Renaissance Attic Windows Quilt

Renaissance attic windows quilt

Renaissance attic windows quilt

I’ve made an attic windows quilt using a lovely new fabric range called Renaissance which has some lovely rich looking fabrics.  I’ve adapted the attic windows block slightly so that I can rotate the blocks to give secondary designs when I sew the blocks together.  The quilt measures 54″ square.  I have used 1/2 yard of the light fabric for the border and cornerstones, with 3/4 yard of each of the remaining four fabrics.  The main square within each block is a floral design – something that you want to showcase – while the first frame around this square is half light and half dark (red and pink in this quilt).  The sashing is a colour (dark) from within the central square and the cornerstones and border are a light colour.




Cutting requirements for the renaissance attic windows quilt

Floral fabric:  sixteen 6.1/2″ squares

Red script fabric:  sixteen 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles, sixteen 8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles, sixteen 2.7/8″ squares

Pink script fabric:  sixteen 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles, sixteen 8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles, sixteen 2.7/8″ squares

Green sashing fabric:  forty 2.1/2″ by 10.1/2″ rectangles

Light border fabric:  twenty five 2.1/2″ squares for the cornerstones, two lengths 2.1/2″ by 50.1/2″ and two lengths 2.1/2″ by 54.1/2″ for the attic windows quilt border

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the attic windows quilt block

Make half square triangles with the 2.7/8″ squares.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowance towards the dark fabric and trim the corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Attic windows quilt block layout

Attic windows quilt block layout

Lay the attic windows quilt block with the floral square in the middle and a frame of pink and red.  The 6.1/2″ rectangles are across the top and bottom of the central square with the 8.1/2″ rectangles down the sides.  The half square triangles are placed in the two diagonally opposite corners.

You’ll notice that in the top right hand corner the script in the half square triangle continues the direction of the script in the rectangles either side of it.  In the bottom left hand half square triangle, the direction of the script doesn’t match that on either side of it.  This is mainly because my brain was broadly absent after all the travelling I did this week.  What I should have done is used one diagonal for half of the squares when I made the half square triangles and then used the other diagonal for the remaining squares.

Make three columns of patchwork

Make three columns of patchwork

Completed attic windows quilt block

Completed attic windows quilt block

Sew the patchwork pieces together to make three columns, then sew the three columns together to complete the attic windows quilt block.

You will need to make sixteen of these blocks.  They will be sewn together in four rows of four, but with sashing between each block and between each row of blocks.

Sew a sashing strip between the blocks

Sew a sashing strip between the blocks

Sewing the attic windows quilt blocks together

Place the first block of row one so that the red triangles is bottom right of the block. Place the second block so that the red triangle is bottom left and sew a green sashing strip between them.  Repeat this pairing for the second half of the row.  You should have four blocks with three sashing strips so that there is no sashing at each end of the row.  This placement is the same for rows one and three.

For rows two and four you will need to place the red triangles so that they form a larger red triangle pointing downwards – so the red will be top right and then top left.

Add sashing between the rows

Add sashing between the rows

Add sashing between the rows

In order to sew the rows to each other, make up five strips of sashing – four green sashing strips and three light cornerstones in each strip.

Sew one strip above and below row one.  Sew row two to the sashing below row one and then keep adding the rows with sashing.  You will end up with sashing above and below the rows and between each row.

Add sashing strips to the sides

Add sashing strips to the sides

For the sides of the quilt top, make up two strips with five cornerstones and four green sashing strips.  Sew one of these to each side of the attic windows quilt top.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

I decided that the quilt didn’t look finished at this stage, so I added a 2.1/2″ border strip made from the same fabric as the cornerstones.  You’ll need two lengths of 50.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the renaissance attic windows quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

You might also be interested in an attic windows quilt made showing the view outside the window.

Here’s the video:

Elephant ride

Elephant ride

Many of you have been kind enough to ask about my trip to Zimbabwe and South Africa last week.  You can see some of the photos (I took about 500 altogether!) by clicking here.

Grandmother Percys Puzzle Quilt

Grandmother Percys Puzzle quilt

Grandmother Percys Puzzle quilt

The Grandmother Percy’s puzzle quilt is made using one of those delightful old fashioned quilt blocks made with just squares and half square triangles.  There is only one quilt block pattern used, although the design shows up as two distinct blocks when several of them are sewn together.  I have used red for the dark colour, grey for the medium and a floral white for the light fabric.

The quilt measures 79″ square because I have used twenty five quilt blocks, but you could make it smaller if you want to – if you used sixteen blocks in four rows of four that would give you a 64″ square quilt, or if you used nine blocks in three rows of three that would give you a 49″ square quilt.  For this size quilt, I have used 2 yards of red, 1.1/2 yards of grey and 3 yards of white.  The original block has the colours placed differently and you can see it here.




Cutting requirements for the Grandmother Percys Puzzle quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  one hundred red, one hundred grey, two hundred and twenty five white

3.7/8″ squares:  fifty red, fifty grey, one hundred white

For the border you will need eight 2.1/2″ strips of red cut across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the Greandmother Percys Puzzle quilt block

Make half square triangles with the 3.7/8″ squares.  Place a white square with a red or grey square, right sides together.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are both 3.1/2″ squares.

Grandmother Percys puzzle quilt block layout

Grandmother Percys puzzle quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in five rows of five.  There are two red squares in two diagonally opposite corners with a red square diagonally in from these corners.  The other two corners have the same but in grey.

There are two white squares along each edge and one in the middle.  For the half square triangles, it’s best just to check the photo to be sure that you have them placed correctly.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.  Make twenty five blocks.

Assembling the Grandmother Percys puzzle quilt

Sew the blocks together in five rows of five, rotating every second block across each row and down each column.  If you look at the photo and concentrate on the two red triangles in each block you’ll see that they go from top left to bottom right in the first block and then from bottom left to top right in the block next to it.

Quilt border

Quilt border

Quilt border

Make two lengths of 75.1/2″ in the 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  Sew these to the top and bottom of the quilt.  Make two lengths of 79.1/2″ and sew these to the sides.

That completes the Grandmother Percys puzzle quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding. Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Many of you have asked about my longarm quilting efforts, so here’s an update of what we’ve been up to:  click on longarm quilting progress.

 

 

Craftsy

 

Propeller Quilt Pattern

Propeller quilt

Propeller quilt

The propeller quilt block is a simple enough one and I have just added a bit more for the eye to follow by changing the colours in a few of the blocks to create an inner red diamond.

The quilt measures 46″ square and I have used a yard each of the black and white fabrics with 3/4 yard of red.  The black requirement is exactly 36″, so you might be safer to buy a bit more than a yard to be safe.  There are thirteen quilt blocks and they are laid out in a diagonal setting.




Cutting requirements for the propeller quilt

4.7/8″ squares:  twenty six each in black and white

2.1/2″ squares:  sixty five white, thirty six black and sixteen red – don’t cut these yet as they can be strip pieced

7.7/8″ squares: two red cut along one diagonal for the corner triangles

10.7/8″ squares:  four red cut along one diagonal for the infill triangles

For the border you will need four 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the half square triangles

Use the 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a white square with a black square and mark a line along one diagonal.  Sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units for each pair of squares.

Press the seam allowance towards the black and trim the corners of the squares.  These should now be 4.1/2″ squares.

Strip piecing the small squares

Strip piecing the small squares

Strip piecing the small squares

Some time can be saved by strip piecing the 2.1/2″ squares.  Sew together lengths of white with either black or red.  Press the seam allowance towards the dark fabric and cut at 2.1/2″ intervals to make strips which are 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ of white and either black or red.

For the entire quilt you will need to do this with one strip of white/red and three strips of black/white.

Making the propeller quilt blocks

Propeller quilt block layout

Propeller quilt block layout

You need three slightly different versions of the same propeller block within the quilt.  Make five of the first one, which is entirely black and white.  Lay the squares out as shown in three rows.  Place a half square triangle in each corner, a white square in the middle and a black and a white square together in each of the remaining spaces.  The black squares are placed around the central square with the white squares on the outside.  Note that all the half square triangles are placed facing in different directions from each other.

Sew the patches together across each row.  Finally sew the rows to each other to complete the propeller quilt block.

Second and third versions of the block

Second version of the propeller quilt block

Second version of the propeller quilt block

The second and third versions of the quilt block both have two of the black squares replaced by red ones.

