Florence Floor Tile Quilt Pattern One

 

Florence floor tile quilt one

Florence floor tile quilt one

This is my first Florence floor tile quilt pattern – probably one of many to come.  I have chosen a very simple geometric design from the tiles in the Florence Cathedral – partly because I didn’t have much time, but also because it’s such an eyecatching design.  I added the red cross in the middle just to give the quilt some pop, and because the design came from a cathedral.

The original floor tiles

The original floor tiles

The quilt measures 38″ square and I used 1 yard of green fabric, 3/4 yard of light fabric with just five 2.1/2″ red squares.  Many of the buildings in Florence use white marble from Carrara, green from Prato and a lovely rose colour from Siena.  The fabrics I have used have a marbled effect, but as you can see the light fabric is not white – I thought that a solid white might look too stark in the quilt.  The red that I have used is also much darker than the marble used in Florence.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.

Cutting requirements for the Florence floor tile quilt one

6.1/2″ squares:  four light

2.1/2″ squares:  sixteen green, five red

2.1/2″ light rectangles:  sixteen 4.1/2″, sixteen 6.1/2″, four 16.1/2″ for the sashing

2.1/2″ green rectangles:  eight 6.1/2″, eight 10.1/2″, eight 14.1/2, eight 18.1/2″

Add green strips around the central square

Add green strips around the central square

Making the Florence floor tile quilt one

Each block is built up from the middle, beginning with the light 6.1/2″ square.  Sew a green 4.1/2″ rectangle to the top and bottom of the square.  Press the seam allowances away from the square, then sew the 10.1/2″ rectangles to the sides.

The second frame is light fabric

The second frame is light fabric

The next frame is made using the light fabric, but with a green square in each side to link the inner and outer green frames.

The strips across the top and bottom are made using two 4.1/2″ light rectangles with a green square between them.  Sew these to the square.  The side strips are made using two 6.1/2″ light rectangles with a green square between them.  Continue pressing the seam allowances away from the central square.

Add the outer green frame

Add the outer green frame

Finally add the outer green frame to the quilt block.  That’s a 14.1/2″ rectangle across the top and bottom and an 18.1/2″ rectangle down each side.

You will need to make four of these quilt blocks.

Assembling the Florence floor tile quilt

Make the quilt sashing

Make the quilt sashing

Sew a red square to one end of each of the 16.1/2″ light rectangles.  This will form the sashing between the blocks.

Sew the blocks together in pairs with a sashing strip between each pair.

Make the central sashing strip

Make the central sashing strip

The sashing strip to join the two pairs of blocks together is made using the remaining two sashing strips with an additional red square between them.  Place the pairs of blocks so that the red square of the sashing will be in the middle of the quilt and then sew them to either side of the central sashing strip.

Pin from the middle outwards

Pin from the middle outwards

In order to make sure that the red cross forms correctly, it’s best to pin the red squares in place first and then pin outwards towards the sides.

That completes the Florence floor tile quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

If you want to see some more of my thoughts from Florence, click here.

 

Craftsy

Florence Quilt Design Ideas

Sunset over the River Arno

Sunset over the River Arno

My Florence quilt design ideas will keep me going for many months!  My trip to Florence was a wonderful break – what a beautiful city it is!  I walked miles every day but I could go back tomorrow and visit a whole new set of museums, palaces and churches that I didn’t have time to see this time.  I didn’t take photos of statues like David because there are so many images around, probably all of them better quality than anything that I could take.

Instead I’ll try and give you my over view of Florence from a quilter’s point of view.  Florence is set on the River Arno and the sunsets were beautiful while I was there.  The trouble I always find with sunset photos is that by definition it’s getting dark when you take the photo, so there’s no clarity – just an overall beauty.

Church of Santa Maria Novella

Church of Santa Maria Novella

Florence chocolate festival

Nothing to do with florence quilt design ideas, but I thought that you might like to see this image of the Piazza del Santa Maria Novella.  In the background you can see the delightful church and museum.  This was the first building that I toured because it was straight in front of me when the bus dropped me at the station.  The important point is that every one of those tent shapes in front of the church was selling hand made chocolate – I had just happened to arrive during a chocolate festival.

The Cathedral

Cathedrale de Santa maria del fiore

Cathedrale de Santa Maria del Fiore

My first real source of Florence quilt design ideas came from the Cathedral.  Oh my!  Many of the buildings have marble facades – white Carrara, green Prato or rose coloured Siena marbles.  The geometric designs made in the marble with just these colours were quite marvellous – and a great inspiration.

More complex tile patterns

More complex tile patterns

Strange play mates

Strange play mates

Some of the designs were simplicity itself – like the design you’ll see in tomorrow’s quilt pattern – and some were enormously complex.  I could have spent a whole day in the cathedral, but there were so many other places that I wanted to visit.

As I wandered the streets towards my next destination, I saw these two delightful boys in a shop window.  What a wonderful contrast – the one very bright and modern sitting beside a very traditional marble statue.  I loved it as a display – really eye catching.

On the Ponte Vecchio

On the Ponte Vecchio

To get to my next stop I had to cross the Ponte Vecchio (the old bridge) which was the only one to survive the war.  The buildings that you can see are all on the bridge itself.  At street level the shops are all goldsmiths and jewellery shops.  On the top on the left is something called the Vasari Corridor which is a corridor running from one palace to another.  It’s not open to the general public, but I was able to see it by joining a group.  Nearly a kilometre of corridor with beautiful paintings on both walls all the way long.

But my main reason for crossing the Vecchio Bridge was to see the Artisan Section which is just over the bridge and turn right on to the Borgo San Jacopo.  What a delightful section of shops and workshops.  There were plenty of textiles on display, but they were more furnishing and lace rather than quilting fabrics.  I saw some Italian fabric for sale which was truly beautiful – but it was E130 per metre (that’s about $130), so I decided that I could live without it after all!

Cucilandia and Filomania quilt shop

Cucilandia and Filomania quilt shop

Florence quilt shop

I did manage to find a Florence quilt shop.  Naturally you’ll understand that this was purely in the interests of research, not because I’m a manic obsessive who has to root out quilt shops wherever I go!  I was hoping to find some Italian quilt fabric, but they only stocked American fabrics that I was already familiar with.

If you wish to go there, it’s at 180/182 Viale Europa.  It cost me E15 to get there by taxi and E1.50 to return by bus.  I didn’t take the bus to get there because I thought that I wouldn’t know when to get off and might end up somewhere totally different.

Leaning tower of Pisa

Leaning tower of Pisa

Pisa Cathedral

I nearly forgot to mention that I managed a visit to Pisa as well.  That might be a good one for an applique quilt.  The real source of quilt design ideas from there, though, was again the cathedral – the floor tiles were beautifully laid out.

Florence quilt design ideas

I had always wanted to visit Florence and I enjoyed every minute of my time there.  My Florence quilt design ideas are going to keep popping up in the Friday quilt patterns for some time yet, so I hope that you don’t get bored with them!

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose