Log Cabin Stained Glass Quilt Pattern

Log cabin stained glass quilt

Log cabin stained glass quilt

For my log cabin stained glass quilt pattern I have combined two of my favourite quilt techniques.  The quilt measures 36″ square, using nine blocks which are 10.1/2″ square finished size.  A square in square block forms the central block with some stained glass around the central diamond.  In the log cabin blocks I have used stained glass around each block but not within the blocks.  The colours run from lightest in the middle to darkest at the edges of the block.

I have used 1/8 yard each of white and light blue, 1/4 yard each of yellow, medium and dark blue, 1/2 yard each of cream and black, with 3/4 yard of red fabric.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the log cabin stained glass quilt

All the strips are 2″ wide cut size, so for the log cabins I will just specify the lengths of the strips here:

2″:  eight red, eight light blue

3.1/2″:  eight light blue, eight white

5″:  eight white, eight medium blue

6.1/2″:  eight medium blue, eight yellow

8″:  eight yellow, eight dark blue

9.1/2″:  eight dark blue, eight cream (this is the darkest of the light fabrics)

11″:  eight cream

For the central square cut one 7.7/8″ square in cream and two 6.1/8″ red squares.

Cut 1.1/4″ strips of black across the width -for the stained glass sashing – you will need about nine strips.

For the border cut four 2.1/2″ red strips across the width of fabric.

First half of first frame

First half of first frame

Make the log cabin blocks

Begin with a 2″ red square.  Beneath it place a 2″ light blue square and on the right place a 3.1/2″ light blue strip.Sew the two squares together first and then add the light blue strip on the right.

Complete the first frame

Complete the first frame

Make the second half of the first frame with white strips.  Sew a 3.1/2″ white strip across the top with a 5″ strip down the left hand side.  Apologies if the white strips don’t show up too well in the photo.

Second frame

Second frame

Begin the second frame of logs with medium blue strips – a 5″ strip across the bottom and a 6.1/2″ strip on the right.  Follow these with a 6.1/2″ yellow strip across the top and an 8″ strip down the left hand side.

Third frame

Third frame

There are just three frames to these log cabin blocks.  Begin the third frame with an 8″ dark blue strip across the bottom, followed by a 9.1/2″ dark blue strip up the right hand side.  The final strips look brown in the photo although they are more cream in fact.  Sew a 9.1/2″ strip to the top and finish with an 11″ cream strip down the left hand side.

Trim the blocks if necessary.  They should now measure 11″ square and you need to make eight of them.

Central square layout

Central square layout

Make the central block

Place the 7.7/8″ cream square in the middle.  Cut the 6.1/8″ red squares along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square.  Place one triangle on each side of the square.  You now need to make sashing strips so that you can add sashing around the square before you sew the triangles to the square.

Sashing strips

Sashing strips

Cut four 1.1/4″ strips of black fabric 11″ long.  Fold them in half along the length and press to create a fold mark down the middle of the strip.  Open each strip up and line up the edge of the strip with the edge of the square.  Sew the strip to the square along the fold.  Now press the black strip across the sewing line so that it looks as it did when you first pressed it, but it is know sewn to the square.  Repeat with one strip on each edge of the square.

Sew the triangles on

Sew the triangles on

Next sew two of the red triangles to opposite edges of the square.  Press them open and then sew the remaining two triangles in place.

Trim the edges

Trim the edges

Trim the middle of the edges where the triangle tips stick out.

This block measures 11″ square and you just need to make the one.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the log cabin stained glass quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  In row one place three log cabin blocks.  Rotate them so that the blue triangle section of each block is placed top right, top left and then bottom right.

Seam partially sewn

Seam partially sewn

Cut two 11″ strips of black fabric for the sashing.  Prepare them as above, folding in half along the length to create a fold line to sew along.

Sew one sashing strip to the right hand edge of the first block.  Then sew the second block to the first block along the sashed edge.  Sew a sashing strip to the right hand side of the second block and sew the third block to the second block.

Rows two and three

Rows two and three

For row two place a log cabin block at each end with the central block in the middle.  Add two sashing strips between the blocks.  The blue triangles of the log cabins should be bottom left and then top right.

Make row three with three log cabin quilt blocks.  Place the blue triangles top left, bottom right and then bottom left.  My aim was to place the log cabins in pairs forming a sort of mountain shape pointing from the edge of the quilt towards the middle.  You’ll see one of these mountains on each edge of the quilt.

Sashing across the rows

Keep your eye on the needle

Keep your eye on the needle

When you are sewing the sashing on,  try to keep your eye on the needle to check that it’s coming down in the fold of the fabric each time.

Sew the blocks together across each row.  Trim the top and the bottom of each row to a straight line.  Your lines are probably already straight, but I find that I have to trim mine.  With a sashing this small it would be difficult to sew it to the row if there were ups and downs in the edges of the rows.  Your sewing is probably far more accurate than mine is!

Add sashing between the rows

Add sashing between the rows

Add the sashing between rows

Cut four 1.1/4″ strips of black fabric.  Fold and press them as before.  Sew one to the top of the first row, one each between the rows and one to bottom of the third row.  The actual length required is about 33.1/2″, but I tend to use a complete length and then trim it.

Now cut two further strips of black fabric, fold and press as before, and sew one to each side of the quilt.

You will no doubt notice that my vertical sashing is not always a straight line.  This would be for either of both these reasons:  either my seam allowances were not accurate or I didn’t trim the blocks to size accurately enough before joining them.  Just thought that I’d mention that so that you can avoid my mistakes.

