Friendship Bouquet Wall Hanging Pattern

Friendship bouquet wall hanging

Friendship bouquet wall hanging

The Friendship Bouquet quilt block was a request.  It is such a pretty block that I decided to make four of them to form a wall hanging.  At first glance it looks quite a complicated block, but as usual it is far more simple when you look at it in small sections.  I also liked the name of the block – warm and friendly for this time of year.

The wall hanging measures 26″ square and I used four blocks which are 11″ square finished size.  I needed 1/2 yard of purple batik together with 1/4 yard each of yellow, gold, green and lilac.




Completed friendship bouquet quilt block

Completed friendship bouquet quilt block

Cutting requirements for the friendship bouquet wall hanging

5.7/8″ squares:  four purple

3,3/4″ by 6.1/8″ rectangles:  four yellow – cut these with fabric folded in two layers

3.3/8″ squares:  twelve yellow

2.7/8″ squares:  twenty four purple

1.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangles:  eight gold, eight lilac

5.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ rectangles:  eight gold

9.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ rectangles:  four gold

11.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ rectangles:  four gold

For the border you will need to cut three 2.1/2″ strips of green across the width of fabric.

Add a triangle on each edge

Add a triangle on each edge

Make the diamond in square sections

Cut the 2.7/8″ purple squares across one diagonal to make two triangles from each squares.  Place one triangle on each edge of the 3.3/8″ yellow squares.

Sew triangles two at a time

Sew triangles two at a time

Sew the triangles to the squares two at a time.  On the left of the photo you can see the side triangles sewn in place.  The right hand part of the photo shows those two triangles pressed open.

Add the next pair of triangles

Add the next pair of triangles

Now the two triangles at top and bottom can be sewn to the squares.

Trim the triangle ends sticking out in the middle of each edge and trim the entire block to 4.1/2″ square.  Make twelve of these blocks.

Make the cone section

The handle or grip of the bouquet is formed by sewing two triangles to a 5.7/8″ square of purple fabric.

Forming the handle of the bouquet

Forming the handle of the bouquet

Cut the yellow rectangles along one diagonal to make two triangles from each rectangle.  Make sure that the fabric is folded in half the way it comes from the shop with wrong sides together.  This because for each block you need two triangles which are mirror images of each other.

Lay one of each triangle on the purple square, matching two edges with the edges of the square.  At this stage the triangles are right side up.  This is how you can check that you have the right triangle in each position.

Now flip one of the triangles so that it is right sides together with the purple square.  The top of the triangle should just stick out above the square while the bottom of the triangle should just stick out from the corner of the square.  Sew the triangle in place and cut off the excess purple triangle to the left of the seam.

Add the second triangle

I did try marking a chalk line along the edge of the triangle before I flipped it, but it didn’t really work for me.  You may find that helpful.  I found that making the edges of the triangle stick out a little at each end gave me the best position for the triangle before I sewed it.  These cones will not be beside each other in the finished wall hanging so it doesn’t matter if they are not exactly the same as each other.

Add the second triangle

Add the second triangle

Press the triangle open and lay the second triangle in place.  From left to right in the photo you can see the second triangle placed in position, the excess purple triangle cut off and then the final cone section completed.

Trim these cone sections to 5.1/2″ square and make four of them.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

There aren’t many half square triangles in this block!  Place a lilac 1.7/8″ square right sides together with a gold square.

Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the gold fabric and trim the block to 1.1/2″ square if necessary.

First part of layout

First part of layout

Assemble the friendship bouquet quilt block

For each block you need one cone section and three diamond in a square sections.

Place a lilac 4.1/2″ strip between the top two diamond in a square blocks.  Place one lilac strip above the bottom diamond in a square.

Make two rows

Make two rows

Sew the top three sections together to form one row.  Sew the lilac section to the bottom diamond in a square.  Then you can sew the cone section to the side to form another row.

Sew the rows to each other.

Top and bottom of the frame

Top and bottom of the frame

Add the outer frame

Make the outer frame of the friendship bouquet quilt block with 1.1/2″ gold strips and the half square triangle units.

For the top of the frame place a 4.1/2″ gold strip either side of a half square triangle.  Check the photo to make sure which way to place the half square triangle.

Add a 9.1/2″ gold strip to the bottom of the block.

Sides of the frame

Sides of the frame

The sides of the frame are formed in a similar way.

For the right hand side place a 5.1/2″ gold strip either side of a half square triangle unit.  Sew these together and then sew them to the block.  Add an 11.1/2″ gold strip to the left hand side of the block.

That completes the friendship bouquet quilt block.  Make four of these and trim them to 11.1/2″ square.

