Peace Garden Quilt

Peace garden quilt

Peace garden quilt

Peace Garden is one of Fabric Freedom’s newest ranges and they are lovely muted blues and greens.  This is their quilt to showcase the range and it is a beautiful quilt.  I wouldn’t describe it as a beginner quilt although each part of the quilt can be broken down into small and manageable steps.

The quilt measures 67″ square and is made by sewing the blocks together across the diagonal.  I have used 1.1/4 yards of floral fabric, 1.3/4 yards of light blue, 1 yard of medium blue, 1/2 yard of dark blue, 1.1/4 yards of green with just 1/2 yard of white fabric.  The white fabric is only used in that lovely border where it appears to run behind the blocks.




Light block for the peace garden quilt

Light block for the peace garden quilt

Cutting requirements

Light blocks:  twenty five 8.1/2″ floral squares, one hundred 2.1/2″ light blue squares

Dark blocks:  thirty six 4.1/2″ dark blue squares, seventy two 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ light blue rectangles, seventy two 2.1/2″ green squares, seventy two 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ green rectangles

Infill triangles:  seven medium blue 3.1/4″ strips, seven 2″ white strips, four 2″ green strips, three 2″ light blue strips – all cut across the width of fabric

Corner triangles:  one 9.1/4″ medium blue square

Mark the diagonal of the blue squares

Mark the diagonal of the blue squares

Trim the corners

Trim the corners

Make the light block for the peace garden quilt

Mark a line along the diagonal of the light blue squares.  With right sides together, place on in each corner of a floral square with the marked line across the corner.  Sew along the line.

 

Flip the triangles to complete the square

Flip the triangles to complete the square

Trim the two layers of fabric outside the seam line.  Flip the light blue triangle out so that it completes the square, giving the floral square light blue corners.

There – that was definitely an easy block.  You will need twenty five of these.

 

Strip piecing for the dark block

Strip piecing for the dark block

Make the dark block

The dark block is not much more difficult.  You can speed it up using strip piecing.  Sew together a 6.1/2″ strip of light blue fabric with a 2.1/2″ strip of green fabric.

Cut this panel at 2.1/2″ intervals.  This gives you strips of fabric 8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ long with a green square at the end of a blue strip.  Do this with five strips each of blue and green – you need seventy two blue/green strips.

 

Layout for the dark quilt block

Layout for the dark quilt block

Lay the patchwork out as shown.  Place a blue/green strip at the top with the green on the right and on the bottom with the green on the left.  Across the middle place a 4.1/2″ dark blue (doves) square with a green 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangle on either side.

Sew the three patches together across the middle row and then sew the three rows to each other.  You need to make thirty six of these blocks.

Green infill triangle

Green infill triangle

Make the infill triangles

There is a triangle at each end of each row and these are made with three fabrics.  It is these triangles which give that lovely white section in the border which appears to run behind the blocks of the quilt.

You will need twelve of these with green fabric at the tip of the triangle and eight with light blue at the tip.  They are made in the same way as each other.

Sew together three strips of fabric

Sew together three strips of fabric

Line up one of the inch lines with the cut edge

Line up one of the inch lines with the cut edge

Sew together a 3.1/4″ strip of medium blue with a 2″ white strip and a 2″ strip of either green or light blue.  Line up your ruler so that the 45 degree line runs along the bottom of the fabric.  Make a cut along that diagonal line.

Now line up one of the measuring lines of your ruler with the cut edge of the fabric, making sure that the ruler edge is at the top of the cut edge.  Make a cut along that diagonal from top right to bottom left.  This produces your first triangle.  Continue across the panel of fabric.  This is a fairly wasteful stage, because you can only get three triangles from each panel of fabric, but it is worth it for the lovely effect that it gives in the quilt border.  It would be possible to use the wasted triangles (those at the top of the panel which have a green base) to make a panel for a cushion or a tote bag.

Corner triangles

You may prefer to use a template if you have one for these triangles.  I have shown you the way to cut the triangles using only your ruler because I always prefer to show you the way that you can make my quilts without having to buy specialist equipment.

Make the corner triangles

Make the corner triangles

To make all the infill triangles you will need to sew four panels with a green strip and three panels with a blue strip.

The only remaining block to cut is one 9.1/4″ square of the medium blue fabric.  Cut this along both diagonals to give four triangles which will form the corners of the peace garden quilt.

Top left corner of the quilt

Top left corner of the quilt

Assemble the peace garden quilt

Now you need to put all these blocks back together again!

This quilt is diagonally set, so the first block will be the top left corner of the quilt.  Place a corner triangle down first.  Underneath it place a dark block with the green across the top and bottom of the block.  Place an infill triangle with a green tip either side of the block.  The green tips are at the bottom next to the quilt block.  Sew the block and two triangles together and then sew the corner triangle above the block.

Row two

Row two of the peace garden quilt

Row two of the peace garden quilt

The next row has three blocks – two dark and one light – and two blue infill triangles.  The light block is in the middle with a dark block on either side and a triangle at each end.  These are again placed so that the blue tip is at the bottom next the quilt block.  The two dark blocks are placed with the blue on the top and bottom this time.  Sew the blocks together across the row and then sew the row to the corner unit.

The triangles begin to form the edges of the quilt

The triangles begin to form the edges of the quilt

 

You’ll see that the second row is obviously longer than the corner unit.  Line up the two triangles of the corner unit with the tops of the two dark blocks of row two.  The triangles of row two appear to stick out on their own, but if you look at them from the side you will see that the triangle bases are forming a straight line which will be the edge of the quilt.

 

The rows are forming a large triangle

The rows are forming a large triangle

From now on the rows of the quilt increase by two blocks each time, so row three will have five blocks with two triangles, row four will have seven blocks plus triangles, row five will have nine blocks with two triangles.  In each case the rows begin and end with a dark block and alternate dark and light across the row.

Alternate rows have green infill triangles with the dark blocks placed so that the green is on top of the block.  The other rows have blue infill triangles and the dark blocks are placed so that the blue is on the top and bottom of the block.

Corner triangles on the sixth row

Corner triangles on the sixth row

Assemble the second half of the quilt

Row six marks the diagonal of the peace garden quilt and it is the half way point.  The row is made with eleven blocks and a corner triangle, rather than an infill triangle, at each end.  For this row the dark blocks are placed so that the blue is on top, which should be following the pattern of the alternate rows.

 

Row seven of the quilt

Row seven of the quilt

From the next row, the rows get smaller as we move towards the bottom right corner of the quilt.  Row seven has only nine blocks with two infill triangles.  The important thing to note is that the infill triangles are placed in a different way – the green tip is at the top now rather than at the bottom as it was before the half way row.

Continue with the rows now reducing in size by two blocks each time, but continue the pattern of alternating blue and green.  Row eight will have seven blocks, row nine will have five.

The bottom right corner unit

The bottom right corner unit

Finally you will need to make another corner unit the same as the beginning of the quilt: one row with three blocks and two infill triangles, one row with one block only and two infill triangles, and finally the last of the corner triangles.

That completes the peace garden quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found towards the bottom of the beginner quilting section.

If you found the layout a little confusing, you may find that the video helps: