Sunflower Wall Hanging Pattern

Sunflower wall hanging

Sunflower wall hanging

I made the Sunflower Wall Hanging partly because it’s pretty and very appropriate for the time of year and partly to show you how easy it is to keep adding frames of triangles to a central square.  Below I have given details of two methods for calculating the size of the squares from which to cut the triangles.  I would also like to say a big thank you for all the lovely birthday wishes that I received last week. The wall hanging measures 31″ square and I have used 1/2 yard each of sunflower fabric and yellow background fabric together with 1/4 yard each of two other fabrics from the sunflower range.  

Central area

Central area

Cutting requirements for the sunflower wall hanging

Sunflower fabric: one 4.1/2″ square, three 4.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric for the border Yellow fabric:  two 3.3/4″ squares, two 6.1/2″ squares, two 12.1/4″ squares Turquoise fabric:  two 4.7/8″ squares Sunflower silhouette fabric:  two 8.7/8″ squares.

Fussy cut a sunflower

Fussy cut a sunflower

Cut the central square

Cut a 4.1/2″ strip of sunflower fabric and cut a square that gives a complete sunflower for the middle of the wall hanging.  You can do this with any suitable fabric and you can vary the size of this central square to suit the fabric.

One triangle on each edge

One triangle on each edge

Add the first triangles

Cut the 3.3/4″ squares along one diagonal to form triangles.  Place one triangle on each edge of the central square.

Sew two triangles in place and then press

Sew two triangles in place and then press

You need to sew these triangles to the square in pairs.  Sew the top and bottom triangles and press them open.  Press the seam allowances away from the square.  Then sew the remaining two triangles to the sides and press open. You’ll notice that each triangle is longer than the edge of the square.  Make sure that the triangles extend the same distance beyond the square on each side. Trim the middle of each edge where the triangle tips stick out and if necessary trim the square to 6.1/2″.

How to measure the triangles

How to measure the triangles

How to measure the triangles

Now what happens if you want to use a larger (or smaller) central square?  I use two different methods so that I can check up on myself.  The first method is a simple calculation.  Using a calculator, divide the size of the square edge (4.1/2) by 1.41.  Add 1/2″ to this measurement and cut the square to that size. For the second method I use a tape measure placed across the corner of my cutting mat.  I place the end of the measure on the top line and the 4.1/2″ mark on the right hand line of the mat.  Make sure that these two ends of the tape measure are both the same distance from the corner.  In this case they are both 3.1/4″ from the corner.  Add 1/2″ and you have the measurement of 3.3/4″ which I have used for the squares to make the first round of triangles. Personally I prefer the tape measure method because it gives the result in 1/8″ intervals whereas the calculator gives decimal figures.  Whichever way you use, I hope this will help you to make this design using any size of central square.

The second round

The second round

Add the second frame

In order to make the second round of triangles I have used another sunflower fabric.  Overall I have alternated sunflower fabrics with plain yellow so that you can see what I’ve done more easily.  This time the triangles are cut from 4.7/8″ squares.  Add them two at a time as before and trim the edges.  Your square should now measure 8.1/2″ on each edge.

Sew with the square on top

Sew with the square on top

One thing that I do find useful is to sew the triangles on with the triangle underneath and the square on top.  This means that you can see the stitch lines of the previous frame in the middle of each edge.  You can then make sure that the seam you are now sewing passes just across the corner of the previous seam.  This means that your diamonds keep their points as you build up the rounds.

Add yellow triangles

Add yellow triangles

Another yellow frame

For the next frame cut the triangles from 6.1/2″ yellow squares.  Place one on each edge of the square and sew them on two at a time as before. Trim the edges of the square, which should now measure 11.1/2″.

Third round

Third round

Add the black frame

I have used 8.7/8″ squares to make the triangles for the next round.  Sew the triangles to the yellow square.  Your square should now measure 16.1/2″ on each edge.

Add a final yellow frame

Add a final yellow frame

One final round of triangles

I had intended to finish the wall hanging with the black frame shown above, but I realised that the central square is upright at this stage.  I want it to finish on point, in a diamond shape, so I need one more round of triangles. Use triangles cut from 12.1/4″ yellow squares.  Trim your square to 23″ along each edge.

Sunflower border

Sunflower border

Add the border

I have used 4.1/2″ strips of the same sunflower fabric as that used in the middle for the border. You’ll need two lengths of 23″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 31″ for the sides. That completes the sunflower wall hanging top.  It can now be layered, quilted and bound as for any quilt.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section. Here’s the video: https://youtu.be/TFg7qW2HHGo

Telford

Telford

Thanks for all the comments on my new privacy policy.  I mentioned last week that I had been to a workshop to check that I am doing it correctly.  The workshop took place in Telford in one of the museums of the Ironbridge Gorge.  It’s a beautiful area and it was a lovely day.  This park area combined the new and the old beautifully.

Telford's Iron Bridge

Telford’s Iron Bridge

I would have loved to bring you a photo of Thomas Telford’s original Iron Bridge but it was shrouded in scaffolding while they do some major work on it.  However I managed to find an old photo of it that I took many years ago.  

Vote or no vote

Vote or no vote

This area really took my fancy.  It celebrates the fact that in February 1918 women were first given the vote in Parliamentary elections.  However not all women were allowed the vote – of approximately 160 women working in that area of Ironbridge Gorge at the time only 37 were given the vote.

Wonderful imagery

Wonderful imagery

Each one of those 37 women is remembered with an individual silhouette showing their name.  Wonderful imagery!

Pillar of friendship

Pillar of friendship

The Pillar of Friendship was created when a conference of Master Blacksmiths took place there.  Each panel represents one blacksmith’s idea of friendship.  That was really interesting.