Blue Bargello Quilt Pattern

Blue bargello quilt

Blue bargello quilt

I’m thrilled with the way this blue bargello quilt has turned out.  I’ve used patches of differing sizes to create the feeling of movement.  The squares and rectangles are 4″, 3″, 2″ or 1″.  However the method of making the quilt differs from the more traditional bargello where you create loops of patches and break into them to create the design.  Instead I have used strip piecing to create panels which use all the different sizes of patches.  An incredibly easy quilt to make, using sixteen 10″ square blocks.

The quilt measures 56″ square and it takes 1/2 yard each of three different blues with 1.1/2 yards of white fabric.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the blue bargello quilt

Dark blue:  two strips 4.1/2″ wide, one strip 3.1/2″ wide, one strip 2.1/2″ wide and two strips 1.1/2″ wide

Medium blue:  two strips 4.1/2″ wide, two strips 3.1/2″ wide, one strip 2.1/2″ wide, one strip 1.1/2″ wide

Light blue:  one strip 4.1/2″ wide, two strips 3.1/2″ wide, two strips 2.1/2″ wide, one strip 1.1/2″ wide

White:  one strip 4.1/2″ wide, one strip 3.1/2″ wide, two strips 2.1/2″ wide, two strips 1.1/2″ wide.

First strip panel

First strip panel

Make the strip panels

Sew together two panels, each one with one 4.1/2″ strip of dark blue, one 3.1/2″ strip of medium blue, one 2.1/2″ strip of light blue and one 1.1/2″ strip of white.  Cut these panels at 4.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 4.1/2″ by 10.1/2″.  You need sixteen of these rectangles.

Cut only the sixteen that you need so that you can use the remainder of the panel for the second border.  The same applies to all the panels.

Second strip panel

Second strip panel

For the second strip panel sew together two panels, each one with a 4.1/2″ strip of medium blue, 3.1/2″ strip of light blue, 2.1/2″ strip of white and 1.1/2″ strip of white fabric.  Cut these panels at 3.1/2″ intervals and make sixteen of these rectangles.

Third panel

Third panel

Make the third panel with a 4.1/2″ strip of light blue, 3.1/2″ strip of white, 2.1/2″ strip of dark blue and a 1.1/2″ strip of medium blue.  You only need one of this panel.  Cut it at 2.1/2″ intervals to make sixteen rectangles.

Fourth panel

Fourth panel

Finally for the fourth panel sew together a 4.1/2″ strip of 4.1/2″ white, 3.1/2″ strip of dark blue, 2.1/2″ strip of medium blue, 1.1/2″ strip of light blue.  You need just one of this panel.  Cut it at 1.1/2″ intervals to make sixteen rectangles.

Press the seam allowances in opposite directions

Press the seam allowances in opposite directions

When you press the strip panels, press the seam allowances in one direction for the 4.1/2″ and 2.1/2″ strips.  Press them in the opposite direction for the 3.1/2″ and 1.1/2″ strips.  That way your seams will nest together when you sew the rectangles together.  The photo shows the back view of the block.

Quilt block layout

Quilt block layout

Make the blue bargello quilt block

Take one rectangle from each of the four panels.  Lay them out as shown in decreasing order with the 4.1/2″ strip of the left and the 1.1/2″ strip on the right.  Sew the strips together to complete the block – really simple, isn’t it!

The block measures 10.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make sixteen of them.

Rows one and two

Rows one and two

Assemble the blue bargello quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  In order to construct the design you need to rotate the blocks.  Use the 4.1/2″ dark blue square as your reference.  In row one this square is placed bottom right, bottom right, bottom left and bottom left.

For the second row place the dark blue square top right, bottom right, bottom left and top left.  You can see where the two dark blue squares together form rectangles as a guide, and the white patches are forming the top half of circles.

Rows three and four

Rows three and four

For row three place the dark blue square bottom right, top right, top left and bottom left.

In row four you need to place the dark blue square top right, top right, top left and top left.  You still have several dark blue rectangles forming and the white patches are now forming the lower half of circles.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

First border

First border

Add the borders

For the first border I used 3.1/2″ strips of white fabric. This was to help the design of the quilt to stand out.  You’ll need two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 46.1/2″ for the sides.

Use the remaining strip sets

Use the remaining strip sets

For the second border I wanted to use up the remaining sections of the strip panels.  I cut all the remaining pieces into 2.1/2″ widths.  Luckily I ended up with twenty of these rectangles which was just what I needed.  I sewed them together in four rows of five strips, giving me four 50.1/2″ lengths.

Second border

Second border

For the border I needed two lengths of 46.1/2″ and two lengths of 50.1/2″, so I could trim two of the lengths for the top and bottom and use the full lengths for the sides.

If you don’t manage to cut twenty 2.1/2″ strips from your leftovers you can always just add some extra 2.1/2″ sections of one of the blues.

Third border

Third border

Third and final border

For the final border I used 3.1/2″ strips of white again.  You’ll need two lengths of 50.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 56.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the blue bargello quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/xOeQ6hhWdOM

Birmingham Peace Garden

Birmingham Peace Garden

Last week I visited somewhere that I’ve wanted to see for a long time.  I’ve seen it from the bus on my way into town but never actually got round to stopping off to see it.  It’s the St Thomas Peace Garden and to see my photos click here or click on the photo.

