Pinwheel Snail Trail Quilt Pattern

Pinwheel snail trail quilt

Pinwheel snail trail quilt

This pinwheel snail trail quilt pattern was quite easy to make and I love the way the design has turned out.  It’s another of those patterns than look quite complex but are quite easy to make.

The quilt measures 40″ square so it would make a good lap quilt or throw.  The blocks are all 12″ square finished size and I made five snail trail blocks with four pinwheel blocks.I’ve used 3/4 yard of lilac, 1 yard of purple and 1/2 yard of green fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the pinwheel snail trail quilt

2.5/8″ squares:  ten purple, ten green

3.7/8″ squares:  fifteen purple, fifteen lilac

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  ten lilac

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty purple

6.7/8″ squares:  eight purple, eight lilac

Cut the four patch units

Cut the four patch units

Make the four patch units

You could make these units by just sewing together two green and two purple 2.5/8″ squares.  I chose to strip piece them to save time.  Sew together a 2.5/8″ strip of purple and of green fabric along the length.  Cut this panel at 2.5/8″ intervals.

Four patch units

Four patch units

Place the resulting strips together in pairs with the purple squares diagonally opposite each other.  Sew the pairs of squares together to create the four patch units for the middle of the block.

Add the purple triangles

Add the purple triangles

First section of the snail trail quilt block

Cut a 3.7/8″ purple and lilac square in half along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square.  Lay two purple triangles on opposite sides of the four patch units and two lilac triangles on the other two sides.  This section should measure 6.1/2″ square.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a purple and a lilac square with right sides together.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line and you will produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the purple and trim the corners where fabric sticks out.  These are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Snail trail quilt block layout

Snail trail quilt block layout

Complete the snail trail quilt block

The central part of the block is now a square but the four patch in the middle has been turned on point so that it looks like a diamond.  Make sure that the green squares are side by side rather than above and below each other.  Now it is easy to add the remaining patches to complete the layout of the block.  I’ve realised that the main photo of the quilt was taken with the green squares above each other, but that’s just because I must have rotated the quilt before I hung it up for the photo.

Lay a 6.1/2″ lilac rectangle at the beginning of row one.  Place a half square triangle and a 3.1/2″ purple square at the end of the row.  Lay the half square triangle so that the purple is on top with the lilac between it.  Lay a purple square and a half square triangle on either side of the central area.  On the left the square is beneath the half square triangle and together they form a half-house shape.  On the right the square is above the half square triangle and the half-house shape is now upside down.

For the last row place a purple square and half square triangle at the beginning of the row with the remaining lilac rectangle at the end.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  At this stage it measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make five of these.

Alternate block pinwheels

Alternate block pinwheels

Pinwheel alternate block

I have used a simple pinwheel as the alternate block.  Using the 6.7/8″ squares, make half square triangles in exactly the same way as for the smaller squares above.

Lay these out in two pairs so that the colours alternate all the way round – check the photo.  Sew the pairs of squares together and then sew the pairs to each other.  This block also measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make four of these.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the pinwheel snail trail quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Rows one and three are the same as each other:  a snail trail block at each end with a pinwheel in the middle.  Make sure that you keep the green squares side by side across the row.

Row two

Row two

In row two place a pinwheel at each end with a snail trail block in the middle.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

Quilt border

I have used 2.1/2″ green strips for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the pinwheel snail trail quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/9SWleUiri3Q

Jewellery Quarter

Jewellery Quarter

Last week I visited the Jewellery Quarter in Birmingham.  It’s a lovely vibrant area of the city with a wealth of history.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.

I have a very old overlocker which was a basic model even when I bought it many years ago.  This week I have been trying to make scarves and my overlocker has really not been very helpful.  I’ve warned it that I will retire it if it doesn’t behave, but that doesn’t seem to have made any difference.

