Maine Woods Quilt Pattern

Maine Woods quilt

Maine Woods quilt

The Maine Woods quilt pattern is a very straightforward design using the delightful Maine Woods quilt block.  I have used nine 15″ blocks to make a quilt 51″ square.  At the bottom of the page I have also shown it in Christmas colours in case you wanted to make a Christmas quilt.

Please don’t feel that this looks too complex for you – the quarter square triangles are easy to make if you look at one stage at a time.

I have used 1.1/4 yards each of light blue and red, together with 1 yard of dark blue.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the Maine Woods quilt

Completed Maine Woods quilt block

Completed Maine Woods quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty six light blue, forty five dark blue

3.7/8″ squares:  eighteen each in dark blue and light blue, thirty six each in red and light blue

4.1/4″ squares:  eighteen dark blue, eighteen light blue

For the border you will need to cut six 3.1/2″ red strips across the width of fabric

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares for this.  Place a light blue square with either a dark blue or a red square, right sides together.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the darker colour and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.  Put these to one side so that they don’t get mixed up with the quarter square triangles.

Make the quarter square triangle units

Make the quarter square triangle units

Making the quarter square triangle units

First you need to make half square triangles as above using the 4.1/4″ squares.  Place two of these half square triangles right sides together.  Make sure that the two seams are both running in the same direction and the light blue of one square rests against the dark blue of the other square – as shown in the bottom left part of the photo.

Mark a line along the diagonal that crosses the original seam lines of the half square triangles and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two quarter square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Maine Woods quilt block layout

Maine Woods quilt block layout

Make the Maine Woods quilt block

Lay the squares out in five rows of five.  There’s a dark blue square in the middle with a dark blue square on each corner of the central square.  The quarter square triangles are placed on the edges of the central square.  You can see that the dark blue egg timer shape is vertical above and below the central square, but horizontal on either side.

There’s a light blue square in the middle of each edge of the block and a dark blue/light blue half square triangle in each corner of the block.  Place these so that the light blue is always on the outside, forming the corner of the block.

Place two red/light blue half square triangles on either side of the corner squares.  These are placed so that the red triangle points towards the middle with the light blue triangles edging the corner squares.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows together to complete the block.  Make nine of these.

Three rows of three blocks

Three rows of three blocks

Assembling the Maine Woods quilt

Lay the blocks out in three rows of three.  The blocks are completely symmetric so you don’t need to worry about rotations – they look the same whichever way you look at them.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the sides.

Maine woods quilt in Christmas colours

Maine woods quilt in Christmas colours

That completes the Maine Woods quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  You’ll find full details of these steps in the quilting for beginners section.

For your interest, this is how the quilt would look if you wanted to make it again in Christmas colours.

Here’s the video:

One of the three spires of Coventry City

One of the three spires of Coventry City

Recently I went to Coventry to meet a friend – in case you live outside the UK, Coventry’s a city not far from Birmingham.  I had always known that Oxford was described as the ‘city of dreaming spires’, but I had not been aware that Coventry used to be referred to as the ‘city of three spires’.

This spire was all of this building that survived the war – the rest was destroyed – but it has been kept intact and now houses what looked like a bar or a cafe.

Ruins of Coventry cathedral

Ruins of Coventry cathedral

The ruins of Coventry Cathedral have been kept and maintained while the new Cathedral has been built beside it – on the far side from where I was standing when I took this photo.

Seeing the new and old cathedrals side by side was an amazing sight – one just a skeleton and the other with a very modern design.

This is definitely a city that I’ll be visiting again – there is so much more to it than just Lady Godiva.