Add the border

Add the border

Log cabin stained glass quilt border

In order to frame the quilt I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 32.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the log cabin stained glass quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/Aun8OLGtPeo

Borough market and Southwark Cathedral

Borough market and Southwark Cathedral

Recently I spent some time in London.  I was lucky enough to have time to visit Southwark Cathedral – what a treat that was!  It’s right beside Borough Market, not far from London Bridge.  To see my photos click here or click on the image.

I have a stall at Moseley Arts Market tomorrow.  I’m hoping that the weather will be as warm as it has been so far this week.

Wonky Log Cabin Quilt Pattern

Wonky log cabin quilt

Wonky log cabin quilt

I have made this wonky log cabin quilt in its most simple form.  My main aim was to show you that you don’t have to use foundation piecing.  This simple rectangular quilt can be made with normal piecing – and it’s great fun.  I used it as a scrappy quilt and it ended up being a memory quilt as well.  As I rummaged through my stash I came across some lovely fabrics that I had forgotten about.

The quilt measures about 57″ by 74″, requiring twelve blocks which are 17″ square finished size.  I used about 2.1/2 yards of the grey background fabric together with about 8 red strips (3/4 yard), 14 blue strips (1 yard) and a further 3.1/2″ strip of red for the central squares and 3/4 yard of a dark fabric for the border.  The strips are all 2.1/2″ wide, so that you can used jelly roll leftover strips if you wish.




Wonky log cabin quilt block

Wonky log cabin quilt block

Cutting requirements for the wonky log cabin quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  twelve red

2.1/2″ strips:  approximately 35 grey, 8 red and 14 blue

For the border you will need to cut seven 3.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric.

Make the first round

Begin with a red square

Begin with a red square

Log cabin blocks traditionally have a red square in the middle to represent the fire in the hearth of the log cabin.  I have used a red metallic fabric for this.  Sew a 3.1/2″ grey strip to the bottom of the square and a 5.1/2″ strip to the left hand side.

Cut a triangle off

Cut a triangle off

Place your ruler so that it runs from the bottom right hand corner of this section to a point 2″ up from the bottom left hand corner.  Cut this triangle shape off.

Add the remaining logs

Add the remaining logs

Now add a 5.1/2″ grey strip across the top and a 7.1/2″ strip down the right hand side of the red square.

The progression in the photo runs down the left hand side and then down the right hand side of the photo.  Cut a triangle from the left hand side, top and then right hand sides of the section.  In each case the triangle runs from one corner to a point 2″ from the next corner.  This completed section measures about 5.1/2″ or 6″ square.

Add the red strips

Add the red strips

Make the second round of logs

For the next round I have used red strips.  They are from stash so each side is different.  Begin with a strip across the bottom and then add strips in a clockwise direction around the section.

Speed piecing log cabin blocks

Speed piecing log cabin blocks

Speed piecing log cabin blocks

I am using speed piecing for the rest of the block so I am not specifying lengths here.  This involves taking one strip of red fabric and sewing several blocks to it.  Place the red strip with right side up and then place a block with right side down against the red strip.  When you reach the bottom of the block, place another block to butt up against the first block and continue sewing.  At the end of the strip repeat with another red strip until you have added another red strip to every block.  Separate the blocks by cutting across the strip between each block.  This means that you don’t have to measure and cut each strip so it saves a huge amount of time.

Trim the red strips

Trim the red strips

Continue until you have added red strips to all four sides of the section.  Trim a triangle from each edge.  In this case place your ruler to run from one corner to a point only 1″ from the following corner.  This section measures about 9″ or 9.1/2″ square.

One of the reasons that I have varied the size of the triangles is because I wanted the coloured frames to stand out well so that you can see how the block has built up clearly.  So I have taken 2″ triangles from the grey frames and 1″ triangles from the coloured frames.

Third round of logs

Third round of logs

Complete the wonky log cabin quilt blocks

For the next round of logs use 2.1/2″ grey strips.  Cut 2″ triangles from this round.  This section measures about 11″ square.

Add the blue strips

Add the blue strips

I have used blue strips for the fourth round of logs, cutting 1″ triangles from each edge.  At this stage the block measures about 13.1/2″ to 14″ square.

Add the grey strips

Add the grey strips

Make the final round of logs with grey strips.  Don’t cut any triangles from this round of logs.

As I was cutting triangles from the previous frames I wasn’t worrying too much about accuracy.  The final reckoning comes now with the final grey frame.  The edges of all my blocks varied between 17.1/2″ and 18″ long.  At this stage I trimmed all the blocks to 17.1/2″ square.  What size you use for your blocks doesn’t matter.  The important point is that all blocks need to be the same size as each other so that you can sew them together.

Sew the blocks in rows of three

Sew the blocks in rows of three

Assemble the wonky log cabin quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of three blocks.  Sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of a dark fabric to frame the quilt.  You’ll need two lengths of approximately 51.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of approximately 74.1/2″ for the sides.  Do measure your quilt edges as they may vary slightly from mine.

That completes the wonky log cabin quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Snow in my garden

Snow in my garden

I can’t bring you any travel photos this week as I have hardly left the house all week.  We haven’t had nearly as much snow as most parts of the UK, but I still didn’t feel it was worth risking slipping on icy pavements when I didn’t really have any urgent reason to leave the house.

I hope that wherever you live you are safe and warm.