 

Pinwheel Diamond Quilt – Free Pattern

Pinwheel diamond quilt

Pinwheel diamond quilt

My pinwheel diamond quilt pattern is made with just two simple blocks – and I think it’s really attractive.  The pinwheels are placed in the middle with a circle of gold diamonds around them.

The quilt measures 58″ by 70″, made with twenty 12″ blocks sewn together in five rows of four.  I have used 2 yards of gold fabric with 1.3/4 yards each of purple and lilac.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

But before I begin the pattern I just want to wish you a very happy, healthy and prosperous 2019.  It’s rather exciting having a whole new year ahead of us!




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the pinwheel diamond quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  forty lilac, forty gold

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty each in purple and gold, twenty each in purple and lilac

6.7/8″ squares  twenty lilac, twenty gold

For the borders you will need to cut six 1.1/2″ strips of gold and thirteen 2.1/2″ of purple across the width of fabric.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a purple square with either a lilac or a gold square.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the purple and trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.  These are now 3.1/2″ squares.  You need to make them in purple/gold and in purple/lilac.

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Make the pinwheel block

This block has a very simple four patch layout.  Begin with four purple/lilac half square triangle units in the middle.  Place these so that they form a pinwheel, with the lilac and purple alternating.

Now place a purple/gold half square triangle outside each purple triangle of the central pinwheel.  Lay these so that the outer purple triangle and the inner purple triangle together form a diamond shape, extending the pinwheel.

Place a lilac square in each corner and a gold square in the remaining four spaces.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the pinwheel block.  It measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make ten of them.

Alternate block layout

Alternate block layout

Make the alternate block

Use the 6.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in exactly the same way as you made the smaller ones above.

Lay the half square triangles in fours.  Place them so that the triangles form larger triangles – two gold triangles opposite each other and two lilac triangles opposite each other.

Sew the pieces together in two pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  These also measure 12.1/2″ square and you need to make ten of them.

Rows 1 and 5

Rows 1 and 5

Assemble the quilt

Sew the blocks together in five rows of four.  Rows one and five are the same as each other:  a pinwheel at each end with two alternate blocks between them.  Place the alternate blocks so that the gold triangles form diamonds across the rows while lilac triangles point up and down.

Rows 2,3,4

Rows 2,3,4

Rows two to four are also the same as each other.  This time the two pinwheel blocks are in the middle with an alternate block at each end.

Note that this time the gold triangles run up and down while the lilac triangles run from side to side.

At this stage the quilt top measures 48.1/2″ by 60.1/2″.

First border

First border

Add the borders

I’ve used 2.1/2″ purple strips for the first border.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 64.1/2″ for the sides.

Second and third borders

Second and third borders

In the second border you need to cut 1.1/2″ strips of gold:  two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 66.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally for the third border use 2.1/2″ strips of purple again:  two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 70.1/2″ for the sides.

The pinwheel diamond quilt top is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/blLul-GZh9g

Owl and Pussycat table runner

owl and Pussycat table runner

No travels this week – I just luxuriated in the festive season.  What I can show you, though, is a table runner that I made using the owl and pussycat templates that I used in the quilt of the same name.  To see it click here or click on the photo.

Pinwheel Ring Quilt Pattern

Pinwheel ring quilt

Pinwheel ring quilt

The pinwheel ring quilt is one of many pinwheel quilt patterns that I have written, but for this one I have used two different types of pinwheel and I feel that the lighter block gives a ring shape when surrounded by the other, darker, pinwheel block.  The quilt is made entirely with half square triangles, so I apologise to those of you who don’t like making them.

The quilt blocks are all 12″ square finished size and you need eight of each block.

The quilt measures 54″ square and I have used 1.1/2 yards of red fabric, 1.1/4 yards of blue and 1 yard of white.  As ever you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed pinwheel quilt blocks

Completed pinwheel quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the pinwheel ring quilt

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty two each in red and white, thirty two each in blue and white

6.7/8″ squares:  sixteen red, sixteen blue

For the border you will need six 3.1/2″ strips of red cut across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the first quilt block

Make half square triangles with all the squares.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units.  These will be 3.1/2″ squares in both red and white and in blue and white, and 6.1/2″ squares in red and blue.

First part of the layout

First part of the layout

The pinwheel ring quilt block is made with all the 3.1/2″ squares.  I’m showing you the blue and white squares first for clarity.  There are four half square triangles in the middle forming a basic pinwheel and then one extra blue/white half square triangle placed next to each of the central squares, forming a blue diamond shape.

Pinwheel ring quilt block layout

Pinwheel ring quilt block layout

Now you can add the red/white squares in the empty spaces.  There is one in each corner, placed so that the red is on the outside, forming the corner of the block.  The other red/white squares all form an overall star with the blue triangles:  they are placed so that the white triangles form a larger triangle pointing in towards the middle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.  You need to make eight of these.

Alternate quilt block layout

Alternate quilt block layout

Making the alternate quilt block

The alternate block is a basic pinwheel.  Place four of the large half square triangles together in two pairs.  Make sure that the colours alternate around the middle.

Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.

You will need to make eight of these.

Assembling the pinwheel ring quilt

Rows 1 and 3

Rows 1 and 3

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four, alternating the blocks across the rows and down the columns.

In rows one and three place the pinwheel ring block first, then an alternate block, a ring block and another alternate block.

Rows 2 and 4

Rows 2 and 4

In rows two and four do the opposite:  begin with an alternate block and follow with a ring block.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

For the border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the top of the pinwheel ring quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Vegetable patch quilt

Vegetable patch quilt

I was going to bring you a photo of the views from the Clent Hills today, but the images seem mysteriously to have disappeared – that’s me and technology again!  Instead I’m bringing you a photo of one of the quilts that I’ve been making all week.  It’s a quilt that I designed for Fabric Freedom for a fabric range called Vegetable Patch.  Although I like the design, I’ve made five of this quilt during the week – it’s starting to lose its appeal for me now!

Pinwheel Star Quilt Pattern

Pinwheel star quilt

Pinwheel star quilt

For the pinwheel star quilt pattern I have used three different quilt blocks – all very simple ones.  The quilt is a good lap quilt size (41″ square) and comes together really quickly.  There aren’t even too many half square triangles!  I’ve used 3/4 yard each of red, blue and cream fabrics to make nine quilt blocks which are all 9″ finished size, together with three borders in the same colours.  Together they come together to make a pretty star with pinwheels in the quilt corners.

You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the pinwheel star quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

4.3/8″ squares:  eight blue, eight cream

3.7/8″ squares:  six blue, six cream

3.1/2″ squares:  one blue

1.1/2″ by 7.1/2″ strips:  ten red

1.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips:  ten red

2.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ strips:  two cream

2.1/2″ by 7.1/2″ strips:  two cream

3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips:  four blue, four cream

For the borders you will need to cut four 3.1/2″ cream strips across the width of fabric, four 1.1/2″ blue strips and four 3.1/2″ red strips

Central quilt block layout

Central quilt block layout

Making the central quilt block

Begin with a 3.1/2″ blue square in the middle.  Sew a 3.1/2″ cream strip to top and bottom and a 7.1/2″ cream strip to each side.

Sew a 7.1/2″ red strip to the top and bottom and finally sew a 9.1/2″ red strip to each side.

You only need to make one of this block.

Making the pinwheel quilt block

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangles using the 4.3/8″ squares.  Place a blue and a cream square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 4″ squares.

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Use four half square triangles for each pinwheel.  Place them in two pairs as shown.  Sew the pairs together and then sew the pairs to each other to make a four patch unit.

Sew a 7.1/2″ red strip to the top and bottom of the block and then sew a 9.1/2″ red strip to each side.

You need to make four of these blocks.