Busy, busy weekend coming up – I’m off to London to see the family tomorrow, then on Sunday I have a craft stall in Cannon Hill Park and on Monday it’s back to London to go to Wimbledon with my daughter.  We have tickets for Number One Court which is very exciting.

Whirligig Cross Quilt Pattern

Whirligig cross quilt

Whirligig cross quilt

I’ve made the Whirligig Cross quilt using my favourite colours of red, blue and white.  I began with five whirligig blocks in a cross shape, added some half square triangles to create a diamond affect and then added three borders to the quilt.  It measures 54″ square and I have used 1 yard of light blue, 3/4 yard of white, 1.1/4 yards of dark blue and 1.1/2 yards of red fabric.   The quilt is constructed with nine 12″ blocks finished size.  There are three borders to provide a good solid frame for the quilt.  The blue and white squares were intended to look like the edges of an old fashioned film spool.

As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the whirligig cross quilt

12.7/8″ squares:  two light blue, two dark blue

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty each in red and white, ten each in light blue and white, ten each in dark blue and light blue

For borders one and three you will need to cut nine 3.1/2″ strips of red fabric across the width of fabric

For border two you will need thirty 3.1/2″ dark blue squares and thirty 3.1/2″ white squares.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Whirligig block layout

Whirligig block layout

Make the whirligig block

This block uses half square triangles only.  It is also known as a mosaic block.  Lay the pieces out in four rows of four.  Begin with four dark blue/light blue half square triangles in the middle.  Across each corner place two red/white half square triangles.  The red triangles together form a stripe across each corner.  In the remaining four spaces place a light blue/white half square triangle.  The light blue triangles form a stripe with the light blue from the central area.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  This block now measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make five of them.

Corner blocks

Corner blocks

Make the corner blocks

Cut the 12.7/8″ squares along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square.  Sew a dark blue and a light blue triangle together – that’s the corner block complete!  The block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make four of them.

First two rows

First two rows

Assemble the whirligig cross quilt

Lay the blocks out in three rows of three.

In row one lay a corner block at each end with a whirligig block in the middle.  Make sure that the dark blue triangles are at the top, forming the corners of the quilt.  For row you just need three whirligig blocks placed side by side.

Row three

Row three

For the third row place a corner block at each end with a whirligig block in the middle.  This time place the dark blue triangles at the bottom so that they form the bottom corners of the whirligig cross quilt.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

First border

First border

Add the quilt borders

For the first border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 42.1/2″ for the sides.

Sew together blue and white strips

Sew together blue and white strips

In the second border I used alternating squares of blue and white.  I was aiming for the sort of look that you get from the old fashioned film spools.  The simplest way to make this border is to sew together 3.1/2″ strips of blue and white along the length.  Cut the resulting panel at 3.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″.

Make strips of blue and white

Make strips of blue and white

Sew these together side by side to make strips of squares.  You’ll need two lengths of fourteen squares for the top and bottom of the quilt, together with two lengths of sixteen squares for the sides.

Third border

Third border

Finally for the third border I used 3.1/2″ strips of red again.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/od3hWa-rd70

Beautiful Prague

Beautiful Prague

When I visited Prague Patchwork I spent a few days exploring Prague itself.  To see my photos of this beautiful city click here or click on the photo.

Many thanks for all the lovely birthday wishes you sent me two weeks ago.  Unusually for me, I actually held a party last Sunday to celebrate.  We had a lovely day but I’m still eating the leftovers!

Michigan Beauty Quilt Pattern

Michigan Beauty quilt

Michigan Beauty quilt

I’ve made the Michigan Beauty quilt using the block of the same name and an alternate block of my own design which I tried to make as much the reverse of it as I could.  My plan was to make an interesting quilt with plenty to look at.  The first block has lilac in the middle with white outside it while the alternate has white in the middle with lilac outside it.  The green flower shapes point outwards in the first block and inwards in the alternate block.

The quilt measures 58″ square.  I have used nine 18″ blocks, needing 1.1/2 yards each of white and blue with 3/4 yard each of green and lilac.  As ever, you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the Michigan Beauty quilt

3,1.2″ squares:  thirty six green, sixteen lilac, twenty white

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  ten lilac

3.7.8″ squares:  thirty six each in green and white, twenty eight each in blue and white, thirty six each in blue and lilac

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ blue strips across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Central area

Central area

Make the Michigan Beauty quilt block

Begin with the two 6.1/2″ lilac rectangles in the middle of the block.  Place a pair of blue/lilac half square triangles on each edge of this central square.  Make sure that the lilac triangles are together, forming a larger lilac triangle pointing away from the middle.  Add a green square in each corner.

Michigan Beauty quilt block layout

Michigan Beauty quilt block layout

For the outer frame, place a pair of blue/white half square triangles in the middle of each edge.  Add a green/white half square triangle on each side of the blue/white half square triangles.  Place a white square in each corner.  Note that the blue triangles together form a larger blue triangle pointing outwards and the white triangles together form larger white triangles pointing inwards.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  At this stage it measures 18.1/2″ square and you need to make five of these.

Alternate block centre

Alternate block centre

Make the alternate block

Place four blue/white half square triangles in the middle.  Lay them so that the white triangles together form a diamond in the middle.  Add a pair of blue/lilac half square triangles on each edge of the central square.  Lay them so that the blue triangles together form a larger blue triangle pointing outwards.

Add a lilac square in each corner.

Alternate block layout

Alternate block layout

For the outer frame place a pair of white squares in the middle of each edge.  Add a green/white half square triangle on each side of the white squares.  The white pieces should now form a mountain shape on each edge.  Add a green square in each corner.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  At this stage the block measures 18.1/2″ square and you need to make four of these.

Blue quilt border

Blue quilt border

Add the border

Use the 2.1/2″ blue strips for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Michigan Beauty quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/HSHboNtxEcU

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

While I was in Spain for the Sitges quilt festival I had time for some sightseeing in Barcelona.  The lovely Sagrada Familia, still being constructed after over 100 years, was top of my list of places to see.  What a treat!  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.

Thanks so much for all the lovely comments about my demonstrations on Sewing Quarter.  I had a wonderful morning there – they were all so welcoming and friendly that I felt far more relaxed than I had expected to.  I don’t have any more dates yet, but will definitely let you know when I do.

Interlocking Squares Quilt Pattern

Interlocking squares

Interlocking squares quilt

For this Interlocking Squares quilt I have begun with the interlocking squares quilt block and then surrounded it with Millwheel quilt blocks.  I’ve used pink and blue which are not my usual colour choices and have decided that I should be more adventurous in my fabric choices.  The quilt measures 52″ square and I have used 1.1/4 yards of light pink fabric, 1/2 yard of dark pink, together with 1.1/2 yards of dark blue and 3/4 yard of light blue.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

The quilt blocks are all 16″ square finished size – one interlinked squares block and eight millwheel blocks.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the interlocking squares quilt

4.7/8″ squares:  sixty four light pink, thirty two dark blue, sixteen light pink, sixteen dark pink

2.1/2″ squares:  eight dark blue, four light blue, four dark pink

2.7/8″ squares:  two each in dark pink and light blue, two each in dark pink and light pink, four each in light pink and light blue, four each in light pink and dark blue

4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  two light blue

6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  four dark blue

8.1/2″ by s.1/2″ rectangles:  two light blue

For the border you will need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the millwheel quilt blocks

Use the 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ square either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This gives you two half square triangles which are now 4.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and clip the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Millwheel block layout

Millwheel block layout

Lay these squares out in four rows of four.  Begin with four light pink/dark pink half square triangles in the middle.  Lay these so that the dark pink triangles form a diamond in the middle.  On each edge of this central square place a dark blue/pink and a light blue/pink half square triangle.  Lay these so that the pink triangles together form a larger light pink triangle pointing towards the middle.  Now add a dark blue/light pink half square triangle in each corner with the pink on the outside.  Check that the dark blue triangles come together in pairs to make larger blue triangles.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It measures 16.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make eight of them.

Central area

Central area

Make the interlocking squares quilt block

For this block I have made half square triangles using the 3.7/8″ squares made in the same way as those above.  Begin with two 8.1/2″ light blue strips in the middle.  Place a 4.1/2″ light blue strip above and below with a light blue/light pink half square triangle in each corner of this central area.  Place these so that the pink is on the outside.

First frame

First frame

Now add the first frame.  Across the top lay one light blue square followed by a light blue/dark pink  half square triangle, one dark pink square, one dark pink/light pink half square triangle, one light pink/light blue half square triangle and finish with a light blue square.  Notice that the dark pink patches form a mountain shape.  Repeat this sequence down the right hand side, across the bottom and up the left hand side of the block.

Complete layout

Complete layout

The final frame is very simple.  On the top and bottom rows place a 6.1/2″ dark blue strip on each end with a pair of dark blue/light pink half square triangles in the middle.  Place these so that the light pink triangles form a larger pink triangle pointing away from the middle.

On the sides place a pair of dark blue squares at each end with the pair of dark blue/light pink half square triangles in the middle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the interlocking squares quilt block.  This now measures 16.1/2″ square and you just need to make the one.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Rows one and three are simply three millwheel blocks sewn together in a row.

Row two

Row two

In row two place a millwheel block at each end with an interlocking squares quilt block in the middle.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Blue border

Blue border

Add the border

Using the 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue, make two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the interlocking squares quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/sWPyD4MJpnU

Sitges quilt show 2019

Sitges quilt show 2019

Recently I visited the Sitges quilt show in Spain.  Quilt shows in other countries always have a different feel to them – as well as gorgeous quilts.  To see my photos of the show click on the photo or click here.

Recently the Sewing Quarter TV channel invited me to design and demonstrate for them.  I designed a quilt that I have called Floral Dance and I’ll be demonstrating it for them on Thursday 25th April.  If you can’t find their channel then there is always youtube.

Budapest Quilt Pattern – Floor Tile Design

Budapest quilt

Budapest quilt

The Budapest quilt design is based on floor tiles that I saw on my recent visit to Hungary.  You can find a link to the photos from that trip at the bottom of the page.  The quilt measures 67″ square, using nine 15″ blocks with three borders.

For the borders I have used blue strips for borders 1 and 3, with a smaller version of the central block for border 2.

I have used 2.1/2 yards of cream fabric, 1.3/4 yards of red and 1.1/2 yards of blue.




Original tile design

Original tile design

There were so many wonderful buildings from which to choose a design that it was difficult to choose one, but the quilt is loosely based on the tiles in this photo.

Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the Budapest quilt

Central block:  one 11.1/8″ red square, two 8.3/8″ cream squares

Cross block:  sixteen 6.1/2″ cream squares, sixteen 3.1/2″ cream squares, twenty 3.1/2″ red squares

Third block:  sixteen 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ cream rectangles, sixteen 3.1/2″ cream squares, eight 3.1/2″ red squares, eight 9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ red rectangles, four 14.1/2″ by 3..1/2″ red rectangles

For borders 1 and 3 you will need to cut twelve 2.1/2″ blue strips across the width of fabric

For border 2 you will need thirty two 5.1/2″ red squares and sixty four 4.3/8″ cream squares.

Central block layout

Central block layout

Make the central block

I have made a simple diamond in a square block for the middle of the Budapest quilt.  Cut the 8.3/8″ cream squares along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square.  Place one cream triangle on each edge of the 11.1/8″ red square.

Sew the two side triangles first

Sew the two side triangles first

Sew two opposite triangles on to the square, press them open and then add the remaining two triangles.

Trim the middle of each edge where the triangle tips stick out.  The block now measures 15.1/2″ square and you just need to make one.

Cross block layout

Cross block layout

Make the cross block

The layout for this block is very simple.  Place a 6.1/2″ cream square in each corner.  Between the top two corners place a cream and then a red 3.1/2″ square.  For the bottom two corners place a red and then a cream 3.1/2″ square.  Make the middle row with a 9.1/2″ red strip in the middle and a 3.1/2″ cream square at each end.

Sew the red and cream squares together first and then you’ll be able to sew all the pieces together in three distinct rows.  Sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

The cross quilt block now measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of these.

Layout for the third block

Layout for the third block

Make the third block

In the third block I have tried to use rectangles rather than individual squares as much as possible in order to save time sewing the block.

Make rows one and five with a red square in the middle and a 6.1/2″ red rectangle on either side.

Rows two and four contain a 9.1/2″ red rectangle with a cream square at each end.

For row 3 you just need one 15.1/2″ red rectangle.  Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It now measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the Budapest quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Rows one and three are the same as each other, with a cross block in the middle and a third block on either side.

Row two

Row two

For row two place the diamond in a square block in the middle with a cross block on either side of it.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  At this stage the Budapest quilt top measures 45.1/2″ square.

First border

First border

Add the first quilt border

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ blue strips to separate the main quilt from the borders.  You will need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

Add the second border

Make smaller blocks

Make smaller blocks

In the second border I have used a reduced version of the central diamond in a square block.  This time I used 5.1/2″ red squares surrounded by triangles made by cutting 4.3/8″ cream squares along one diagonal.  Don’t forget to trim the edges of the block where the triangle tips stick out.  Each block now measures 7.1/2″ square and you need to make thirty two of them.

Press the seam allowances open

Press the seam allowances open

Sew the blocks together in two rows of seven blocks and two rows of nine blocks.  I have pressed the seam allowances open along these strips as the middle of the seam can be quite bulky.

Border two

Border two

Sew one row of seven blocks to the top of the quilt and one to the bottom.

Sew one row of nine blocks to each side of the quilt.

Border three

Border three

Third quilt border

Finally for the third border I have returned to the 2.1/2″ strips of blue fabric.  You need two lengths of 63.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt with two lengths of 67.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Budapest quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

River Danube and Budapest

River Danube and Budapest

As I mentioned at the start of the page, this quilt was inspired by my trip to Budapest in Hungary.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.

The weather seems to be doing strange things all across the world and I hope that you can stay safe and warm over the weekend.

 

Church Tile Quilt – Free Pattern

Church Tile Quilt

Church Tile Quilt

My design for the Church Tile quilt is based on a panel behind the altar in a church that I visited last weekend.  It’s an incredibly quick quilt to make, using mostly squares only.  I don’t have a photo of the panel itself – I didn’t take my phone with me in case it went off during the service and then of course when I saw the tiling I wished that I had it with me.

The quilt measures 46″ by 55″, using 1.1/4 yards of purple, 1/2 yard of green and 3/4 yard each of lilac and gold fabrics.  I’ve used a diagonal setting to create the effect that I wanted and there are very few triangles in the quilt – just round the edges.  The beauty of a diagonal setting is that you can create a design that looks like diamonds but use only squares – nice and easy to sew together.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the church tile quilt

6.1/2″ squares:  four gold, thirty four purple, four lilac, eight green

6.7/8″ squares:  nine lilac

7.1/4″ squares:  one lilac

For the border you need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips of gold fabric across the width of fabric.

Cut the triangles

Cut the triangles

Cut the triangles

To make the corner triangles, cut the 7.1/4″ square along both diagonals.  Make the edge triangles by cutting the 6.7/8″ squares along one diagonal only – two from each square.  These are the only triangles used within the pattern – the rest of the quilt is made using squares only.

Assemble the quilt – top half

Begin the layout in the top lefthand corner of the quilt with one corner triangle – cut from the 7.1/4″ lilac square.

First three rows

First three rows

Beneath that for the second row place an edge triangle on either side of a purple square.  Place the edge triangles (cut from 6.7/8″ squares) so that the right angled corner (the square corner) lies against the square between them.  So it’s bottom right in the first triangle and bottom left in the other one at the end of the row.  The longest edge of the triangle lies on the outside, forming the edge of the quilt.

In the third row place an edge triangle at each end of the row, with a purple, gold and purple square between them.  Place the edge triangles in the same way as those in the row above.  As you can see, the rows are increasing in length.  Each row has two more squares than the row above it.

