New Waterwheel Quilt – Free Pattern

New waterwheel quilt

New waterwheel quilt

The New Waterwheel quilt is far larger than I had intended it to be.  It ended up measuring 85″ by 112″, large enough for a king size bed with some left over either to drape down the sides to wrap around the pillow.  The blocks are large and very simple, so the quilt went together really quickly.

I have used twelve 27″ blocks, half in blue and white with the other half in red and white.  The fabric required is 1.1/2 yards of light blue, 2 yards of red, 2.1/4 yards of dark blue, and 4 yards of white fabric.




Cutting requirements for the New Waterwheel quilt

9.7/8″ squares:  twelve red, twelve dark blue, twenty four white

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty red, twenty four white

9.1/2″ squares:  six light blue

3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  twenty four red, forty eight dark blue, seventy two white – read the pattern before cutting these as they can be made using strip piecing

For the border you will need to cut nine 2.1/2″ strips of light blue across the width of fabric.

Sew the triangles together

Sew the triangles together

Make the new waterwheel quilt block

Use the 9.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  As the squares are quite large I have not made them in pairs, but just cut each square along the diagonal and then sewn a white triangle to either a red or a blue triangle.

Make the striped sections

Make the striped sections

For the striped sections of the blocks I have saved time by using strip piecing.  For the new waterwheel block sew together 3.1/2″ strips of white, red, white along the length.  Cut these panels at 9.1/2″ intervals to create 9.1/2″ squares.

Central section

Central section

For the central section of the block make a nine patch unit of red and white squares.  The top and bottom rows are 3.1/2″ squares of red, white, red while the middle row uses white, red, white squares.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

New waterwheel quilt block layout

New waterwheel quilt block layout

Assemble the full quilt block

Lay the sections out in three rows of three.  Place the nine-patch in the middle with a red/white half square triangle in each corner.  Make sure that the red triangles are on the outside, forming the corners of the block.  Between each pair of corners, place a striped block.  These should form a frame around the central area – the top and bottom ones are laid horizontally while the side ones are placed vertically.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block measures 27.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make six of them.

Alternate quilt block layout

Alternate quilt block layout

Make the alternate block

The alternate block has most of the same elements as the new waterwheel block.  It is even easier to make because there is no nine patch in the middle – just a plain light blue square.

The striped blocks are made in exactly the same way as above, but using dark blue, white, dark blue strips.  Place the light blue square in the middle with a blue/white half square triangle in each corner, blue on the outside.  Place the striped blocks so that the stripes point away from the middle, rather than framing the middle.  Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

The alternate block measures 27.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make six of them.

Rows one and four

Rows one and four

Assemble the new waterwheel quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of three.  Rows one and four are the same as each other.  Place a blue block in the middle with a red block on either side of it.

Rows two and three

Rows two and three

Rows two and three are the same as each other.  Place a red block in the middle with a blue block on either side.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

I just wanted a small border for this quilt because it is so large, so I used 2.1/2″ strips of the light blue fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 81.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 112.1/2″ for the sides.  The new waterwheel quilt top is now finished and ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Waddesdon Manor

Waddesdon Manor

Recently I visited Waddesdon Manor, near Aylesbury.  It’s a magnificent property, built originally for the Rothschild family, along with equally lovely parkland.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.

Tom and Anna

Tom and Anna

And of course last weekend was the wedding of my second son Tom to the lovely Anna.

The church had been recently refurbished and was beautiful, the cake was carrot and banana and was delicious.  My daughter was a bridesmaid and was also beautiful.

 

My daughter as bridesmaid

My daughter as bridesmaid

Wedding cake

Wedding cake

Heytesbury Church

Heytesbury Church

My granddaughter

My granddaughter

My eldest son with my grandaughter.

 

Diamonds Are Forever Quilt Pattern

Diamonds are Forever quilt

Diamonds are Forever quilt

My Diamonds are Forever quilt has been named in honour of my son’s wedding this weekend.  I have used two different quilt blocks with various colour variations to provide diamonds in both the overall quilt design and in some of the blocks.  Please don’t think that it looks too complicated – each block is actually very simple to make.