Making the stripey quilt block

Stripey quilt block layout

Stripey quilt block layout

Make half square triangle units with the 3.7/8″ squares.  Place three of these side by side with the blue triangles in the top left.

The rest of the block is made using a blue 3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strip at the top, then a cream strip and finally the half square triangles.

Sew the half square triangles together first and then sew the rows to each other.  You need to make four of this block.

Assembling the pinwheel star quilt

Pinwheel star quilt layout

Pinwheel star quilt layout

Lay the blocks out in three rows of three.  The first row is made with a stripey block in the middle and a pinwheel block on either side.  The stripey block is placed with the triangles on the bottom.

The second row is made with the central block in the middle and a stripey block on either side.  These are placed so that the triangles run along the edges of the central block.

The third row is made with a stripey block in the middle and a pinwheel block on either side.  The stripey block is placed so that the triangles are at the top of the block.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

First quilt border

First quilt border

For the first border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of cream fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 27.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the sides.

The second border is made using 1.1/2″ strips of blue.  You’ll need two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 35.1/2″ for the sides.

Final border for the pinwheel star quilt

Final border for the pinwheel star quilt

Finally for the third border I have enclosed the quilt with 3.1/2″ strips of red – two lengths of 35.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 41.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the pinwheel star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Facing Africa - NOMA

Facing Africa – NOMA

Recently I have become aware of a small charity that gives extraordinary help to individual people with a dreadful disease called NOMA.  I am so impressed with what they do that I feel I want to help them as much as I can.  I have set up a Just Giving page for donations and I am going to donate all the proceeds of my quilt sales to them.  You can find out more about them either by clicking on the photo or by clicking on Facing Africa – NOMA.

 

Pinwheel Quilt Pattern

Pinwheel quilt

Pinwheel quilt

The pinwheel quilt pattern has a boring name, but there is a pinwheel in each block and another formed when the blocks are sewn together, so the quilt is pretty much full of pinwheels.  There are also lots of other secondary designs that form the longer you look at it – something I always love seeing.

The quilt measures 64″ square and I have made it with nine 18″ quilt blocks and three borders, using 1/4 yard of yellow fabric, 1/2 yard of pink, 1 yard of green, 1.1/4 yards of white and 2.1/4 yards of red fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed pinwheel quilt block

Completed pinwheel quilt block

Cutting requirements for the pinwheel quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty six red, thirty six green, seventy two white

3.7/8″ squares:  eighteen each in red and white, thirty six each in red and pink, eighteen each in yellow and white, eighteen each in green and white

For the first border you will need 2.1/2″ lengths of red fabric:  two at 54.1/2″ long, two at 58.1/2″ long

For the second border you will need 1.1/2″ lengths of green fabric:  two at 58.1/2″ long, two 60.1/2″ long

For the third border you will need 2.1/2″ lengths of red fabric:  two at 60.1/2″ long, two at 64.1/2″ long

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the pinwheel quilt block

Make half square triangle units using the 3.7/8″ squares in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Central area of the quilt block

Central area of the quilt block

For this pinwheel quilt block the squares are laid out in six rows of six, but I am going to show the central area of the block first so that you can see how the block is built up.  The pinwheel in the middle is created with four green/white half square triangles.  The frame outside this is made with a yellow/white half square triangle in each corner.  These are placed so that the yellow is always on the outside.  Between these corner squares are a green and a white square along each edge.  These are placed so that the green square is placed against the blade of the central pinwheel, with the white square next to it.

Full layout of the pinwheel quilt block

Full layout of the pinwheel quilt block

The final frame of the quilt block is made using a red/white half square triangle in each corner.  These are rotated for each corner:  check the photo to see which direction these half square triangles are placed.

Between the corner squares along each edge are a red square, two red/pink half square triangles and a white square.  The pink triangles are placed so that they form a larger square pointing away from the middle of the block.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

Assembling the pinwheel quilt

Three quilt borders

Three quilt borders

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.