Rotate the blocks

Rotate the blocks

Assemble the friendship bouquet wall hanging

Lay the blocks out in two rows of two.  Rotate the blocks so that the cone always points into the corner.  You’ll also see the lilac square frame form around the middle of the wall hanging.  Sew the blocks together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of a green batik fabric to suggest leaves.

You’ll need two lengths of 22.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 26.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the friendship bouquet wall hanging.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

I am sure that you are very busy and won’t want to hear from me over the next week or two so I will not be posting another quilt pattern for two Fridays during the festive season.  My next full pattern will appear on Friday 5th January 2018 when I’ll be posting a new pattern and holding a new year sale.

So it just remains for me to wish you and your family a very Merry Christmas followed by a happy and healthy new year.  Thanks for your interest and support for my website over the course of the year.

Central Park Quilt – Wall Hanging

Central Park quilt

Central Park quilt

The Central Park quilted wall hanging is based on a photo that I took when I was in New York earlier this year.  I know that you are unlikely to want to re produce one of my holiday snaps, but I hope that this will give you some ideas on how you can create quilts based on a favourite photo.

The quilt measures 20″ by 30″ and I can’t really give you cutting requirements because mostly I used scraps to make it.  For the same reason there’s no special offer quilt this week, but I have decided to hold a general sale – 15% off all purchases over £5 for the next seven days.  Click on shop. No coupon needed:  the discount will be applied automatically at checkout.  As before, all quilt sale proceeds will be donated to Facing Africa.




Divide the backing into sections

Divide the backing into sections

The backing of the Central Park quilt

For the backing I have cut a rectangle of white fabric 20″ by 30″ – any fabric will do as this doesn’t show.  I have drawn a line at 10″ and at 20″, just to help me decide where to place everything.  It’s always best to divide your wall hanging into thirds rather than halves as it looks better.

Place the 1st strip right side up

Place the 1st strip right side up

Sewing the water

For the water of the reservoir I chose a selection of blues and cut them into strips of random widths – with the width varying across the strip so that they are more like wedges.

The first strip is placed right side up somewhere around the line one third of the way down the backing.  Pin in place.

Place the 2nd strip right side down

Place the 2nd strip right side down

The second strip is placed right side down on top of the first strip.  Match the lower edges and then sew 1/4″ from the lower edge.  Flip the second strip down and press.  Place the third strip right side down on the second strip, match the lower edges and sew in place.  Flip and press.  Keep going until you have reached the bottom of the backing fabric.

Pin the sky in place

Pin the sky in place

Adding the sky

For the sky I chose a light blue fabric with a small white pattern on it.  Cut a rectangle 20″ wide and as long as needed to meet up with the first blue strip.  This was about 11″ in my quilt.  Don’t worry about an exact fit against the blue strip – this part will be covered by the green fabric of the trees.

Make the buildings

Add the buildings

Add the buildings

For the buildings I used a rectangle of fabric about 9″ by 3.1/2″ and backed it with fusible interfacing.    I marked the buildings, cut them from the top part of the rectangle and pressed them to the right hand side of the Central Park wall hanging just above the first blue strip.  Again it doesn’t matter if the two pieces of fabric don’t quite butt up to each other – the join will be covered by the green fabric.

Cut the top of the strip for trees

Cut the top of the strip for trees

Add the trees

For the trees I used a green rectangle about 2.1/2″ by 20″ and backed it with fusible interfacing.  Working on the top of the strip, I cut a skyline of trees and curves to represent the trees and other vegetation.  On the right hand side, which would be in front of the buildings, I kept the curves fairly basic so that they wouldn’t cover the buildings.

Press in place across the top of the blue strip for the water and across the sky as well – hiding the raw edges of both.

Layer the Central Park quilt

Layer the quilt

Layer the quilt

At this stage I wanted to layer and quilt before I added the fountain.  In order to layer the quilt I used 21″ by 31″ rectangles of backing fabric and wadding.

For the sky I used a general meander quilting.  For the water I quilted scallops to represent the ripples.  I tried to keep the random look by making sure that the peaks and troughs were not directly under each other in the lines of quilting.

Quilt the wall hanging

Quilt the wall hanging

For the green strip of vegetation I used a very small satin stitch in a gold colour along both the top and bottom of the strip.  I used the same stitch but in black to outline the buildings.

For the sky and the water I used my free motion quilting foot, but for the satin stitch I used my walking foot.  Both of these allow the fabric to move under the quilting so that the fabric doesn’t pucker up.

Use organza for the fountain

Use organza for the fountain

Add the fountain

For the fountain I used a 12″ square of white organza fabric.  Any sheer fabric or netting would work just as well.  I managed to find some organza with glitter in it which was a bonus – it could look like the sun glinting off the water.

I rolled the fabric to make a denser section on the left hand side and then just folded and rippled the fabric for the rest of the fountain.  Finally I sewed it in place by hand.

New York skyline across the Jackie Onassis Reservoir

New York skyline across the Jackie Onassis Reservoir

Here’s the photo that I used as a basis for this Central Park quilt.  As I said above, I hope that it will give you some ideas for making your own quilted wall hangings from a photo.

Here’s the video:

Quinton church

Quinton church

This week I thought that I would show you a photo of Quinton Church.  It’s a lovely friendly church about a mile from where I live.

Polar Bear Stacking Quilt

Polar bear stacking quilt

Polar bear stacking quilt

The Polar Bear Stacking quilt is a bit of a fun for the end of the year – it’s really a quilted wall hanging and you could make it with different appliqued animals for the central area.  The idea is that you have a pile of animals piled on top of each other.  The animals often decrease in size as they go up the stack.  Quilters more clever than I am can manage to change the expression on the animals so that they bottom one looks hard done by and the top one looks triumphant.  I’m afraid that I can’t manage that.

The wall hanging measures 22″ by 26″ and I have used 3/4 yard of black fabric with 1/2 yard of white.  Actually the colour is nearer indigo than black, but the main point is to have a strong contrast between the two colours.




Cutting requirements for the polar bear stacking quilt

White fabric:  one rectangle 8″ by 15″, four 1.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric

Black fabric:  four 4.1/2″ squares, one rectangle 12.1/2″ by 16.1/2″, seven 1.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric.

Cut the polar bear outlines

Cut the polar bear outlines

Making the polar bear stacking quilt

You can download the polar bear templates here: large polar bear, small polar bear.  Print them and cut the outlines of the bears.  Press a fusible interfacing to the back of the white fabric rectangle.  Draw the polar bears on to the right side of the fabric.  You could trace these, or just fill in the face and other lines by looking at the template.

Press the polar bears on to the black fabric

Press the polar bears on to the black fabric

Cut the polar bears out and place them on the black rectangle with the smaller one on top and a slight overlap so that the chin of the top bear rests on the back of the lower bear.  Press to fuse these in place.

Sew the bears in place with satin stitch

Sew the bears in place with satin stitch

Using a small satin stich (I used stitch width 2 on my machine), sew the outline of the bears, the markings for the backs and legs and the outline of the faces.  I chose to leave the details of the faces until last.

For the border of the polar bear stacking quilt I have used a piano keys border – quite striking but simple to make.

Sew together strips of black and white

Sew together strips of black and white

Sew together four 1.1/2″ strips of fabric – two black and two white alternating.  Press and then cut at 4.1/2″ intervals to make squares.

Add the piano keys border

Add the piano keys border

Sew together two pairs of these squares and sew them to the top and bottom of the wall hanging.

For the sides you will need a 4.1/2″ black square at either end of a strip of three of the piano keys squares.  Sew these together to make two columns and sew one to each side of the wall hanging.

Add the final border

Add the final border

For the final border I have used 1.1/2″ strips of black.  You’ll need two lengths of 20.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 26.1/2″ for the sides.

Use black shapes first

Use black shapes first

Applique the polar bear faces

For the faces of the polar bears, I used white and black fabric backed with fusible interfacing.

Cut two circles for the noses, four shapes that are roughly eye shaped and two roughly triangular shapes for the ears.

Add white shapes

Add white shapes

Now add smaller white shapes to the eyes and ears to complete the faces.  Press these in place.  They will need sewing in place at some stage (when time allows!).

That completes the polar bear stacking quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

It just remains to wish you and your family a wonderful and joyous Christmas.  I have closed the fabric shop temporarily but rest assured that it will be back soon after Christmas.

Craftsy

House Wall Hanging Pattern

House wall hanging

House wall hanging

Well, what could be more appropriate than a house wall hanging pattern for the week in which I have moved to Birmingham!  There are loads of house quilt block patterns around, but I have made this block as simple as possible.  I’ve used the same colours in each block, but in fact you could use it as a scrappy project and use different colours in each block.  I have used four blocks for the house wall hanging, all 9″ square finished size and the house wall hanging itself measures 23″ square.

House quilt block

House quilt block

Cutting requirements for the house wall hanging

Green:  four 1.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips

Cream:  sixteen 1.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ strips, sixteen 1.1/2″ squares

White:  eight 1.1/2″ squares

Brown:  eight 2.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ strips, four 3.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ strips

Red:  four 3.1/2″ by 5.1/2″ rectangles, four 3.7/8″ by 2.7/8″ rectangles

Blue:  four 3.7/8″ by 2.7/8″ rectangles, eight 1.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ strips, four 1.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips

Black:  four 1.1/2″ squares, four 2.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ strips

Dark blue:  two 1.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips and one 1.1/2″ by 19.1/2″ strip for the sashing.  For the border you will need to cut 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue:  two lengths of 19.1/2″ and two lengths of 23.1/2″.