The quilt is rectangular, measuring 64″ by 70″, so it would be suitable for a double bed or a throw.  I have used twenty five blocks which are all 12″ square finished size.  For the quilt top I needed 2 yards each of green and white, 1 yard of purple and 3/4 yard each of lilac and yellow.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the Diamonds are Forever quilt

2.7/8″ squares:  ninety eight purple, forty eight green, one hundred and fifty white, four yellow

4,7.8″ squares:  twenty four purple, two yellow, twenty six lilac

2.1/2″ squares:  one hundred white

8.1/2″ squares:  twelve green

For the borders you will need to cut three 3.1/2″ yellow strips, seven 2.1/2″ green strips, all across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

You need to make these using both the 2.7/8″ squares and the 4.7/8″ squares.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units.  Trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.  In the 2.7/8″ squares, place white with either purple or green.  For the 4.7/8″ squares, place lilac with either purple or yellow.

First quilt block layout

First quilt block layout

Make the first block

My original intention had been to use a green/white four patch in the middle of this block.  However I felt that it made the quilt look too busy so I changed it for one green square.  As I had already cut the fabric, it meant that I had lots of 4.1/2″ green strips cut – that’s why in the full quilt you’ll see that I have sometimes used two 4.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ green rectangles instead of one 8.1/2″ square.

Place a green 8.1/2″ square in the middle.  On each edge of this square place two purple/white half square triangles with a 2.1/2″ white square on either side of them.  Place the purple triangles together so that they form a larger purple triangle always pointing away from the middle.  In each corner place a purple/white half square triangle with the purple triangle on the outside, forming the corner of the block.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew together the four squares above and below the green square and then sew them to the green square.  Join together all the squares down each side to form two columns of six squares.  Sew these to the central section to complete the block.

At this stage the block measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make twelve like this.

Make the second quilt block

The second block is very similar to the first block, but I have created a diamond in the middle instead of a square.

Second block layout

Second block layout

Place four lilac/purple half square triangles (made from 4.7/8″ squares) in the middle.  Lay them so that the purple triangles lie in the middle, forming a purple diamond.

Place two green/white half square triangles and a white square on each edge of this central square.  Place them so that the green triangles together form a larger triangle pointing away from the middle.  Add a purple/white half square triangle in each corner with the purple on the outside.

As you can see, the outer frame of the block is the same as the one in the first block, but with green triangles instead of purple forming the diamond behind the central square.

Sew the four large half square triangles together first to form a square.  Then continue as for the first block.  At this stage the block measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make eight of them in this colour selection.

Central block

Central block

Make the central block

The central block is the same as the basic second block, but with lilac/yellow half square triangles forming a yellow diamond in the middle rather than a purple one.

You need to make only one of this block.

One more variation

In order to emphasise the diamond theme of this quilt, I have created one further colour variation.   These blocks I have placed in the middle of each edge, at the tips of the overall diamond formed by the purple blocks in the quilt design.

Last layout variation

Last layout variation

The layout for the block is the same as for the basic second block, but with the substitution of two yellow/white half square triangles for two of the green/white ones.  This block also measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Rows 1 and 2

Rows 1 and 2

Assemble the Diamonds are Forever quilt

Sew the blocks together in five rows of five blocks.  Row 1 consists of one purple block with substituted yellow triangles in the middle.  Rotate this so that the larger yellow triangle points upwards.  Place two green blocks on either side.

For row 2 place a green block at each end with three purple blocks in the middle.

Row 3

Row 3

Row 3, the central row, is made with a yellow diamond block in the middle.  Place a purple block on either side of this.  At each end place a purple block with substituted yellow triangles,  Rotate these so that the yellow triangles point to each side away from the middle.

Rows 4 and 5 are similar to rows 1 and 2.

Rows 4 and 5

Rows 4 and 5

In row 4 place a green block at each end with three purple blocks in the middle.  In row 5 place the last purple block with substituted yellow triangles in the middle.  Rotate this so that the yellow triangle points downwards, away from the middle.  Lay two green blocks on either side.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add yellow to top and bottom

Add yellow to top and bottom

Add the quilt borders

I wanted this quilt to be rectangular, so I have added 3.1/2″ strips of yellow to the top and bottom of the quilt, but not to the sides.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″.

