GEORGIA QUILT PATTERN


Georgia quilt

Georgia quilt


When you make a quilt it is sometimes difficult to know what secondary designs may appear.  Sometimes you can see after just one block what the secondary designs will be.  The Georgia quilt block fall into this category.  It dates from the 1930’s and is a five patch quilt block pattern.  When I made it up the other day I realised that it would make a stunning quilt because all the red edging to the quilt blocks would combine to form circles when there were loads of quilt blocks sewn together.  The Georgia quilt block is simple enough to make and there’s no sashing because that would get in the way of the circles, so it goes together really quickly.

Fabric requirements for the Georgia quilt pattern

The finished size quilt that I have made here is 36″ by 46″.  You will need about 3/4 yard in yellow, grey and white fabrics and 1.1/4 yards of red.

Making the Georgia quilt blocks

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

The entire Georgia quilt block is made with four half square triangle units and squares, which makes it nice and simple.  The half square triangle units are made by placing a 2.7/8″ square of red and yellow fabric with right sides together.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units, each made of a triangle of red and one of yellow.

 

 

Georgia quilt block layout

Georgia quilt block layout

The rest of the quilt block is made using 2.1/2″ squares.  For each block you will need eight white squares, nine red squares and four grey squares along with the four half square triangles.  Notice that the outer layer of patchwork squares is just alternating red and white squares and the half square triangles all have the yellow triangle pointing towards the centre.

 

 

Sew the squares together in pairs

Sew the squares together in pairs

Sew the rows together to complete the Georgia quilt block

Sew the rows together to complete the Georgia quilt block

Sew the squares together in pairs across each row and then sew the rows together.  Take care when sewing the rows together to have the seam allowances facing in different directions to reduce the bulk.

 

 

Sewing the quilt blocks together

Georgia quilt block complete

Georgia quilt block complete

When the Georgia quilt block is complete you can see how the red squares will start to make a great pattern when the quilt blocks are sewn together.  Make twelve quilt blocks, sew them together in pairs the sew the pairs together in fours across each row.  This give you three rows of four quilt blocks.  The quilt top now measures 30″ by 40″.

 

 

Georgia quilt border and cornerstones

Georgia quilt border

Georgia quilt border

For the quilt border I wanted to tie in with the overall design so I sewed together a 2.1/2″ strip each of the red, yellow and white fabrics.  Make four of these strip panels and cut two at 30.1/2″ and two at 40.1/2″.  Sew the 40.1/2″ strips to the two long edges of the quilt top with the red strip nearest the quilt and the white strip on the outside.

 

 

Quilt cornerstones

Quilt cornerstones

Sew the cornerstones to two of the borders

Sew the cornerstones to two of the borders

Make the quilt cornerstones using the basic Georgia quilt block but without the red and white squares round the outside.  For this you need four red squares, sixteen grey squares and sixteen half square triangles.  This makes four cornerstones.  Sew one of these at each end of the 30.1/2″ border strips.  These can now be sewn to the two short edges of the quilt top.

 

Corner of the Georgia quilt

Corner of the Georgia quilt

The Georgia quilt top is now complete and ready for quilting, layering and binding.  I plan on using the grey fabric for the binding and I will use my normal double fold straight binding, but I have been asked for instructions for making continuous bias binding – more details on continuous quilt binding.

 

 

Here’s the video:

 

 

 

 

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Comments

  1. Thanks Rose. I put together a block out of scrap pieces and now I am debating if it is too busy for such a large quilt. I wanted to use it as a bed spread in a get away home. What would be your opinion on this?

    • Hi Bea. I’m not trying to duck out of answering, but it’s impossible to say. You are the one who will live with it, so only you can say if you find it too busy. If you like it, then go for it.

  2. I would like to make Georgia’s quilt, but I want to make it king size. Can I just keep adding more rows of blocks to make it the size I want? And how do I figure how much material to buy? I am a beginner, but I am doing real well and feel I can handle it. Bea

    • Hi Bea. That sounds like a great project. Yes, you can just keep adding more blocks to either the width or the length. To get to king size you would have to use more or less twice as many blocks so you should be safe if you double the fabric quantities.

  3. Rose Parman says:

    Hello, I am a complete beginner at quilting, although I have been dressmaking for quite some time. I love the Georgia quilt pattern and have purchased fabric and cut out all the blocks ready to commence sewing. What I would like to know though, after joining all the blocks together, then the borders, what are the next steps to complete the quilt? I had considered I would stitch in the ditch for this one….. Rose

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