Cedars of Lebanon Quilt

Cedars of Lebanon quilt

Cedars of Lebanon quilt

I’ve made the Cedars of Lebanon quilt using two different blocks that I think make for quite an interesting quilt – but then I would say that, wouldn’t I!  I’ve used nine quilt blocks, all 18″ square finished size and the quilt measures 60″ square, using 2 yards of dark blue, 1.1/4 yards of turquoise and 1 yard of white fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.

Cutting requirements for the Cedars of Lebanon quilt

3,1.2″ squares:  fifty eight white, eighty eight dark blue, forty eight turquoise

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty five dark blue, twenty five white

6.1/2″ squares:  twenty turquoise

For the border you need to cut and piece 3.1/2″ strips of dark blue:  two 54.1/2″ long and two 60.1/2″ long




Cedars of Lebanon quilt block

Cedars of Lebanon quilt block

Making the cedars of lebanon quilt block

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles with the 3.7/8″ squares.  Place a blue and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Cedars of Lebanon quilt block layout

Cedars of Lebanon quilt block layout

Lay the squares out as shown.  Think of it as a collection of four patch units.  The central 4 patch unit is made with two white squares and two half square triangles.  These are placed so that the white is at the middle and the blue in the corners of the unit.

The corner 4 patch units are made with two dark blue squares and two half square triangles.  These are placed so that there is a dark blue triangle in the corner.  The blue triangles on either side of it combine to form a larger blue triangle across the corner.

The remaining spaces are filled with four 6.1/2″ turquoise squares.

Sew the squares together within each 4 patch unit first.  You will then have nine squares all the same size and can sew the squares together across each row.  Sew the rows to each other to complete the cedars of lebanon quilt block.  You need to make five of these.

Completed alternate quilt block

Completed alternate quilt block

Making the alternate quilt block

This is a simple one – just squares.  I began with just turquoise and dark blue squares, but then decided that I wanted some white in the quilt to help the design.  I changed the squares along both diagonals to white.

You could use strip piecing

You could use strip piecing

You may prefer to do some strip piecing to save time making this block.  Sew together 3.1/2″ strips of dark blue and turquoise.  Cut the resulting panel at 3.1/2″ intervals.  This will give you pairs of squares which will speed up the piecing of the block.

Sew the squares together across each row and sew the rows to each other to complete the alternate quilt block.  You need to make four of these.

Row 1

Row 1

Assembling the cedars of Lebanon quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  The first row is made with an alternate block in the middle and a cedars of Lebanon block on either side.  I have rotated the end blocks – if you look at the white shape in the middle of the cedars of Lebanon blocks, you’ll see that in the first block it points to top right, while in the third block it points to top left.  I did this so that these shapes would straddle the corners.

Row 2

Row 2

The second row is made with a cedars of Lebanon block in the middle and an alternate block on either side.

Row 3

Row 3

The third row is made with an alternate block in the middle and a cedars block on either side.  The cedars blocks are again rotated so that the white central shapes straddle the corners.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the blocks to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 3.1/2″ dark blue strips.  This is slightly wider than most of my borders and I was hoping to give the impression of the design floating on a dark blue background.

That completes the Cedars of Lebanon quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

The St Patrick’s day parade in Birmingham took place last Sunday.  It was the first time that I had watched it and it was great fun.   I’ve made a short video of parts of the parade.

 

Craftsy