Rows four and five

Rows four and five

I find it easiest to sew the patches across each row and sew the rows together as I go along – I’m less likely to get in a muddle that way.

In rows four and five place an edge triangle at each end of the rows.  The fourth row contains purple and green alternating squares, beginning and ending with purple.

The fifth row contains five purple squares followed by one green and then another purple square.

Assemble the quilt – middle section

Rows six and seven

Rows six and seven

By now I hope you can see the design of the quilt starting to take shape.  The lilac triangles are forming the left hand and the top edges of the quilt.  Rows six and seven use the same squares as each other, but placed in the opposite order to each other.

Bottom left corner of the quilt

Bottom left corner of the quilt

For row six you need them in this order:  purple, green, purple, lilac, green, two purple, gold, purple.  Place an edge triangle at the beginning of this row and a corner triangle at the end of the row.

This will form the top right hand corner of the quilt.

Other end of rows six and seven

Other end of rows six and seven

In row seven begin with a corner triangle.  Following this place the squares in the reverse order from row six:  purple, gold, two purple, green, lilac, purple, green, purple.  Finish this row with an edge triangle.

As this row begins to form the right hand edge of the quilt, you need to place the final edge triangle in a different way from all the previous rows.  In this case the square corner of the triangle must be placed at the top rather than the bottom of the square next to it.  You can see from the photo that this begins to form a straight line down the side of the quilt.  From now on all the edge triangles will be placed in this way as we work towards the bottom right hand corner of the quilt.

Assemble the quilt – bottom section

The rows now begin to reduce in length.  From row one the number of squares increased by two squares in each row.  Rows six and seven had the same number of squares as each other but from row eight the rows begin to decrease with two squares less in each row.

Bottom right hand corner

Bottom right hand corner

In row eight place an edge triangle at each end of the row.  Between them lay a purple, green and five purple squares.  This is the same as row five but with the squares in reverse order.

For row nine place an edge triangle at each end with purple and green squares alternating between them – purple, green, purple, green, purple.

Row ten contains only three squares between the edge triangles – purple, gold, purple.

Now you can form the bottom right hand corner of the quilt – for row eleven place just one purple square between two edge triangles.  For row twelve use the final corner triangle.  That completes the layout of the rows – continue sewing them to each other as you go along.

Use gold for the border

Use gold for the border

Add the quilt border

As all the edges of this quilt are cut on the bias, having been cut from the diagonals of the squares, it’s a good idea to get the border on as quickly as you can.  This will help prevent the fabric from stretching.  Use 2.1/2″ strips of gold fabric – two lengths of 42.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 55.1/2″ for the sides.

Trim the edges

Trim the edges

Before you sew the border on, trim the edges of the quilt where the triangle tips stick out.

That completes the Church Tile quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey

Last week I mentioned that I was going to Wiltshire for the weekend.  To see my photos of the area, click here or click on the photo.

Over the years I have accumulated vast quantities of part finished quilts, never having time to complete them.  My cupboards are filled with PHD’s (project half done).

After a lot of thought I have decided that it’s time to give myself time to start completing these quilts.  So from now on I am only going to send out one new pattern every other Friday rather than every Friday.  That means that the next pattern will come to you on Friday 6th July rather than next Friday – and I hope I’ll be able to bring you some news of finished quilts then!

London Underground Quilt Pattern

London Underground quilt

London Underground quilt

The London Underground quilt pattern is based on the fabric used in the seating on a lot of the carriages.  While sitting there waiting to reach my destination I couldn’t help noticing what a good quilt design the seating would make.

Original seating design

Original seating design

The rectangular quilt measures 63″ by 83″, using 1.1/4 yards of white fabric, 2.1/2 yards of red and 3.1/2 yards of blue.  The quilt uses two different but very simple blocks and I’ve used twelve of the first block and six of the second.  They all measure 14″ square.




London underground quilt blocks completed

London underground quilt blocks completed

Cutting requirements for the London underground quilt

2,1/2″ squares:  ninety six blue, fifty four red, ninety six white

10.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips:  twenty four blue

14.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips:  twelve blue

6.1/2″ by 14.1/2″ rectangles:  twelve blue

2.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ strips:  twelve blue, forty eight white

10.1/4″ squares:  one red

14.7/8″ squares:  five red

For the border you will need to cut seven 2.1/2″ blue strips across the width of fabric.

Make the first block

This first block contains four red squares and a broken white frame while the second block is just one red square on a blue background.

First block layout

First block layout

The first block contains seven rows.  In rows one and seven place a 6.1/2″ white strip on either side with a blue square in the middle.

Rows two and six are made with a white square at each end and a 10.1/2″ blue strip in the middle.

For rows three and five you need alternating squares:  white, blue, red, blue, red, blue, white.

Finally row four, the central row contains just a 14.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ blue strip.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It measures 14.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make twelve of them.

Second quilt block layout

Second quilt block layout

Make the second block

The second block is even more easy to make.  Place a 14.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ blue rectangle at top and bottom.  For the middle row place a 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ blue rectangle either side of a red square.

Sew the pieces of the middle row together first and then sew all three pieces to each other.

The block also measures 14.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make six of them.

Cut the triangles

Cut the triangles

The triangles

In addition to the quilt blocks, this design also needs red triangles in the corners and at each end of the rows.

For the corners I have used a 10.1/2″ red square cut across both diagonals to make four triangles.  At the ends of each row a bigger triangle is needed:  I have used 14.7/8″ squares cut along one diagonal only.  I know that the red squares look the wrong size relative to each other, but that’s for the simple reason that I miscalculated and used half size squares before I realised my mistake.

Rows 1,2 and 3

Rows 1, 2 and 3

First 4 rows of the London underground quilt

I have used a diagonal setting for this quilt.  That means that the layout begins in the top left hand corner of the quilt, rather than being made up of horizontal rows of blocks.

I am counting row one as the red corner triangle at the top of the photo.  This comes from a 10.1/4″ red square.  Make row two with a 4 square block beneath the corner triangle and a red side triangle (from 14.7/8″ squares) on either side of it.  Check the photo to be sure of the placement of these triangles – the right angle (square) corner of the triangle is placed against the bottom of the quilt block.

Make row three with three blocks and a red side triangle at each end.  Now you can see the sides of the quilt beginning to form – the red triangles are forming straight lines away from the corner triangle.

I find it safest to sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other as I go rather than waiting until I have laid out all the blocks.  That way I can be sure that the blocks are alternating both across the rows and down the columns.

Add row 4

Add row 4

Lay out three of the first block alternating with  two of the second block alternating for the fourth row.  On the left hand end of the row place a red side triangle.

Corner triangle on row 4

Corner triangle on row 4

At the other end of the row place a red corner triangle.  This corner triangle forms the top right hand corner – the next row will start to form the right hand edge of the quilt.

Row five

Row five

Last 4 rows of the London underground quilt

Make row five also with three of the first block alternating with two of the second block.  This time you need to place a red corner triangle at the left hand end of the row.

End of row five

End of row five

On the right hand end of row place a red side triangle.  Note that this time the square corner of the red side triangle is placed against the top of the block beside it.

Row six

Row six

Now the rows of the quilt are reducing in size, forming the bottom right hand section of the quilt.  So row six contains only three quilt blocks with a red side triangle at each end.

Rows 7 and 8

Rows 7 and 8

Rows seven and eight are very similar to the first two rows.  For row seven you need one single block with a side triangle at each end.  Row eight is the final corner triangle.

If you haven’t been doing this as you go along, sew the blocks and triangles together across the rows and then sew the rows to each other.

Use blue for the border

Use blue for the border

Add the quilt border

As there are so many triangles along the edges of the London Underground quilt there’s quite a danger of the fabric stretching a little.  So it’s a good idea to add the border as soon as possible.  I’ve used 2.1/2″ strips of blue fabric.  Do measure your own quilt, but for my quilt I used two lengths of 59.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 83.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the London Underground quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

View from Frankley Beeches

View from Frankley Beeches

Although I have lived in Birmingham for a few years now, I am constantly coming across places that are completely new to me.  Last week I was told about a place called Frankley Beeches, just a few miles from here.

At the very top of the hill there’s a small area of beech trees and the view from there is stunning.  You can see down the fields to Frankley Reservoir with Brimingham spread out behind it.  The wood is run by the National Trust.  Apparently on a good day you can see right across to the Berwyn Range in Wales, 70 miles away.  I was also told that the next point to the east as high as Frankley Beeches is in the Ural Mountains in Russia!

Sock Pattern Quilt

Sock pattern quilt

Sock pattern quilt

Don’t laugh, but the sock pattern quilt this week comes to you courtesy of a pair of socks that I fell in love with earlier this week.  I’ve made the quilt a little larger than the socks (74″ by 51″) but it’s one of those quilts that you can make smaller or larger fairly easily.  It’s made in rows using quilt blocks of different sizes from row to row, but they are always the same size within a row.

It reminds me slightly of the Arran sweaters that my mother used to knit for my father when I was a child – although in totally different colours.




Quilt with socks

Quilt with socks

I’ve used 1/2 yard each of the blue, pink and purple batik fabrics with 3/4 yard of white and 2.3/4 yards of black fabric.  I did wonder whether to use a solid black, but now that the quilt is finished I am glad that I used a patterned black.  I think that it softens the design.  As usual, you can buy these fabrics at a reduced price in this week’s special offer.

Completed blocks for the sock pattern quilt

Completed blocks for the sock pattern quilt

Cutting requirements for the sock pattern quilt

I have listed the 2.1/2″ squares here, but in fact I saved time by cutting rectangles as I made the blocks:  a 4.1/2″ strip for two squares, a 6.1/2″ strip for three squares, an 8.1/2″ strip for four squares.

Blue block:  one hundred and twelve black 2.1/2″ squares, thirty two blue 2.1/2″ squares, twenty four each 2.7/8″ squares in both blue and black

Pink block:  one hundred and ninety two 2.1/2″ black squares, sisty four 2.1/2″ squares

Purple block:  forty eight 2.1/2″ squares in both black and purple, sixteen 2.7/8″ squares in both black and purple

For the sashing you will need five 1.1/2″ strips of white 64.1/2″ long

For the black borders you will need in 2.1/2″ lengths of black:  two @64.1/2″, two @ 45.1/2″, two @ 70.1/2″ and two @ 51.1/2″ long

For the white border you will need in 1.1/2″ strips of white:  two@ 68.1/2″, two at 47.1/2″ long

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Sock pattern quilt – the blue blocks

Make half square triangle units using the 2.7/8″ squares:  place a black square and a blue square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will give you two half square triangle units which are now 2.1/2″ squares.  You will also need to make these for the purple block.

Blue block layout

Blue block layout

Lay the squares out in six rows.  As I mentioned above, instead of using squares all the time, I have used a 16.1/2″ black strip at the top and bottom, 4.1/2″ black strips in the second and fifth rows and 4.1/2″ blue strips in the second and fifth rows.  This saves time when you’re sewing everything together.  Take care with the half square triangles to be sure that you have them correctly placed.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block. The block measures 16.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ now and you need to make four of these.

Pink block layout

Pink block layout

Sock pattern quilt – the pink blocks

This is a very quick block to make.  In the first row I’ve used 6.1/2″ black strips with a 4.1/2″ pink strip.  In the second row I’ve used three 4.1/2″ black strips.  In the third row I’ve used an 8.1/2″ black strip and in the fourth row I’ve used a 12.1/2″ black strip.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows together to complete the block.  The block measures 16.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ and you need to make eight of these.

Purple block layout

Purple block layout

Sock pattern quilt – the purple blocks

Make half square triangle units as above with all the 2.7/8″ squares.

In the first row I have used a 12.1/2″ purple strip.  In the second row I have used an 8.1/2″ black strip.  In the third row I’ve used 4.1/2″ strips of both black and purple and in the fourth row I’ve used 6.1/2″ black strips.  There are two half square triangles in each row, placed so that the purple forms a large triangle, with a smaller black triangle on either side.

The block measures 16.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ and you will need to make four of these.

Sew sashing between the rows

Sew sashing between the rows

Assembling the sock pattern quilt

Sew the blocks together in rows of four – one row of four blue blocks, one row of four purple blocks and two rows of four pink blocks.

Sew the rows together using the 1.1/2″ white sashing strips.  Begin with a sashing strip, then a pink row with the triangles pointing up, then a sashing strip then the blue row then another sashing strip.

Final rows of the sock pattern quilt

Final rows of the sock pattern quilt

Continue with the purple row (triangles pointing down), then another sashing strip, the final pink row (triangles pointing down) and a final sashing strip – you should have used five sashing strips.

Sock pattern quilt borders

Sock pattern quilt borders

Sock pattern quilt borders

I’ve used three borders for this quilt.  The first border is made with 2.1/2″ black strips, the second with 1.1/2″ white strips and for the third border I returned to the 2.1/2″ black strips.  The lengths are given above in the cutting requirements.

That completes the sock pattern quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  You can find full details of these steps in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

An astonishing but heart warming thing happened last week.  A lady bought my window cat quilt and then asked me not to send it to her but instead to donate it to a child who would enjoy it.  Thank you, Gema – you are a kind and generous lady.

Craftsy

Pinwheel Squares Quilt Pattern


Pinwheel squares quilt pattern

Pinwheel squares quilt pattern

The pinwheel squares quilt pattern is another of those optical illusion quilts where the squares appear to lie behind the pinwheels.  It’s another Fabric Freedom pattern using their lovely Blossom fabric range.  I’ve made two versions of the pinwheel block – one dark and one light.  The quilt measures 43″ square and of course you could make it any size by just adding more blocks to either the width or the length.

I have used 3/4 yard of dark fabric (grey), 1/2 yard of light fabric (white floral).  I have used two medium fabrics:  3/4 yard of pink and 3/4 yard of green.  For the border I have used 1/2 yard of a different green from the same range of fabric.

The Blossom fabrics come in three different colour ranges, so I am offering this week’s special offer (all the fabrics for this quilt top at a 10% discount) in three variations:  pink, blue or red.  Click on this week’s special offer for details.

Cutting requirements for the pinwheel squares quilt pattern

4.7/8″ squares:  twenty six grey and twenty four white floral

2.7/8″ strips cut across the width of fabric:  seven strips each of pink and green

For the border you will need five 2″ strips of the second green cut across the width of fabric

Sew together strips of pink and green

Sew together strips of pink and green

How to make pinwheel squares quilt block 1

Cut the 4.7/8″ grey squares along one diagonal to make two triangles from each square.

Sew together strips of pink and green along the length.  Press and then cut these panels at 4.7/8″ intervals to make squares.

 

Cut the squares along one diagonal

Cut the squares along one diagonal

Place these squares so that the pink fabric is below the green fabric and cut along the diagonal that goes from bottom right to top left.  You will need the left hand triangle for quilt block 1 and the other triangle for quilt block 2.

Pinwheel squares quilt block 1 layout

Pinwheel squares quilt block 1 layout

 

Place four of the grey triangles with four pink/green triangles to make a pinwheel.  Note that the pink part of the triangle is placed outermost so that they appear to form a square frame behind the grey.  The green triangles form a small pinwheel in the middle – or a small green square behind the grey depending on how you look at it.

 

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block 1

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block 1

Sew the triangles together in pairs to make squares.  Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other to create pinwheel  block 1.  Make thirteen of these.

 

Pinwheel squares quilt block 2 layout

Pinwheel squares quilt block 2 layout

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block2

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block 2

How to make pinwheel squares quilt block 2

The light pinwheel block is made in the same way but with the other triangles made from the green/pink squares and using white instead of grey triangles.

Note that the pink/green triangles are placed so that the green is outermost and the pink forms the small pinwheel in the middle.

Make twelve of the pinwheel squares blocks in these colours.

 

Alternate the blocks across the rows

Alternate the blocks across the rows

Assembling the pinwheel squares quilt

Sew the blocks together in five rows of five.  Rows one, three and five begin with the dark quilt block 1 and then alternate blocks 1 and 2 across the rows.  Row two and four begin with the light quilt block 2 and then alternate the blocks across the rows.

 

Pinwheel squares quilt border

Pinwheel squares quilt border

Pinwheel squares quilt border

For the border I have used 2″ strips of a different green fabric.  This will give a 1.1/2″ finished size border.

You will need two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 43.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the top of the pinwheel squares quilt pattern.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Last weekend I went to a really interesting workshop with Kimmy Brunner which gave me lots of lovely ideas for future quilts.  This weekend is going to be spent very quietly getting ready for my holiday – so many things that I had intended to make to take with me, but I just don’t think that I’ll have the time.

 

Butterfly Medallion Quilt


Butterfly medallion quilt

Butterfly medallion quilt

The butterfly medallion quilt is a great way to show off a range of fabrics.  In this case I have used the complete range of Butterfly Meadow from Fabric Freedom and this is their pattern for that range.  It measures 40″ by 46″ and I have used 3/4 yard each of the central floral fabric and the small print and white for the flying geese, with 1/2 yard each of the other three fabrics.  You can buy these fabrics at 10% discount in this week’s special offer.

Cutting requirements for the butterfly medallion quilt

Central panel:  18.1/2″ by 24.1/2″

First frame:  two strips 2.1/2″ by 24.1/2″, two strips 2.1/2″ by 22.1/2″

Second frame:  fifty eight floral rectangles 4.7/8″ by 2.7/8″, one hundred and sixteen 2.7/8″ white squares

Third frame:  four 3.1/2″ wide strips of butterfly fabric 36.1/2″ long

Final frame/border:  two 2.1/2″ gold strips 40.1/2″ long, two 2.1/2″ gold strips 42.1/2″ long

How to make flying geese units

How to make flying geese units

Making the flying geese units

Don’t be worried about making the flying geese – they are really very simple.  Place a floral rectangle right side up.  Place a white square on one side of the rectangle with right side down.  Sew a seam along the diagonal. Trim the excess fabric about 1/4″ above the seam and discard the two triangles.  Flip the remaining white triangle up so that it completes the rectangle and press.

Place another white square right side down on the other side of the rectangle.  It will overlap the first white triangle.  Sew a seam along the diagonal again.  Make sure that it’s the correct diagonal so that your two seams meet in the top middle of the rectangle.  Trim the excess triangles 1/4″ from the seam again and press the remaining white triangle up so that it completes the rectangle.

Make four cornerstones

Make four cornerstones

Make fifty eight of these.  Most of them will be sewn together in rows to make the second frame for the butterfly medallion quilt, but take four pairs of the flying geese and sew them together to make diamond in a square blocks.  These will be the cornerstones.  They will need trimming to make them 4.1/2″ squares.

Each individual flying geese unit should be trimmed to 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″.

Assembling the butterfly medallion quilt

Sew the first frame to the panel

Sew the first frame to the panel

This quilt is made by working out from the middle.  Place the floral panel down first and sew the two 24.1/2″ lengths of trellis fabric to the sides.  Then sew the 22.1/2″ lengths to the top and bottom.

Sew the flying geese units to the sides

Sew the flying geese units to the sides

Sew the flying geese units together in two lengths of fourteen units and two lengths of eleven units.

Sew a fourteen unit length to each side of the quilt.  Note that the triangles need to point upwards on the left hand side of the quilt but downwards on the right hand side of the quilt.

This will give you a complete frame of flying geese following each other clockwise around the quilt.

Make sure that the flying geese follow each other

Make sure that the flying geese follow each other

Sew one cornerstone to each end of both of the eleven unit lengths.  Sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.  On the top of the butterfly medallion quilt the triangles should be pointing from left to right while on the bottom of the quilt they will be pointing from right to left.

Third frame of the medallion quilt

Third frame of the medallion quilt

The next frame is completely straightforward.  Sew one length of the butterfly fabric to each side of the quilt and then sew one to the top and one to the bottom.  I had to check my measurements on this because I felt that all these strips should not be the same size, but in fact it works as long as you sew the sides first.

Border for the butterfly medallion quilt

Border for the butterfly medallion quilt

Quilt border

I’m not sure whether the final frame counts as a frame or a border, but sew a 42.1/2″ length of the gold fabric to the sides and a 40.1/2″ length to the top and bottom of the quilt.

You’ll have noticed that for this quilt I have always added the sides first and then the top and bottom.  This is unusual for me – usually I add the top and bottom first.  In fact, they are both perfectly acceptable methods – the important point is to be consistent.  Adding the sides first is known as ‘long horizontal’ while adding the top and bottom first is known as ‘long vertical’ – just in case you are interested!

The back of the butterfly medallion quilt

The back of the butterfly medallion quilt

That completes the butterfly medallion quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding. You can find full details of these steps towards the bottom of the quilting for beginners section.

You’ll be astonished to hear that Minnie and I have actually completed this medallion quilt.  The quilting shows up better on the back than on the front.  What I did was stitch in the ditch around each frame and then added a few lines of a flower design.

Here’s the video:


Craftsy