I have used three borders:  the first one is made with 2.1/2″ red strips.  Sew the 54.1/2″ lengths to the top and bottom of the quilt and the 58.1/2″ lengths to the sides.

For the second border use the 1.1/2″ green strips.  Sew the 58.1/2″ lengths to the top and bottom and the 60.1/2″ lengths to the sides.

Finally use 2.1/2″ red strips again for the third border:  sew the 60.1/2″ lengths to the top and bottom and the 64.1/2″ lengths to the sides.

That completes the pinwheel quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Custard factory entrance

Custard factory entrance

Sculpture

Sculpture

There’s an area in Birmingham called the Custard Factory.  As it’s in the creative area of Birmingham and full of students, I had always assumed that it was just a cute name.  But when I went exploring there recently I found that it actually was the original site of the Bird’s Custard factory.

Now the area describes itself  like this:

The Custard Factory is the UK’s leading destination for creative and digital businesses, independent shops and alternative culture outside London.

Fountains in the Custard Factory

Fountains in the Custard Factory

It’s a lovely area and I really enjoyed wandering the streets there.  On that particular day one of the shops was having a ‘Kilo Sale’ of vintage items.  People could fill up bags with vintage clothing, shoes, jewellery and bric a brac, paying a price per kilo.  The queues of people waiting to get in stretched all round the square.  Being British I was terribly tempted to join the queue but decided that I really don’t have the room for any more clutter in my house!

Big Dipper Quilt Pattern

Big dipper quilt

Big dipper quilt

I have made the Big Dipper quilt pattern using 5″ squares so that you could use squares from a charm pack if you chose.  The thing that really delights me about this pattern is that the big dipper quilt block is a simple one forming only one pinwheel.  However when you sew them all together you end up with two different pinwheels.  They look as though they are put together using a diagonal layout (which is a bit more complicated) but in fact they are just sewn together in horizontal rows – the simplest form of quilt layout.

The quilt measures 37″ by just under 54″.  You could very easily make it bigger just by adding extra rows and columns.  I have used six big dipper quilt blocks which are 16.1/2″ finished size.  The fabrics are chosen as two pairings of dark and light colours.  I have used black and white with grey and turquoise.   You need 1/2 yard each of black, white and grey with 1 yard of turquoise because that is also used for the border.




Cutting requirements for the big dipper quilt

5″ squares:  twenty four each in grey, black, turquoise and white

For the border you will need five 2.1/2″ strips of turquoise cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the big dipper quilt block

The quilt is made entirely from half square triangle units.  You will need to make equal numbers of these in all the colour combinations.  That’s  black with both white and turquoise, grey with both white and turquoise.

Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units from each pair of squares that you began with.  Press the seam allowance towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.  These are now 4.5/8″ squares which will give 4.1/8″ squares finished size.  I know these are unusual looking sizes, but it’s because the starting point was 5″ squares – a nice easy measurement to cut out.

Big dipper quilt block layout

Big dipper quilt block layout

Lay the half square triangles out in four rows of four.  Notice that each triangle ends up next to another of the same colour, forming a larger triangle in that colour.  There is a diamond of grey and green in the middle forming one pinwheel, while the black and white triangles are all round the edge of the block.  These will later form the second set of pinwheels when the blocks are sewn together.

One way to check your placement is to see that the black and grey larger triangles all meet each other at the point.  The turquoise and white triangles all meet at the point as well.

Sew the squares across each row

Sew the squares across each row

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the big dipper quilt block.  You will need to make six of these.

Assembling the big dipper quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of two.  As the blocks are totally symmetrical, there is no wrong way to place them – they look the same if they are rotated.

Big dipper quilt border

Big dipper quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of turquoise fabric.  You will need two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 54″ for the sides.

That completes the big dipper quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

I have had a couple of viewings on my house this week, so I’m keeping my fingers crossed that I may get an offer.  I keep forgetting where I put things when I tidied them up, so it seems to take me ages to find anything.