Windblown Square Quilt Pattern

Windblown square quilt

Windblown square quilt

For the Windblown Square quilt I decided to use simple four patch quilt blocks.  I chose three blocks which all have a white diamond forming in the middle of the block.  Obviously one of them was the windblown square quilt block.  Altogether I used three different blocks plus a simple half square triangle for the corners of the quilt.

The quilt measures 64″ square, using sixteen blocks which are all 12″ square finished size.  The fabric required was 2.3/4 yards of white, 1.1/2 yards of red, 3/4 yard of blue and 1/2 yard of gold.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the windblown square quilt

12.7/8″ squares:  two red, two white

3.7/8″ squares:  sixty eight blue, thirty two red, thirty two gold, one hundred and thirty two white

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty six white

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  eighteen white

For the border you will need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips of red across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a white square right sides together with either a red, blue or gold square and mark a line along the diagonal.

Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangles which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the coloured fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Flywheel quilt block layout

Flywheel quilt block layout

Make the flywheel quilt block

This is a delightful block that reminds me of a laurel wreath.  Lay the squares out in four rows of four.

Place a white rectangle at the beginning of row one and the end of row four. Add four blue/white half squares in the middle, placing them so that the white triangles form a white diamond.  Lay a white square in the top right and bottom left corners.  Add a half square triangle on each edge of the block to form a stripe with the blue triangles from the central area.  That just leaves you with two spaces for a white square at the end of row two and the beginning of row three.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make nine of them.

Windblown square quilt block layout

Windblown square quilt block layout

Make the windblown square quilt block

This block is made entirely with half square triangle units.  Lay the squares out in four rows of four again.  Begin by placing four gold/white half square triangles in the middle, forming a white diamond in the centre of the block.

Along each edge place two blue/white half square triangles to form a larger blue triangle pointing inwards.  Alongside these place a blue/white and a gold/white half square triangle to form a larger white triangle, also pointing inwards.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

The block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make eight of them.

Broken dishes quilt block layout

Broken dishes quilt block layout

Make the broken dishes quilt block

The third block is made entirely with red/white half square triangle units.  Begin with four half square triangles in the middle forming a white diamond surrounded by red.

Along each edge place two pairs of half square triangles, each pair facing a different way from the other pair.  To check the correct placement, look out for a white corner to the block and a larger red triangle pointing outwards on each edge.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  At this stage the block measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Make the corner blocks

Make the corner blocks

Make the corner blocks

This block is simplicity itself.  Cut the 12.7/8″ squares along one diagonal to make two triangles.  Sew a red and a white triangle together to form a square again.

The block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make four of them.

I chose this design for the corners so that they would blend with the border and give a circular feel to the quilt design.

First two rows

First two rows

Assemble the windblown square quilt

Sew the blocks together in five rows of five.  Row one begins and ends with a corner block.  Between these place blue, gold and then blue blocks.

Begin and end row two with gold blocks.  In the middle place blue, red, blue blocks.

Row three

Row three

For row three, the central row, place a blue block at each end.  Between these place red, blue, red blocks.

Rows 4 and 5

Rows 4 and 5

The final two rows are similar to the first two rows.

Make row four with gold, blue, red, blue, gold blocks.  This is exactly the same as row two.

In row five you need two corner blocks at the ends with gold, blue, gold blocks in the middle.  This is the same as row one but with the corner blocks placed so that the red triangles form the bottom two corners of the quilt.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the windblown square quilt border

Use 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric for the border.  You will need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 64.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the windblown square quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Dragon sand sculpture

Dragon sand sculpture

Last week I paid a flying visit to Fuerteventura in the Canary Islands.  It was wonderful to feel the warmth of the sun after all the snow that we seem to have had in Birmingham this winter.  I haven’t managed to sort through my photos yet so I’ll show them to you next week.  I have managed to find the sand sculpture photos, though.  The men making these were so clever – they worked really quickly to make the most wonderful designs.

It hasn’t shown up in the photo, but this dragon had smoke coming out of his nostrils.

Trees and volcanoes

Trees and volcanoes

A similar technique must have been used to produce smoke coming out of the volcanoes at the back of this sculpture.  The trees at the front fascinated me.  It certainly beats any sand castle that I made with the children when they were young!