For the final border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of green fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 70.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Diamonds are Forever quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Tomorrow my son is getting married to Anna.  No travel news this week as I have been busy finishing the bunting and my jacket for the wedding.  With my next pattern I hope to bring you lots of travel and wedding photos.

 

Piano Keys Star Quilt Free Pattern

Piano Keys Star quilt

Piano Keys Star quilt

When I designed the Piano Keys Star quilt my original intention was to place a piano keys border around each block.  However as I went along I decided to use the piano keys sections as sashing rather than complete borders around each block.

I had hoped to create a look where the light blue background to the star blocks blended with the light blue piano keys, while the dark blue plain blocks blended with the dark blue piano keys.  I think that I have achieved this.

I’ve used ten simple star blocks with ten plain squares, all 9″ square finished size.  The piano keys sections are 3″ by 9″ finished size and I made thirty of them.

The quilt measures 49″ by 61″, another rectangular quilt.  I have used 1 yard of red, 1.1/2 yards of light blue and 1.3/4 yards of dark blue fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Quilt components

Quilt components

Cutting requirements for the piano keys star quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  ten dark blue, forty light blue, twelve red

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty dark blue, twenty light blue

9.1/2″ squares:  ten dark blue

1.1/2″ strips:  fifteen light blue, twelve dark blue – all cut across the width of fabric

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ of red across the width of fabric.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a light blue and a dark blue square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the dark blue and clip the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Star quilt block layout

Star quilt block layout

Make the star quilt blocks

I’ve used a very simple nine patch star quilt block pattern.  Place a dark blue square in the middle and a light blue square in each corner.  Place a half square triangle unit in each of the remaining spaces.  Check the photo to be sure that you have them placed correctly.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block measures 9.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make ten of them.

Make three panels

Make three panels

Make the piano keys sections

Sew together five light blue and four dark blue 1.1/2″ strips.  This will give you a panel 9.1/2″ wide and around 42″ long.  Make three of these panels.  Cut the panels at 3.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″.  You will need thirty of these.

Basic rows of the quilt

Basic rows of the quilt

Assemble the piano keys star quilt

Each row of the quilt contains two star blocks, two dark blue plain squares and three piano keys sections.  Each sashing row contains four sashing strips and three red cornerstone squares.

Make three rows as the top row shown, with star, plain, star, plain blocks.  Make four of the sashing rows shown in the middle of the photo.  You need to make just two of the final row shown with plain, star, plain, star blocks.

Sew the blocks together across each row.  Sew the rows together alternating the star rows with the plain block rows and placing a sashing row after every row.

Use red for the border

Use red for the border

Add the piano keys star quilt border

I have used simple 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric to tie in with the red cornerstones.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt with two lengths of 61.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the piano keys star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Washington DC

Washington DC

I have finally written up the Washington part of my American trip.  To see the photos you can click here or click on the photo.

Hawaiian quilt

Hawaiian quilt

I have also been busy finishing quilts and I have found it really satisfying.  I began with a couple of wall hangings that have been waiting in the UFO pile for quite a while.  For this Hawaiian quilt I used a blanket stitch machine embroidery to edge the palm trees.

Sunflower wall hanging

Sunflower wall hanging

I am really pleased with the Sunflower wall hanging.  I drew three petals in each triangle and then sewed each petal shape with a second petal echo quilted just inside the first one.  It’s a very simple design but looks great, I think.

Before the next quilt pattern in two weeks’ time I will write a full article showing you how I have finished various projects.  I’m not suggesting that my quilting is the right way, but I hope that it will give you ideas for your own quilting.

Quarter Log Cabin Quilt – Free Pattern

Quarter log cabin quilt

Quarter log cabin quilt

The quarter log cabin quilt pattern is just what it says – blocks made in the traditional log cabin style but representing only one quarter of a completed log cabin block.  This allows you far more freedom to rotate the blocks, allowing many new design options.  In this rectangular quilt design I have put the blocks together to make one complete log cabin block with half and three quarter log cabins around it.

