well.  It’s a great way of getting a wide variety of fabric without having to buy individual quantities of each fabric.  Although the strips are always the same width, the number of strips within a jelly roll can vary.

Because the fabrics vary so much, I have included a computer image of the quilt here using just a few colours so that you can see the quilt design more clearly.

Sort the fabric strips

Sort the fabric strips

Preparing the fabric

I began by sorting the strips into broadly dark, medium and light strips.  In fact I used the medium strips as either dark or light depending on what I needed and I also used them for the borders.

Make the stripey block

Make the stripey block

Make the stripey block

Sew together three strips of fabric in dark, light, dark colours.  This made a panel 6.1/2″ wide by the length of the strips.  Cut this at 6.1/2″ intervals to make a simple 6.1/2″ square.  This is the stripey block.  You should get six of these from each panel.  I found that I could also cut one 2.1/2″ strip from each panel.

Make the nine patch quilt block

Make the nine patch quilt block

Making the nine patch quilt block

For this block I needed panels of dark, light, dark fabric as above, but also some light, dark, light panels of fabric.  Cut these at 2.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles of fabric 2.1/2″ wide by 6.1/2″ long.

Place two dark, light, dark strips of fabric with a light, dark, light strip between them as shown in the top right of the photo.  Sew these three strips together to make the nine patch jelly roll quilt block.

Completed blocks

Completed blocks

The completed blocks

Both these quilt blocks are 6.1/2″ square at this stage.  You need to make twenty four of the stripey blocks and thirty nine of the nine patch jelly roll quilt blocks.

In order to do this, I needed to make nine panels of dark, light, dark fabric together with three panels of light, dark, light fabrics.

First three rows of the nine patch jelly roll quilt

Sew the blocks together in nine rows of seven blocks.

First three rows

First three rows

The first row is made with a stripey block at each end and five nine patch blocks between them.  Note that the left hand stripey block is placed with the stripes horizontal while the other stripey block has the stripes vertical.

In the second row the blocks are reversed, with a nine patch block at each end and five stripey blocks between them.  Note that the stripey blocks alternate between horizontal and vertical placements.

For the third row place a three nine patch blocks in the middle with a vertical stripey block either side of them and a nine patch block at each end.

Central area

Central area

Central area of the quilt

The next four rows are very similar to each other.  Each row has three nine patch blocks in the middle and a nine patch block at each end.  Place the stripey blocks in the second and sixth places of each row.

The stripey blocks alternate down the column, beginning with a horizontal block, then vertical beneath it and so on.  This is the only difference between the rows.

Last two rows

Last two rows

Final two rows of the nine patch jelly roll quilt

The last two rows are similar to the first two rows.  For row eight place a nine patch block at each end with five stripey blocks between them.  In row nine place a stripey block at each end with five nine patch blocks between them.  Check whether the stripey blocks are horizontal or vertical.  My intention with the corner blocks was to have them form a sort of circle around the quilt – that’s why they are placed both horizontally and vertically.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows together.  At this stage the quilt top measures 42.1/2″ by 54.1/2″.

Leftover fabric

Leftover fabric

Make the top and bottom quilt borders

Now my target was to use up the remainder of the jelly roll strips for the borders.  I had six complete strips of fabric and some 6.1/2″ strips left.  Note that you may have a different amount left over as jelly rolls do vary.

Top and bottom borders

Top and bottom borders

I decided to make three borders for the top and bottom of the quilt.

For the first border I used a strip of light fabric.  In the second border I used seven of the 6.1/2″ strips – that’s twenty one squares altogether.

I made the third border with a strip of medium fabric.  Sew the three strips together and sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.

Add the side borders

Add the side borders

Make the side borders

By now I was really running short of fabric strips!  I had one light strip left which I didn’t want to use for these borders.  I cut two medium 2.1/2″ strips from my stash and used them with the remaining medium strip and a few individual squares of medium fabric to make two 66.1/2″ lengths for the sides.

That completes the nine patch jelly roll quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Peckforton Castle

Pckforton Castle

My travels last week took me into Staffordshire to somewhere called Peckforton Castle.  What a treat that was!  It’s a genuine castle, although not as old as many of our castles.  It was built in the mid 19th century by a railway magnate for his family.  Outside it looks centuries old but inside there are all mod cons – and two lovely restaurants.

 

Grandmothers Choice Quilt Pattern

Grandmothers choice quilt

Grandmothers choice quilt

For the Grandmothers Choice quilt I have used two different blocks to create a quilt that could be suitably masculine in some colour choices or delightfully feminine in different colour choices.  The quilt is rectangular and is rather large at 64″ by 94″, using twenty four blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.  To complete the quilt I used 1.3/4 yards of white, 2.1/4 yards of brown and 2.3/4 yards of yellow fabric.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the grandmothers choice quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  seventy two brown, forty eight white

6.1/2″ squares:  forty eight brown

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  forty eight yellow

6.7/8″ squares:  twenty four white, twenty four yellow

For the border you will need to cut eight 2.1/2″ yellow strips across the width of fabric.

Grandmothers choice quilt block

Grandmothers choice quilt block

Make the grandmothers choice quilt block

Definitely an easy one this!  Place a 6.1/2″ brown square in each corner with a 3.1/2″ brown square in the middle.  Between each pair of corners place a yellow rectangle.  Sew the pieces together to form three rows and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  You need to make twelve of these.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangles

Use the 6.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a yellow and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 6.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the yellow and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the alternate block

Alaska Homestead quilt block layout

Alaska Homestead quilt block layout

For the alternate block I have chosen the Alaska Homestead quilt block.  Lay the squares out as shown with a half square triangle in each corner and a 3.1/2″ brown square in the middle.  Place the triangles so that the white is always on the outside, forming the corners of the block.

Between each pair of corners place a brown square and a white square.  As you can see, that means that the central cross is made of alternating brown and white squares.

Sew the rows to each other

Sew the rows to each other

In the first and third rows you need to sew the two small squares together first.  Then sew the pieces together across the rows.  The second row is straightforward – just sew all the squares together across the row.

Sew the rows to each other to complete the alternate block.  You need to make twelve of these.

Rows 1 and 6

Rows 1 and 6

Assemble the grandmothers choice quilt

The blocks are sewn together in six rows of four.  Each row contains two grandmothers choice block and two alternate blocks.  Rows one and six are made with an alternate block at each end and two grandmothers choice blocks between them.

Rows 2 - 5

Rows 2 – 5

The blocks are reversed for rows 2, 3, 4 and 5, with a grandmothers choice block at each end and two alternate blocks between them.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Make the border with 2.1/2″ strips of yellow fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 94.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Bourneville pavilion

Bourneville pavilion

After all my gardening last week, I needed a trip to the tip to take all my garden clippings.  I have to go through a part of Birmingham called Bourneville – which of course is where all the chocolate is made.  I will go to Cadbury World one day and show you some photos, but on this particular day it was the Pavilion that struck me.

Bourneville pavilion - side view

Bourneville pavilion – side view

When the boys were young I took them to cricket grounds all over the country for their games, but I don’t remember ever seeing such a beautiful pavilion as this one.  Before you ask, yes it was raining when I took these photos.  You can see the rain spots on the top photo!