Curved Log Cabin Quilt Pattern

Curved log cabin quilt

Curved log cabin quilt

My curved log cabin quilt pattern has turned out really well – well I think so, anyway!  I’ve used the basic log cabin quilt block but with different sized logs.  This means that the red square which began in the middle of the block actually ends up way off centre.  Traditionally, the central square of a log cabin block is red to represent the fire in the hearth of a log cabin.  The colours move from dark to light on each side and I have added the logs clockwise rather than anti clockwise.  The quilt measures 60″ square.

I made sixteen identical blocks and created the design by rotating the blocks.  Each block is 14″ square finished size and I used 1 yard of red, 3/4 yard each of the two darkest blues and darkest light fabrics, with 1/2 yard each of the two lightest blues and the third lightest light fabric, and just 1/4 yard of white fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements

The red squares in the middle are 2.1/2″.  The blue logs are 2.1/2″ wide while the light logs are 1.1/2″ wide.  I made the border with 2.1/2″ red strips.  I haven’t listed the log sizes here because it would take me half a page to do that and also because you may prefer to speed piece the logs – details below.

Cut the central square

Cut the central square

Central square

Sew together 2.1/2″ strips of red and the lightest blue along the length.  Cut this panel at 2.1/2″ intervals to give rectangles 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″.  These will form the central red square and the first blue log of the block.

You need to make sixteen of these.

First round of logs

Add the second log

Add the second log

For the next blue log you could cut a 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ blue rectangle and sew it to the left hand side of the red square.

Speed piecing

Speed piecing

Alternatively, if you wish to save time with speed piecing, you can cut a 2.1/2″ strip and sew the blue/red rectangles to it.  Place the rectangle on the blue strip.  Make sure that the red square is above the blue square and keep adding more blue/red rectangles until you have sixteen – for this you will need more than one blue strip.

Cut the strip between the rectangles

Cut the strip between the rectangles

Cut the blue strip between each pair of rectangles.  I find this speed piecing much quicker than cutting each log individually before sewing it.  If you are unclear of how I’ve done this, you may find the video helpful – link at the bottom of the page.

Add the first white log

Add the first white log

I’ve made the next two logs of this frame using 1.1/2″ strips of white fabric.  You need a 4.1/2″ rectangle across the top.  This is shown on the right of the photo.  If you’re speed piecing then place the white strip and the block as shown on the left of the photo.

Second white log

Second white log

Add a 5.1/2″ white strip down the right hand side of the block, shown on the right of the photo.  If you’re speed piecing, place the blocks on the white strip as shown on the left of the photo.  This completes the first round of logs around the central square.

First log, second round

First log, second round

Second round of logs

For this round you need the next darkest blue and light fabrics.  The blues are always 2.1/2″ wide and the lights are always 1.1/2″ wide so I’ll just specify the lengths of the logs from now on.  Add a 5.1/2″ blue strip across the bottom of the block.  Place the block against the blue strip as shown on the left if you are speed piecing.

Second log, second round

Second log, second round

For the second log sew a 7.1/2″ blue rectangle to the left hand side of the block.

The speed piecing option is shown on the left of the photo.

Third log, second round

Third log, second round

For the next log sew a 7.1/2″ light rectangle to the top of the block.  Speed piecing option shown on the left.

Fourth log, second round

Fourth log, second round

Make the final log of this round using an 8.1/2″ light rectangle down the right hand side of the block.

For speed piecing place the block as shown against the light strip.

First log, third round

First log, third round

Third round of logs

Add an 8.1/2″ strip of the next darkest blue across the bottom of the block.  Place the block as shown for speed piecing.

Second log, third round

Second log, third round

Now add a 10.1/2″ blue strip up the left hand side of the curved log cabin quilt block.

Speed piecing shown on the left of the photo.

Third log, third round

Third log, third round

Use the third darkest light fabric for the next two logs.  Add a 10.1/2″ strip across the top of the block.

Fourth log, third round

Fourth log, third round

Now sew an 11.1/2″ rectangle down the right hand side of the block.

Speed piecing layout shown on the left of the photo.  That completes the third round of logs – just one more round to go now!

First log, fourth round

First log, fourth round

Fourth round of logs

Using the darkest blue (I’ve used purple) place an 11.1/2″ strip across the bottom of the block.

Second log, fourth round

Second log, fourth round

Sew a 13.1/2″ rectangle up the left hand side of the block.

Placement of the block for speed piecing shown on the left.

Third log, fourth round

Third log, fourth round

Using the darkest of the light fabrics (I’ve used yellow), sew a 13.1/2″ strip across the top of the block.  For some reason I seem to have taken the photo when the block was upside down, so please take care when placing this strip.

Fourth log, fourth round

Fourth log, fourth round

For the final log of this curved log cabin quilt block, sew a 14.1/2″ strip down the right hand side.  This time the block is the right way up!  The block should now measure 14.1/2″ square and you need to make sixteen of them.

First two rows of blocks

First two rows of blocks

Assemble the curved log cabin quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  I think that using the purple corner for reference will be clearest.  Make row one with two pairs of blocks where the purple corner is bottom right, bottom left, bottom right again and then bottom left.

In row two place the purple corners top left, bottom right, bottom left and then top right.

Rows three and four

Rows three and four

Row three is similar to row two.  Place the purple corners bottom left, top right, top left and bottom right.

In row four the purple corners are top right, top left, top right and top left.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

Add the border

I have picked out the red of the central squares for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 56.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the curved log cabin quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Warwick Castle

Warwick Castle

Recently I visited somewhere that has been on my list for a long time – Warwick Castle.  It is relatively close to where I live and to see my photos you can click on the photo or click here.

Tomorrow I have a stall at Moseley Art Market – I hope that it’s not going to be as cold as they are forecasting!