The quilt measures 52″ by 68″, using 3/4 yard each of dark blue and medium blue, together with 1 yard of light blue and 1.1/4 yards of white fabric.  I have used thirty six blocks which are 8″ square finished size.




Cutting requirements for the quarter log cabin quilt

2.1/2″ squares:  thirty six dark blue, thirty six medium blue

4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six medium blue, thirty six light blue

6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six light blue, thirty six white

8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six white

For the borders you will need to cut 2.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric:  three each in medium blue, light blue and white.  You will need to cut seven strips in dark blue.

Sew together two strips

Sew together two strips

Make the quarter log cabin quilt block

The first part of the block can best be made using strip sewing.  Sew together a strip of dark blue and one of medium blue.  Cut these strips at 2.1/2″ intervals. This gives you rectangles 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ which are basically a square each of the two blues.

Add a strip on the left

Add a strip on the left

Lay down one of these rectangles with the dark blue square at the bottom.  Sew a 4.1/2″ medium blue square to the left hand side.  This forms the first frame around the dark blue.

As you can see, the dark blue square is only framed on two sides, whereas in a full log cabin block it would have a medium blue frame on all four sides.

Add the light blue frame

Add the light blue frame

Now add a 4.1/2″ light blue strip to the top.  Sew a 6.1/2″ light blue strip to the left hand side.

Add the final frame

Add the final frame

For the final frame I have used white patterned fabric.  Sew a 6.1/2″ white strip to the top.  Add an 8.1/2″ strip to the left hand side.

That completes the quarter log cabin quilt block.  It measures 8.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make thirty six of them.

Assemble the quarter log cabin quilt – first three rows

First three rows

First three rows

Sew the blocks together in six rows of six.  I’m showing the rows three at a time for the sake of clarity.

I find it most simple to concentrate on the dark blue squares so that I can see which way to rotate the blocks.

Row one contains three pairs of blocks – with the dark blue at the bottom right and bottom left.  This way the dark blue squares form three rectangles.

In row two place the dark blue squares top right, bottom right twice, bottom left twice and then top left.  At each side you can now see the corner frame formed with three dark blue squares.

For the third row place the dark blue bottom right three times and then bottom left for the remaining three blocks.

Rows four, five, six

Rows four, five, six

Remaining three rows

In the second three rows the design is similar but the other way up.

For row four place the dark blue squares top right three times and then top left three times.

In row five place the dark blue bottom right, top right twice, top left twice and then finally bottom left.

Lay the blocks in row six in three pairs – one top right and one top left within each pairing.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the main section of the quilt top.

Borders for top and bottom

Borders for top and bottom

Add the quilt borders

I’ve used all the colours in the borders and have made the quilt rectangular by using bigger borders for the top and the bottom.

Both panels are made using dark blue, medium blue, light blue and white fabrics followed by an additional dark blue strip.  For each one the colours fade from dark blue to white away from the quilt.  This means placing the panels with white near the top on the first panel and near the bottom on the second panel.

Make two panels 48.1/2″ long and sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.

Add the side borders

Add the side borders

Finally add a 68.1/2″ dark blue strip to each side of the quilt.

That completes the quarter log cabin quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Palace in Oslo

Palace in Oslo

Last week I promised you some details of my trip to Oslo.  There were too many to tack on to this pattern so I have written a complete article with lots of photos.  You can see it in Visiting Oslo.

Rainbow Medallion Quilt Pattern

Rainbow medallion quilt

Rainbow medallion quilt

The Rainbow Medallion quilt is a big, bright and cheerful rectangular quilt suitable for a double or queen sized bed.  I have used all the colours of the rainbow – Richard Of York Gained Battles In Vain.  I’ve begun with red in the middle, working out to violet on the outside.  The width of the strips also increases from 3″ finished size in the middle to 6″ strips for the violet fabric.

It measures 72″ by 82″ and I have used 1/4 yard each of orange and yellow fabrics, 1/2 yard each of red and green, 3/4 yard of blue, 1 yard of indigo, 1.1/4 yards of violet and 1.3/4 yards of white fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the rainbow medallion quilt

Red:  one 3.1/2″ square, eighteen 4.1/2″ squares

Orange rectangles:  two 3.1/2″ by 5.1/2″, two 3.1/2″ by 11.1/2″

Yellow rectangles:  two 4.1/2″ by 13.1/2″, two 4.1/2″ by 21.1/2″

Green rectangles:  two 4.1/2″ by 23.1/2″, two 4.1/2″ by 31.1/2″

Blue rectangles:  two 5.1/2″ by 33.1/2″, two 5.1/2″ by 43.1/2″

Indigo:  two 5.1/2″ by 45.1/2″, two 5.1/2″ by 55.1/2″

Violet:  two 6.1/2″ by 57.1/2″, two 6.1/2″ by 69.1/2″

White:  cut twenty three 1.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric, eight 2″ strips across the width of fabric, eighteen 4.1/2″ squares

Central area of the rainbow medallion quilt

Central area of the rainbow medallion quilt

Begin in the middle

Place the 3.1/2″ red square in the middle and sew 1.1/2″ white strips around it:  3.1/2″ above and below the square with 5.1/2″ strips down the sides.

Add the orange frame

Add the orange frame

Next add the orange frame.  Sew the 5.1/2″ rectangles to the top and bottom with the 11.1/2″ rectangles going down the sides.

Add a white frame using 11.1/2″ strips above and below the orange and 13.1/2″ strips down the sides.

Next add the yellow

Next add the yellow

For the yellow frame I have increased the width of strips to 4.1/2″.  Two lengths of 13.1/2″ for the top and bottom, two lengths of 21.1/2″ for the sides.  The white strips are 21.1/2″ and 23.1/2″ long.

The green frame

The green frame

Green comes next – I found a lovely William Morris print for this.  The width of rectangles has remained at 4.1/2″:  two lengths of 23.1/2″ and two lengths of 31.1/2″.   The white strips outside the green are 31.1/2″ and 33.1/2″ long.

Light blue for the next frame

Light blue for the next frame

Outer frames of the rainbow medallion quilt

Blue for battles – I have used a pretty light blue for this frame.  The width of the strips increases to 5.1/2″ for this frame.  You’ll need two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 43.1/2″ for the sides.

The white strips are 43.1/2″ and 45.1/2″ long.

Indigo frame

Indigo frame

Indigo covers quite a wide range of colours, but I have a colour from the same range as the light blue which I think looks like indigo.  The strips widths remain at 5.1/2″ and you need two lengths of 45.1/2″ and two lengths of 55.1/2″.  For the white strips you need two lengths of 55.1/2″ and two lengths of 57.1/2″.

Violet frame

Violet frame

Violet is the last colour of the rainbow.  I have increased the strip width to 6.1/2″ for this frame.  You’ll need two lengths of 57.1/2″ and two lengths of 69.1/2″ in violet.

For the white frame outside the violet I have increased the size slightly to 2″ strips.  You need two lengths of  69.1/2″ and two lengths of 72.1/2″.

I increased the white strip width because I wanted to add 4″  squares along the top and bottom of the quilt.  In order to do this I wanted to make the overall width 72.1/2″.  Then a strip of eighteen squares would fit exactly across the width.  I toyed with the idea of sewing strips of squares all round the quilt, but decided to add them on the top and bottom only so that my quilt would become rectangular rather than square.

Sew red and white strips together

Sew red and white strips together

Add the border

I used strip piecing to make the red and white squares.  Sew together 4.1/2″ strips of red and white and then cut this panel at 4.1/2″ intervals.  This gives you rectangles 8.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ containing one red square and one white square.

Add the border

Add the border

Sew these together side by side to make strips of alternating red and white squares.  You need to make two lengths of eighteen squares (nine pairs of squares).  Sew one strip to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.

Finally add a 1.1/2″ white strip at the top and one to the bottom.  That completes the rainbow medallion quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Holly's dragon

Holly’s dragon

I’m afraid that I’ve been working all week and haven’t got any travels to show you, so instead I thought I’d show you the dragon that I made for my grand daughter’s birthday.  It’s far too big for her, but I hope she’ll like it one day!

I made him from a kit that I bought at the Festival of Quilts and I think he’s gorgeous.

Anniversary Dog Quilt – Free Pattern

Anniversary dog quilt

Anniversary dog quilt

I’ve named the Anniversary Dog quilt after two totally different things.  The first is that the design comes from a wall in a restaurant that I went to in London last weekend.  I had been to watch the Anniversary Games held in the Olympic Stadium (more about that at the end of the page).  The second totally separate reason for the name is that I’ve used all the fabrics from a new range of dog fabrics that I have just bought.

The quilt is rectangular, measuring 49″ by 64″.  I’ve used twelve blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.  The fabric requirement is for 3/4 yard of each of five different fabrics with just 1/4 yard of light blue.  I’ve tried to call the fabrics in shades of blue rather than just the pattern on the fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the Anniversary Dog quilt

Light blue fabric (dog breeds):  thirty six 3.1/2″ squares

Medium blue fabric (words):  twelve 6.1/2″ squares, twelve 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles

Dark blue fabric (bones):  twenty four 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles

The wall that inspired the quilt design

The wall that inspired the quilt design

White fabric (dog silhouettes):  twelve 6.1/2″ squares, twelve 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles, twelve 3.1/2″ squares

Red fabric:  twelve 15.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ strips of a sixth fabric across the width of fabric.

The block is most easily made in two completely separate halves

Make the top half of the block

Top half of the block

Top half of the block

Begin with a 6.1/2″ medium blue square on the left.  Next to this place a white rectangle and a light blue square with a light blue square and a dark blue rectangle beneath them.

Sew the pieces across the two right hand rows and then sew the two rows to each other.  Sew this section to the square on the left.

It’s an incredibly simple design, but it just struck me as  delightful when I saw it on the wall.

Make the lower half of the block

Lower half of the block

Lower half of the block

This is very similar to the top half, but place the large 6.1/2″ square on the right this time.  Working from the left, place a light blue square and a dark blue rectangle with a medium blue rectangle and light blue square beneath them.  Place a large white square on the right.

Once again sew the rectangles to the small squares and then sew these two rows to each other.  Sew this panel to the white square on the right.

Completing the block

Add red sashing

Add red sashing

I had intended to sew these two sections of the block together to make a rectangular block, but when I put several of them together they just looked a muddle.  So I decided to add a red strip across the middle between the two sections.  I felt that this would help me give some structure to the quilt design.

It also makes the block square, although that was not my primary objective.

Sew a red sashing strip between the top and lower half of the block.

The block now measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make twelve of these.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the anniversary dog quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of three blocks.

In the first row the red stripes are all vertical.  I’m using the red stripes and the medium blue large squares to define how to place each block.  The blue squares are placed bottom left, bottom left and then top right.

Row two

Row two

For the second row, the red stripes are vertical then horizontal then vertical again.

Place the medium blue squares bottom left, bottom right and then top right.

Row three

Row three

In row three the red stripes are again vertical then horizontal and then vertical.  Place the medium blue squares bottom left, top left and then top right.

Row four

Row four

Finally for row four place the red stripes all vertically.  The medium blue squares lie bottom left, top right and top right.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border you will need to sew two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 64.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the anniversary dog quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

The Monument in London

The Monument in London

The Anniversary Games are held each year in the former Olympic Stadium in London.  Last weekend was the first time that I had visited the Stadium and it was a real treat to see some of the great stars of athletics in action.  Mo Farah is retiring this year so it was a privilege to see him running.

We also had time for some sightseeing and went to see the Monument which commemorates the Great Fire of London in 1666.  The tower was built a few years later to celebrate the re building of London and it still dominates the area even all these centuries later.

Havana Cathedral Quilt – Free Pattern

Havana Cathedral quilt

Havana Cathedral quilt

The Havana Cathedral quilt is based on a gorgeous stained glass window that I saw in the Cathedral when I was in Cuba recently.  I had intended to make a wall hanging, but somehow I’ve ended up with a queen size quilt pattern!  Each block is easy to make and they are big blocks so the quilt goes together quite quickly.  It’s also rectangular and would fit a queen size bed, so it ticks a lot of boxes.

The original stained glass window

The original stained glass window

Within the quilt I have used three blocks which are 18″ by 24″ finished size and six blocks which are 24″ squares.  The fabric requirements are 2 yards each of dark blue and red, 1.3/4 yards of light blue, 3/4 yard of white and 1/2 yard of medium blue.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the Havana Cathedral quilt

Completed Havana cathedral quilt block

Completed Havana cathedral quilt block

12.7/8″ squares:  twelve light blue, six red, six dark blue

4.3/4″ squares:  twelve medium blue

3.1/2″ squares:  twelve dark blue, twelve white

3.7/8″ squares:  eighteen each in dark blue and red, twelve each in light blue and red, six each in red and white.  These are for the half square triangles.  In addition you will need six dark blue, six white and twelve red squares for the diamond in a square blocks.

For the borders you will need to cut seven strips across the width of fabric in each of 2.1/2″ red, 1.1/2″ white and 2.1/2″ dark blue.

Make half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

You need to make half square triangles with some, but not all of the 3.7/8″ squares.  Use those squares listed in pairs above.

Place a red square right sides together  with either a light blue or a dark blue square.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line. Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Place triangles around the square

Place triangles around the square

Make diamond in square units

Cut the remaining 3.7/8″ squares along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square (shown in the top right of the photo).

Lay down a 4.3/4″ medium blue square and place a dark blue and a white triangle on two opposite edges, with two red triangles on the other two opposite edge.

Trim the edges

Trim the edges

Sew the dark blue and white triangles to the edges of the square first.

Press them open and then sew the two red triangles to the square.  When you press these open you’ll see that you have created a square with a medium blue diamond in the middle.  Trim the middle of each edge where the triangle tips stick out.  This is now a 6.1/2″ square.

Top half of the block

Top half of the block

Make the Havana Cathedral quilt block

This block is made of eight rows of six squares each – that’s counting the diamond in square units as equivalent to four squares.

I’ve shown the top four rows first.  In each corner place a dark blue square with a dark blue/red half square triangle beneath it.  In the middle place two diamond in a square units.  Lay them with the red triangles in the top middle to create a larger red triangle pointing downwards.

The third and fourth rows are made with dark blue/red half square triangles at each end and a light blue/red half square triangle inside them.  In the third row there are two white squares in the middle.   For the fourth row place two red/white half square triangles in the middle.

Lower half of the block

Lower half of the block

The lower half of the block is very similar.  Rows five and six are almost the same as rows three and four.  Just check which way to place the half square triangles.

Rows seven and eight are almost the same as rows one and two.  Again it is just the direction of the triangles that has changed.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the squares together across each row.  You need to make a double row at the top and bottom of the block.

Sew the dark blue square and red/dark blue half square triangles together first.  Then you can sew them to the diamond in a square units.

Sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It measures 18.1/2″ by 24.1/2″ at the moment.  You need to make three of these.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the alternate block

This is a huge block, but I felt that it gave the right feel to the surrounding area of the Havana Cathedral blocks.  It’s also dead easy to make!

Use the 12.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units. Use exactly the same method as above for the smaller half square triangle units.

Place two red/light blue half square triangles with two red/dark blue half square triangles as shown.  This makes one large red triangle, one large dark blue triangle and two large light blue triangles.  Sew them together in pairs and then sew the pairs together to create the block.  This is now a 24.1/2″ square and you need to make six of them.

As an aside, I had originally intended to make these blocks 18″ by 24″, same as the other blocks.  However the triangles were very odd sizes for this, so I opted for simplicity and made the blocks as  squares instead.

Rows 1 and 3

Rows 1 and 3

Assemble the Havana Cathedral quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Place the Havana Cathedral block in the middle of each row.

In rows 1 and 3 place the alternate blocks on either side with the dark blue triangle on the inside.

Row 2

Row 2

For row 2 the alternate blocks are rotated so that the light blue triangles lie on the inside.

On the left hand side the red triangle lies at the top while on the right hand side the blue triangle lies at the top.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Three quilt borders

Three quilt borders

Add the quilt border

I’ve used three borders to frame the quilt.  Make the first border with 2.1/2″ red strips.  Cut two lengths of 66.1/2″ for the top and bottom together with two lengths of 76.1/2″ for the sides.

The second border is made with 1.1/2″ strips of white fabric.  Two lengths of 70,1.2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally make the third border with 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue.  Two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 82.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Havana Cathedral quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Iris flowers

Iris flowers

One of the colour combinations that I love in quilts is purple and green.  Yesterday I visited a National Trust property with a wonderful garden.  These iris flowers were a gorgeous deep purple – just as beautiful as the fantastic William Morris designs within the property.

Wightwick Manor

Wightwick Manor

The house itself was Wightwick Manor which is a celebration of the Arts and Crafts Movement – absolutely beautiful both inside and outside.

 

San Marco Quilt – Free Pattern

San Marco quilt

San Marco quilt

The San Marco quilt is the result of a quick trip I took to Venice last week.  It’s the most beautiful, inspirational city:  I’ve added a link to my Venice photos at the bottom of the page – together with a short video of a gondolier serenading his passengers.  This quilt is based on a small portion of the incredible floor tile designs that I saw in the San Marco basilica.

The quilt is rectangular, measuring 67″ by 85″, and I have used 3 yards of grey fabric with 1.1/2 yards each of red and black.  I’ve made sixty three blocks, all 9″ square finished size.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

Floor tile mosaic

Floor tile mosaic

The combination of a plain square with a diamond in a square is quite common in these floor tiles – you can see it in diagonal lines at the bottom of this photo.  It formed the basis of many of the designs.

The fact that there are plenty of plain grey squares make it a simple and quick quilt to make.  I have added the red part of the quilt design to give it some pop.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the San Marco quilt

9.1/2″ squares:  twenty eight grey

6.7/8″ squares:  sixteen grey, fourteen red

5.3/8″ squares:  sixty black

3.7/8″ squares:  ten red, ten grey

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty grey, five red

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units for the stars

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a red and a grey square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the red fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Star quilt block layout

Star quilt block layout

Make the star quilt blocks

Lay the 3.1/2″ squares and the half square triangles out in a nine patch formation.  There’s a red square in the middle, a grey square in each corner and half square triangles in the remaining spaces.  Check the photo to be sure of getting the triangle placements correct.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  You need to make five of these star blocks.

Sew the triangles to the squares

Sew the triangles to the squares

Make the diamond in a square blocks

Cut the 5.3/8″ black squares along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square.  Lay a triangle on each edge of the central 6.7/8″ square.  Sew the top and bottom triangles to the square first.  Then press these open and sew the remaining two triangles in place.

Trim the triangle tips

Trim the triangle tips

You will see that there are triangle tips sticking out in the middle of each edge.  Trim these to reduce bulk when you’re sewing the blocks together.

You need to make sixteen of these blocks in grey on black together with fourteen blocks in red on black.

The other block required is a plain 9.1/2″ grey square.

First three rows

First three rows

Assemble the San Marco quilt

Sew the blocks together in nine rows of seven blocks.  I’ll show you the rows three at a time.  In the first and third rows place the plain grey squares in positions one, three, five and seven.  The second row contains grey squares in positions two, four and six.  Place a red diamond in square in the middle of the first row with two red diamonds diagonally below it in row two.  Continue the diagonal lines with two red diamonds in row three.  Fill the remaining spaces with grey diamonds – two each in rows one and two with just one in the third row.

Rows four to six

Rows four to six

Rows four to six form the central area of the quilt.  Place a star in the middle of rows four and six, with three stars in row five.

There are two plain grey squares in each of these rows, together with two grey diamonds in each row.  The red diamonds appear twice in each of rows four and six but there are none of them in row five.

Rows seven to nine

Rows seven to nine

Finally, rows seven to nine are very similar to rows one to three.

The red diamonds are now forming a V shape to complete the overall diamond shape begun in the top of the quilt.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 63.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 85.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the San Marco quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Venice

Venice

Last week I had a magical few days in Venice.  I had so many photos that I’ve written a separate article about the gorgeous city.  Click here to see my photos and a very short video of a singing gondolier.