For the second version, replace the two black squares to the right and below the central square with red squares.

Sew the squares together across the rows as for the first version and then sew the rows to each other.

You will need four of this version of the block.

Third version of the propeller quilt block

Third version of the propeller quilt block

Three completed versions of the propeller quilt block

Three completed versions of the propeller quilt block

For the third version, replace two of the black squares with red squares again, but this time replace the ones to the right and left of the central square, so that they are in line along the central row of the block.

Sew the squares and rows together as before.  You will need to make four of this version of the propeller quilt block.

On the right you can see all three versions of the propeller quilt block completed.

First row of the propeller quilt

First row of the propeller quilt

Assembling the propeller quilt

As this quilt is set on the diagonal, the layout begins in the top left corner of the quilt with a corner triangle – that’s one half of a 7.7/8″ red square.  Beneath this place a black and white propeller quilt block with an infill triangle on each side of it – that’s one half of the 10.7/8″ squares.  Sew the quilt block and two triangles together and then add the corner triangle above the quilt block.

Second row of the propeller quilt

Second row of the propeller quilt

The second row is made with three quilt blocks and two infill triangles.  This time the central quilt block is the third version, with a second version of the block on either side and then the infill triangles outside these.  Check the photo to see which way the red squares should be placed.  Just rotate the block until your red squares match up with the photo.

Third row of the propeller quilt

Third row of the propeller quilt

The third row is the middle row of the quilt and it is made using five quilt blocks and two corner triangles.  I couldn’t fit the entire row in a photo, but the first, third and fifth quilt blocks are the plain black and white blocks while the second and fourth blocks are the third version, placed so that the red squares are in a downward line.  You can see that they are continuing the red line begun in the second row above them.  Note that the corner triangles are sewn on to the blocks by the longest edge of the triangle.

Fourth row to the end

The fourth row of the propeller quilt

The fourth row of the propeller quilt

The fourth row contains three quilt blocks and two infill triangles.  The quilt blocks are the third version in the middle of the row with a second version on either side of it.  See how the blocks are rotated so that the red squares now complete the outline of a square.

This photo is probably the best one to  show which way the infill triangles should be placed.  In the first and second rows, the infill triangles are placed so that the longest edge of the triangle is on the outside (forming the edge of the quilt) and the right angled corners (the square corners) are sewn to the bottom of the quilt block.  After the central row, in rows four and five, the infill triangles are still placed so that the longest edge is on the outside, but this time the square corner is sewn to the top of the quilt block.

Fifth row of the propeller quilt

Fifth row of the propeller quilt

Finally the last row is another corner unit the same as the first row – one plain black and white propeller quilt block with an infill triangle on either side and a corner triangle beneath it.  Sew all the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Propeller quilt border

Propeller quilt border

As all the outside edges of this quilt are cut on the bias (the diagonal cut across the squares) they are liable to stretch so it’s a good idea to get the border on as quickly as possible to stabilise the edge.  I have used 2.1/2″ strips of black fabric for this.  You will need two lengths of 42.1/2″ for the first two edges and two lengths of 46.1/2″ for the remaining two edges, but do check your own measurements before you cut these lengths.

The propeller quilt top is now complete and ready for layering, quilting and binding.  You can find full details of these steps in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

 

Square and Half Quilt

Square and a half quilt

Square and a half quilt

The square and a half quilt (I know it’s not a very imaginative name!) is made using one quilt block only but it has the look of a quilt carefully designed with two very different blocks.  I just love it when that happens.  I’ve used nine square and a half quilt blocks to make this 55″ square quilt, using 3/4 yard of green, 1 yard each of dark blue and white, with 1.1/4 yards of light blue.

Cutting requirements for the square and a half quilt

3.7/8″ squares:  fifty four each in dark blue and white

3.1/2″ squares:  nine green, thirty six white, thirty six light blue

4.1/4″ squares:  eighteen green, nine light blue, nine dark blue




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a white square and a dark blue square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangles which are 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowance towards the dark fabric and trim the corners of the square.  Put these to one side now so that they don’t get confused with the quarter square triangles made in the next step.

Make quarter square triangles

Make quarter square triangles

Completed quarter square triangle units

Completed quarter square triangle units

Making the quarter square triangle units

Use the 4.1/4″ squares to make half square triangles as above, using one green square with either a light blue or a dark blue square.

Place one green/light blue half square triangle right sides together with a green/dark blue half square triangle.  Make sure that the green on one square is placed against the blue in the other square.  Mark a line along the other diagonal – so that it crosses the seam.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This produces two quarter square triangles which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Each one has two green quarters opposite each other and a light blue and a dark blue quarter opposite each other.

Inner part of the square and a half quilt block

Inner part of the square and a half quilt block

Making the square and a half quilt block

I think it will be easier to see the layout of the block if I show you the middle first.  This is nine patches with a green square in the middle, a light blue square in each corner and a quarter square triangle unit against each edge of the central square.  Note that these are placed so that the dark blue triangle is always along the edge of the green square.

Square and a half quilt block layout

Square and a half quilt block layout

Now it’s a simple matter to add the outer layer of the quilt block.  There’s a white square in the middle of each edge and dark blue/white half square triangles everywhere else.  These are placed so that the dark blue triangles seem to cut across the corner of the block.  In each corner there are three half square triangles and these are placed so that the triangles are facing the same way as each other in each corner.

Sew the squares together across each of the five rows and then sew the rows to each other.  You will need nine of these quilt blocks.

Assembling the square and a half quilt

This is a terribly easy quilt layout – just sew the quilt blocks together in three rows of three.

First two quilt borders

First two quilt borders

Quilt border

I have used three borders to frame this quilt.  The first border is made using 2.1/2″ strips of light blue fabric.  You will need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

For the second border I have used 1.1/2″ strips of the green fabric.  Make two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the sides.

Third quilt border

Third quilt border

Finally, for the third border I have returned to the 2.1/2″ strips of light blue fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 55.1/2″ for the sides.

The square and a half quilt top is now complete and ready for layering, quilting and binding.  More details on these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

 

Here’s the video:

http://youtu.be/EW_NFuoYsaQ

Thanks so much for all your wonderful suggestions for a name for my longarm machine.  It was a real treat to read them and I really appreciate so many of you taking the time to write in with ideas.  I found it extremely difficult to choose, but I have decided to go with Minnie as my name for her.  It works on several levels – trips off the tongue whether I am pleased or annoyed with her, she is definitely not ‘mini’, and it’s a shortening of minion.  I’m still working on the last bit – she is most definitely the boss at the moment.  I have been trying to work with her a little each day and I definitely feel better about her now than I did a week ago.  My movements still seem a little jerky – but I can hardly blame that on her!

Barn Dance Quilt

Barn dance quilt

Barn dance quilt

I was going to call this quilt pattern Square Dance but then I realised that I already have a quilt called that, so it is now officially the barn dance quilt – even though the quilt blocks are floral!  I just felt that the blocks reminded me of people whirling around in a dance.  The quilt measures 54″ square and I have used 1.1/2 yards of cream fabric, 3/4 yard each of yellow and pink fabric and 1/2 yard each of blue and green fabric.  Given the colours that I have used, I think I can see this as a beach or picnic quilt.




Quilt block one

Quilt block one

Cutting requirements for quilt block one

2.7/8″ squares:  thirty two each in yellow and cream

4.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in cream and pink

2.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty two cream

Quilt block two

Quilt block two

Cutting requirements for quilt block two

4.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in yellow and cream, eight each in pink and green

4.1/2″ squares:  eight cream, eight pink

2.1/2″ squares:  sixteen green

2.7/8″ squares:  eight each in green and cream

You will also need five 3.1/2″ strips of blue fabric for the border

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

For both blocks, make half square triangles with all the 2.7/8″ and 4.7/8″ squares.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangles.  Press the seam allowances towards the dark fabric and trim the corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Layout for quilt block one

Layout for quilt block one

Sew the squares in pairs

Sew the squares in pairs

Make quilt block one

This is the one that made me think of four people whirling around in a dance.

Lay the patchwork squares out as shown in the photo.  This is classified as a five patch block but the differing sizes of the patches mean that it is not quite as straightforward as five rows of five.  Sew the yellow half square triangles together in pairs – two of them with the squares side by side and two of them with the square beneath them.  Sew the two large pink half square triangles in pairs.

Complete the two halves of the quilt block

Complete the two halves of the quilt block

Now you can sew the squares together across the rows.  The simplest way is to make up the two halves of the quilt block and then sew the two halves together, so you need to sew rows one and two to each other first and then add the rectangle.

You will need eight of these blocks.

Quilt block two layout

Quilt block two layout

Make quilt block two

Lay the patchwork squares out in three rows of three.  The pieces in this quilt block are almost all the same size so this one is more straightforward to sew together.

I forgot to take a photo of the green four patch unit in the bottom right corner of the block, but it is made with two 2.1/2″ green squares and two green/cream half square triangles.  You need to sew these together first.  Then the rest of the block can be made by simply sewing the squares together across each row and then sewing the rows to each other.  You will also need eight of these blocks.

Rows one and two of the quilt

Rows one and two of the quilt

Assembling the barn dance quilt

The main feature of this quilt is the green diamond formed in the middle of the quilt, so that’s the easiest way to describe the layout of the blocks.  The blocks are laid out in four rows of four.  Row one is made with quilt block one at each end and two of quilt block two in the middle.  Rotate the central blocks so that the two green triangles form a larger green triangle as shown.

Row two has two of quilt block one in the middle with a quilt block two at each end.  Place the end blocks so that the green triangles continue the diamond shape, extending the green to the edges of the quilt.

Final two rows of the quilt

Final two rows of the quilt

Row three has two of quilt block one in the middle again and one quilt block two at each end.  These are rotated so that the green triangles point down from each edge towards the middle.

Row four is the same as row one but with the green triangles coming to a point at the bottom of the quilt.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Barn dance quilt border

Barn dance quilt border

Barn dance quilt border

Obviously I couldn’t stop myself adding some blue to this quilt pattern, so I have used 3.1/2″ blue strips for the border.  You will need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the barn dance quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found towards the bottom of the beginner quilting page.

Here’s the video:

Long arm quilting machine

Long arm quilting machine

Those of you who follow my blog will know that I bought a longarm quilting machine recently.  It arrived in lots of boxes and I foolishly believed the instructions that said it would take two to four hours to put it all together.

Eventually, I had to call in a friend to help me put it all together.  Then I felt slightly intimidated by this huge thing dominating the room. It was suggested to me (thank you, Carole) that the machine and I would become better acquainted if I named it – so it’s over to you:  can you help me by suggesting a name for my longarm.  I would love to see your suggestions – just leave your ideas in the comments section below and I’ll let you know next week which one I have chosen.

Catherine Wheel Quilt

Catherine wheel quilt

Catherine wheel quilt

I’ve taken the name for the Catherine Wheel quilt from one of the many suggestions that I received when I asked for quilt name suggestions a while ago.  It’s a very simple quilt, made using half square triangles and four patch units only.  I have made it 36″ square and I have used 3/4 yard each of red, white and blue fabrics.

Cutting requirements

4.7/8″ squares:  four each of blue and white, four each of blue and red, eight each of red and white

2.1/2″ squares: one 2.1/2″ strip cut across the width of of red and blue, with two strips of white

For the border:  four 2.1/2″ strips of blue fabric




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making each quilt block

Use the 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowance towards the dark fabric and trim the corners.

Sew strips of fabric together

Sew strips of fabric together

Make four patch units

Make four patch units

 

The four patch units can be made using strip piecing.  Sew together one strip of red and white fabric and make a separate panel of a blue and a white strip.  Cut these panels at 2.1/2″ intervals to make strips that are one square white with one square of either red or blue.

Sew two of these strips together to make four patch units.

Quilt block layout

Quilt block layout

Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Lay the patchwork squares out in four rows of four.  If you haven’t already done so, sew the pairs of squares together to form the four patch units.  All the squares will then be the same size and you can sew them together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.

Make four of these.

Rotate the blocks to form the quilt design

Rotate the blocks to form the quilt design

Assembling the Catherine wheel quilt

Sew the quilt blocks together in two pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  You will need to rotate the blocks in order to get the quilt design:  in the top left block have the small blue squares running from bottom left to top right.  In the top right block you will need to line the blue squares from top left to bottom right.  For the bottom left block place the blue squares to run from top left to bottom right and for the bottom right block have the blue squares running from bottom left to top right.

The Catherine wheel quilt now just needs a simple border to frame it.  I have used 2.1/2″ strips of blue fabric for this.  Cut two lengths of 32.1/2″  and sew these to the top and bottom of the quilt.  Cut two lengths of 36.1/2″ and sew these to the sides of the quilt.

Apart from the fact that I didn’t line the squares up very well, it’s turned into quite a bright and cheerful quilt.  Note to self:  could do better!

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Faberge Egg Style Quilt

Faberge egg style quilt

Faberge egg style quilt

For this Faberge Egg style quilt pattern I began with the steeple and weathervane quilt block:  this is a nine patch block attributed to Nancy Cabot and quite simple but effective.  I used purple and gold for part of the block because steeples are usually set on churches, but then the colours reminded me of Cadburys Cream Eggs so I revised the layout to give more of an egg shape.  The rich colouring then brought to mind Faberge eggs.  I’d like to pretend that I’m terribly organised and plan my quilts in advance, but as you can tell from that my patterns tend to make themselves up as I go along!

The finished quilt measures 52″ by 40″ and I have used 1.1/4 yards each of purple and lilac with 3/4 yard of gold – it’s actually a metallic yellow fabric.




Cutting requirements

3.1/2″ squares: eight lilac

3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  eight lilac, four gold

3.7/8″ squares:  sixty each in purple and lilac, twenty each in purple and gold

For the border:  five 2.1/2″ strips of gold fabric cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making half square triangles

Make half square triangles with the 3.7/8″ squares in purple/lilac and in purple/gold.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will give you two half square triangles which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowance towards the purple fabric and trim the corners to reduce bulk in the seams.

Steeple and weathervane quilt block

Steeple and weathervane quilt block layout

Steeple and weathervane quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in six rows of six.  The first two rows represent the weathervane and are made entirely from purple/lilac half square triangles.  The next four rows represent the steeple.  Make row three with two lilac rectangles with two half square triangles in the middle.

For the fourth row place a lilac square at each end, two purple/gold half square triangles in the middle and a purple/lilac half square triangle either side of the centre.  Row five is made using two purple/lilac and four purple/gold half square triangles.  Row six has the gold rectangle in the middle with two purple/gold half square triangles on either side.  In each corner the four half square triangles are placed so that they form a shape like an arrow head – I always find that these sort of shapes help me to place the squares correctly.

Back view of the steeple and weathervane quilt block

Back view of the steeple and weathervane quilt block

 

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  You need to make four of the steeple and weathervane quilt blocks.

There are a lot of half square triangles in this block which can make the seams quite bulky.  In order to help a little with this, I have pressed some of the seams open – that’s why I’ve shown you the back view of the block here.

It’s okay to have a combination of seams that are pressed to one side with seams that have been pressed open.

 

Sew the blocks in pairs

Sew the blocks in pairs

Sew the four quilt blocks together

Sew the four quilt blocks together

Assembling the Faberge egg style quilt

Sew the quilt blocks together in pairs with the yellow squares at the bottom of the blocks.

Flip one pair of blocks so that the yellow edge is at the top and sew the pairs of blocks to each other.  At this stage you have the two Faberge eggs in the middle with weathervanes along the top and bottom but nothing down the sides.

Make four more weathervanes

Make four more weathervanes

Sew weathervanes to each side of the quilt

Sew weathervanes to each side of the quilt

Make four more weathervanes.  That’s the first two rows of the original steeple and weathervane quilt block.  Make each one using twelve purple/lilac half square triangles.  Sew these together in pairs.  This will give you two strips 6.1/2″ wide by 36.1/2″ long.

Sew one strip to either side of the quilt so that the eggs in the middle of the quilt now have weathervanes all round them.

Quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of gold fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the long edges and two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the remaining two edges.

That completes the Faberge egg style quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.

Here’s the video:

Fabric giveaway

Fabric giveaway

Guess the name competition

Thank you once again for your participation in the naming the quilt competition – both with providing a huge number of imaginative names and with voting for them afterwards.  I counted up the votes last night:  there were votes across all the groups, but the group with the most votes was group 3.  That was Birds in flight/Lost winds/Blowing in the wind/Catch the wind.  All beautiful names.

Which brings us of course to the fabric giveaway.  For this I used the names of everyone who had submitted a name suggestion and drew one of the names out of a bowl.  The winner is:  Patricia Eason.  Well done, Patricia.  I have emailed you to ask for your postal address.  I’ve given you my personal email address as I have had trouble in the past with emails not getting through to the webmail address.

Thanks once again to everyone who participated.

Royal quilt – Free Pattern

Royal quilt pattern

Royal quilt pattern

I know that I have used an uninteresting name for this quilt pattern, but inspiration deserted me.  Do please let me know if you can think of a more exiciting name for it.  If you look closely you’ll see that it’s made from a few very simple blocks.  The colours are very different from my normal choices, but purple and gold do give a wonderfully rich look to a quilt.  When I began to design this quilt, I decided that I wanted a pinwheel in the middle with some sort of barn raising type design around it.  I laid out the squares and then went away and thought about it.  Gradually throughout yesterday I tinkered with the placement of the quilt blocks until I ended up with a completely different design – but one that I like a lot!




The quilt measures 58″ square and I have used 1.3/4 yards of the purple and 2 yards of the gold.  I’ve used a lot of strip piecing to speed things up.

Cutting requirements for the royal quilt

6.7/8″ squares:  twelve each in purple and gold

6.1/2″ squares:  eight each in purple and gold

2.1/2″ strips:  twelve strips of both fabrics cut across the width of fabric, plus an additional six strips of gold for the border.

Making the half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Use the 6.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place one purple and one gold square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangles.  You will need twenty four half square triangle units (made from twelve purple and twelve gold squares).

Making the nine patch units

Sew three strips together

Sew three strips together

These units are much quicker to make if you use some strip piecing.  Sew together 2.1/2″ strips in one panel of purple, gold, purple  and another panel of gold, purple, gold.  Press the seam allowances all the same way on each panel – it will make it more easy to nest them when you sew strips together.

Cut at 2.1/2″ intervals so that you have strips 2.1/2″ wide by 6.1/2″ long.

Make nine patch quilt blocks

Make nine patch quilt blocks

Each nine patch unit can be made with one strip of gold/purple/gold and two strips of purple/gold/purple.  Sew the three strips to each other to complete one nine patch quilt block.  You will need twenty eight nine patch blocks so cut fifty six of the purple/gold/purple strips and twenty eight of the gold/purple/gold strips.

Make stripey quilt blocks

Make stripey quilt blocks

Using the light/dark/light panels only, cut at 6.1/2″ intervals to make 6.1/2″ square stripey quilt blocks.  You will need twelve of these.

Along with the plain 6.1/2″ squares in both purple and gold, you now have all the blocks made ready to begin making the quilt.

 

Assembling the royal quilt top – first 3 rows

This quilt design is symmetrical in all directions which makes it more easy to put together:  once you have laid out all the quilt blocks, you can keep checking one side against the other to make sure that you have everything in the right place and facing in the right direction.

First three rows of the royal quilt

First three rows of the royal quilt

The first row has a purple square at each end and in the middle.  On each side of the middle square there are a half square triangle, a stripey block and a nine patch unit.

The second row has a half square triangle at each end and a nine patch block in the middle.  On either side of the central square are a plain gold square, a nine patch unit and a half square triangle.

The third row has a stripey square at each end with the stripe placed vertically and a plain gold square in the middle.  On either side of the central square are two nine patch units and a half square triangle.

Rows 4 to 8

Rows four to six of the quilt

Rows four to six of the quilt

Make the fourth row with a nine patch at each end and a vertical stripe in the middle.  On either side place a nine patch unit and two half square triangles.  The two half square triangles are placed to form a diamond shape.

Row five is the central row of the quilt.  It has a purple square at each end and a nine patch in the middle.  On either side there are a nine patch, a plain gold square and a stripey block with the stripe horizontal.

Row six is where the quilt pattern begins to repeat itself, so it is made with the same blocks as row four, but with the triangles placed differently.

Final three rows of the quilt

Final three rows of the quilt

Row seven uses the same blocks as row three.  Row eight uses the same blocks as those used in row two and the ninth row has the same blocks as the first row.  In each case the triangles are angled so that the design draws in towards the middle.

Sew all the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Royal quilt border

Royal quilt border

For the border I have just used a simple gold 2.1/2″ strip.  You will need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the sides.  The royal quilt is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video: