Butterfly Medallion Quilt


Butterfly medallion quilt

Butterfly medallion quilt

The butterfly medallion quilt is a great way to show off a range of fabrics.  In this case I have used the complete range of Butterfly Meadow from Fabric Freedom and this is their pattern for that range.  It measures 40″ by 46″ and I have used 3/4 yard each of the central floral fabric and the small print and white for the flying geese, with 1/2 yard each of the other three fabrics.  You can buy these fabrics at 10% discount in this week’s special offer.

Cutting requirements for the butterfly medallion quilt

Central panel:  18.1/2″ by 24.1/2″

First frame:  two strips 2.1/2″ by 24.1/2″, two strips 2.1/2″ by 22.1/2″

Second frame:  fifty eight floral rectangles 4.7/8″ by 2.7/8″, one hundred and sixteen 2.7/8″ white squares

Third frame:  four 3.1/2″ wide strips of butterfly fabric 36.1/2″ long

Final frame/border:  two 2.1/2″ gold strips 40.1/2″ long, two 2.1/2″ gold strips 42.1/2″ long

How to make flying geese units

How to make flying geese units

Making the flying geese units

Don’t be worried about making the flying geese – they are really very simple.  Place a floral rectangle right side up.  Place a white square on one side of the rectangle with right side down.  Sew a seam along the diagonal. Trim the excess fabric about 1/4″ above the seam and discard the two triangles.  Flip the remaining white triangle up so that it completes the rectangle and press.

Place another white square right side down on the other side of the rectangle.  It will overlap the first white triangle.  Sew a seam along the diagonal again.  Make sure that it’s the correct diagonal so that your two seams meet in the top middle of the rectangle.  Trim the excess triangles 1/4″ from the seam again and press the remaining white triangle up so that it completes the rectangle.

Make four cornerstones

Make four cornerstones

Make fifty eight of these.  Most of them will be sewn together in rows to make the second frame for the butterfly medallion quilt, but take four pairs of the flying geese and sew them together to make diamond in a square blocks.  These will be the cornerstones.  They will need trimming to make them 4.1/2″ squares.

Each individual flying geese unit should be trimmed to 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″.

Assembling the butterfly medallion quilt

Sew the first frame to the panel

Sew the first frame to the panel

This quilt is made by working out from the middle.  Place the floral panel down first and sew the two 24.1/2″ lengths of trellis fabric to the sides.  Then sew the 22.1/2″ lengths to the top and bottom.

Sew the flying geese units to the sides

Sew the flying geese units to the sides

Sew the flying geese units together in two lengths of fourteen units and two lengths of eleven units.

Sew a fourteen unit length to each side of the quilt.  Note that the triangles need to point upwards on the left hand side of the quilt but downwards on the right hand side of the quilt.

This will give you a complete frame of flying geese following each other clockwise around the quilt.

Make sure that the flying geese follow each other

Make sure that the flying geese follow each other

Sew one cornerstone to each end of both of the eleven unit lengths.  Sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.  On the top of the butterfly medallion quilt the triangles should be pointing from left to right while on the bottom of the quilt they will be pointing from right to left.

Third frame of the medallion quilt

Third frame of the medallion quilt

The next frame is completely straightforward.  Sew one length of the butterfly fabric to each side of the quilt and then sew one to the top and one to the bottom.  I had to check my measurements on this because I felt that all these strips should not be the same size, but in fact it works as long as you sew the sides first.

Border for the butterfly medallion quilt

Border for the butterfly medallion quilt

Quilt border

I’m not sure whether the final frame counts as a frame or a border, but sew a 42.1/2″ length of the gold fabric to the sides and a 40.1/2″ length to the top and bottom of the quilt.

You’ll have noticed that for this quilt I have always added the sides first and then the top and bottom.  This is unusual for me – usually I add the top and bottom first.  In fact, they are both perfectly acceptable methods – the important point is to be consistent.  Adding the sides first is known as ‘long horizontal’ while adding the top and bottom first is known as ‘long vertical’ – just in case you are interested!

The back of the butterfly medallion quilt

The back of the butterfly medallion quilt

That completes the butterfly medallion quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding. You can find full details of these steps towards the bottom of the quilting for beginners section.

You’ll be astonished to hear that Minnie and I have actually completed this medallion quilt.  The quilting shows up better on the back than on the front.  What I did was stitch in the ditch around each frame and then added a few lines of a flower design.

Here’s the video:


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