Make half rectangle triangles

Make half rectangle triangles

Making the blocks for the house wall hanging

Make half rectangle triangles with the blue and red 3.7/8″ rectangles.  Place the rectangles in  pairs with wrong sides together (as they are layered when you buy the fabric) and cut along one diagonal.

Match up red and blue triangles to re form a rectangle.  Flip one triangle over so that you can sew them together along the longest edge of the triangles.  Press the triangles open and trim the corners where the triangle tips stick out.  These half rectangle triangles are now 3.1/2″ by 2.1/2″.

House quilt block layout

House quilt block layout

Lay all the patchwork pieces out to form a house.  At the bottom you have a 9.1/2″ strip of green for the grass.

Above the green strip there are two sections for the windows with one section for the door in between them.  The window sections are made with two 3.1/2″ cream strips above and below the window, and two cream and one white 1.1/2″ squares forming the window itself.

Begin sewing the strips together across the rows

Begin sewing the strips together across the rows

The door section is made with a black 2.1/2″ strip for the door with a 2.1/2″ brown strip on either side and a 3.1/2″ brown strip across the top of the door.

For the roof of the house you’ll need the red rectangle with a half rectangle triangle on either side of it.

The chimney is made using a 1.1/2″ black square with a 4.1/2″ blue strip on either side, and the final strip is a 9.1/2″ blue strip for the sky.

Sew the rows to each other

Sew the rows to each other

Begin sewing the pieces together across the rows.  For the window sections you will need to sew the two lower rows together first so that they are the same size as the door section and then that row can be sewn together.

Finally sew all the rows to each other to complete the house quilt block.  You need to make four of these.

Join the blocks with sashing

Join the blocks with sashing

Assembling the house wall hanging

Sew the house quilt blocks together in pairs with a 9.1/2″ strip of dark blue sashing between them.  Sew the two pairs of blocks together with a 19.1/2″ strip of sashing between them.

House wall hanging border

House wall hanging border

For the border I have used slightly wider 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue.  You’ll need two lengths of 19.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 23.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the house wall hanging.  It can now be layered, quilted and bound as for any quilt.  Unusually for me, I have actually completed this wall hanging.  I used stitch in the ditch quilting between the blocks, cross hatch quilting for the roof in each block and a meander quilting across the sky and for the main body of the house – the cream fabric.  For the binding I have used the same red fabric as that used for the roof.

Here’s the video:

As you have obviously realised, I have moved house now.  We didn’t exchange contracts till 4 o’clock on Monday but were still able to move on Tuesday – well done to my solicitor!  I had hoped to write an article telling you all about my first impressions of Birmingham, but I don’t have a phone or broadband yet, so I’m making do with the free wifi in the library or some cafes.  I hope that by next week I will have plenty of photos for you to see.

Guitar Wall Hanging Pattern

 

Guitar wall hanging

Guitar wall hanging

Guitar wall hanging in different colour range

Guitar wall hanging in different colour range

The guitar wall hanging comes from one of my first quilt pattern designs for Fabric Freedom.  It was designed as a quilt, using 4″ finished size squares, but I have made it with 2″ finished size squares to make it into a wall hanging instead.  This way it ends up being 26″ square, a much more manageable size for a wall hanging.

The fabric options for the guitar wall hanging

The fabric range is called Musical Affair and it comes in three different colour selections.  Basically I have selected out the darkest fabrics to make the shape of the guitar and then used the lighter fabrics fairly randomly in the background.  The background placements show up better in the red option shown on the right.

The quilt pattern can only really be given as a row by row list of placements, so rather than me repeating the list here it makes more sense for me to direct you to the Fabric Freedom site.  My designs are the ones towards the bottom of the page.

Quilting on the guitar wall hanging

Quilting on the guitar wall hanging

Back view of the guitar wall hanging

Back view of the guitar wall hanging

Just change all the measurements to 2.1/2″ or 2.7/8″ squares and use a 1.1/2″ border if you want to make the guitar wall hanging.

Quilting the guitar wall hanging

As it’s a completed design, I can actually show you the way that I quilted it as well.  I wanted to keep the quilting simple, so I have used straight lines about 1″ apart along the length of the guitar itself.  The background was a meander quilting.

As usually happens, you can see the quilting better on the back of the quilt shown on the right.

I am not stocking all the fabrics in the Musical Affair range – just the green colour range.  You can see them here.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose