Paper Pinwheel Quilt – Free Pattern

Paper pinwheel quilt

Paper pinwheel quilt

The Paper Pinwheel quilt is made using two versions of the block of the same name.  It was the name of the block that attracted me – the design looks like those paper whirligig things that I can remember from my childhood.  The quilt measures 54″ square and I have used sixteen blocks which are all 12″ square finished size.  I needed 1 yard each of light blue, cream and red fabrics, together with 3/4 yard of red fabric.  The block is a simple four patch and I have used red in the middle and on the border to provide more interest to the quilt.

You can buy the fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the paper pinwheel quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  four red, sixty light blue, sixty four dark blue, sixty four cream

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty two light blue, thirty two cream

For the border you will need to cut five 3.1/2″ strips of red across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a light blue and a cream square with right sides together.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are now 3.1/2″ square and you need to trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Paper pinwheel quilt block layout

Paper pinwheel quilt block layout

Make the basic paper pinwheel quilt block

Lay the squares out in four rows of four.  Begin with four cream squares in the middle.  On each edge of this central section place a half square triangle and a dark blue square.  If you follow the edges of the block in a clockwise direction you’ll see that they always follow the same order – the half square triangle first and then the dark blue square.

In each corner place a light blue square.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make twelve of them.

Alternate quilt block layout

Alternate quilt block layout

Make the alternate block

The alternate block is just as simple as the first one.  All I have done is swap one corner square from light blue to red.

This block also measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Rows one and two

Rows one and two

Assemble the quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  Place four basic blocks in a row for rows one and four.

Rows three and four

Rows three and four

Use the alternate blocks in rows two and three.  Make row two with a basic block at each end and two alternate blocks in the middle.  Place these so that the red squares are together and at the bottom of the row.

For row three you need a basic block at each end and two alternate blocks in the middle.  This time place them so that the red squares are together and at the top of the row.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Red for the border

Red for the border

Add the quilt border

I have used 3.1/2″ strips of red for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the paper pinwheel quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

I want to apologise to all those of you who have tried to email me or leave comments on the website.  I have upgraded the website so that it has security clearance – the beginning of the address is now https rather than just http.  However this seems to have meant that a lot of my links don’t work – even though I was told that it was a really simple operation!  Please believe me – I am not ignoring your comments and emails – I’m just not receiving them.  I have spent many hours this week on the phone with technical support teams and if it hasn’t been fixed when you see this quilt pattern I sincerely hope that it will be sorted out really soon.

In the meantime I hope you have a wonderful Easter weekend.

Pinwheel Squares Quilt Pattern


Pinwheel squares quilt pattern

Pinwheel squares quilt pattern

The pinwheel squares quilt pattern is another of those optical illusion quilts where the squares appear to lie behind the pinwheels.  It’s another Fabric Freedom pattern using their lovely Blossom fabric range.  I’ve made two versions of the pinwheel block – one dark and one light.  The quilt measures 43″ square and of course you could make it any size by just adding more blocks to either the width or the length.

I have used 3/4 yard of dark fabric (grey), 1/2 yard of light fabric (white floral).  I have used two medium fabrics:  3/4 yard of pink and 3/4 yard of green.  For the border I have used 1/2 yard of a different green from the same range of fabric.

The Blossom fabrics come in three different colour ranges, so I am offering this week’s special offer (all the fabrics for this quilt top at a 10% discount) in three variations:  pink, blue or red.  Click on this week’s special offer for details.

Cutting requirements for the pinwheel squares quilt pattern

4.7/8″ squares:  twenty six grey and twenty four white floral

2.7/8″ strips cut across the width of fabric:  seven strips each of pink and green

For the border you will need five 2″ strips of the second green cut across the width of fabric

Sew together strips of pink and green

Sew together strips of pink and green

How to make pinwheel squares quilt block 1

Cut the 4.7/8″ grey squares along one diagonal to make two triangles from each square.

Sew together strips of pink and green along the length.  Press and then cut these panels at 4.7/8″ intervals to make squares.

 

Cut the squares along one diagonal

Cut the squares along one diagonal

Place these squares so that the pink fabric is below the green fabric and cut along the diagonal that goes from bottom right to top left.  You will need the left hand triangle for quilt block 1 and the other triangle for quilt block 2.

Pinwheel squares quilt block 1 layout

Pinwheel squares quilt block 1 layout

 

Place four of the grey triangles with four pink/green triangles to make a pinwheel.  Note that the pink part of the triangle is placed outermost so that they appear to form a square frame behind the grey.  The green triangles form a small pinwheel in the middle – or a small green square behind the grey depending on how you look at it.

 

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block 1

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block 1

Sew the triangles together in pairs to make squares.  Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other to create pinwheel  block 1.  Make thirteen of these.

 

Pinwheel squares quilt block 2 layout

Pinwheel squares quilt block 2 layout

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block2

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block 2

How to make pinwheel squares quilt block 2

The light pinwheel block is made in the same way but with the other triangles made from the green/pink squares and using white instead of grey triangles.

Note that the pink/green triangles are placed so that the green is outermost and the pink forms the small pinwheel in the middle.

Make twelve of the pinwheel squares blocks in these colours.

 

Alternate the blocks across the rows

Alternate the blocks across the rows

Assembling the pinwheel squares quilt

Sew the blocks together in five rows of five.  Rows one, three and five begin with the dark quilt block 1 and then alternate blocks 1 and 2 across the rows.  Row two and four begin with the light quilt block 2 and then alternate the blocks across the rows.

 

Pinwheel squares quilt border

Pinwheel squares quilt border

Pinwheel squares quilt border

For the border I have used 2″ strips of a different green fabric.  This will give a 1.1/2″ finished size border.

You will need two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 43.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the top of the pinwheel squares quilt pattern.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Last weekend I went to a really interesting workshop with Kimmy Brunner which gave me lots of lovely ideas for future quilts.  This weekend is going to be spent very quietly getting ready for my holiday – so many things that I had intended to make to take with me, but I just don’t think that I’ll have the time.

 

Cross Hatch Quilting


 

Cross hatch quilting

Cross hatch quilting

Cross hatch quilting is my next choice for the machine quilting sampler.  This is a simple but very effective filler quilting design and is still a straight line quilting pattern.  You can see my previous post on straight line quilting here.

Mark the lines first

Mark the lines first

Mark the lines for cross hatch quilting

As I did for the first block of straight line quilting, I began by stitching around the block to stabilise the area.  For cross hatch quilting it usually helps to mark the lines first although you may feel confident enough to use the width of your sewing foot as a guide for sewing the lines.

I marked the line across the diagonal first and then marked all the lines 1/2″ away working on one side of the diagonal.  Then I moved the ruler and filled in the cross hatch quilting lines on the other side of the diagonal.

When you have finished the lines in one direction, draw a line along the other diagonal and repeat the process.

How to do basic cross hatch quilting

The cross hatch quilting lines are stitched in a similar way – sew all the lines in one direction first and then sew them all in the other direction.  That way you will have less chance of missing a line or of ending up needing to sew lines a distance from each other.  I began in the top right corner and sewed that first small line then stitched along the block outline to get to the next line.  By being methodical you also end up sewing each line in the opposite direction to the one before.  This helps to keep the block overall straight.  When you have finished quilting in one direction, then you can sew all the lines in the opposite direction.

How to do raised square cross hatch quilting

Basic cross hatch quilting

Basic cross hatch quilting

Raised square cross hatch quilting

Raised square cross hatch quilting

On the left you can see a completed section of basic cross hatch quilting.  On the right the top half of the block seems to have every other square raised.  This is an illusion.  What I have actually done is flattened alternate squares using very dense quilting (technical term microstippling!).  This makes the unquilted squares appear to be raised up by comparison.

It obviously takes a lot longer to add in this microstippling, but it really does look lovely if you want a particular section of quilting to really stand out.  If I had used a thicker wadding, then the effect would have been even more pronounced.

Here’s the video:

 

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Straight Line Quilting – Quilt Sampler


 

Straight line quilting

Straight line quilting

This straight line quilting tutorial is the first design in my machine quilting sampler quilt.  The whole idea for the sampler has come from all my efforts to engage with Minnie, my longarm quilting machine, over the past few weeks.  I am actually demonstrating the straight line quilting on my normal domestic machine because of course the designs that I am going to use in my sampler can be sewn on any machine.  I have used plain fabric in a light colour with black thread for the quilting so that it shows up well.  The size of the quilt is about 32″ by 42″ for the very technical reason that I had a piece of wadding that size in my stash.  As I go along, I will be subdividing the quilt into sections about 8″ square.

I am not going to go into the basics of setting up for machine quilting, because I have already covered that here.

Straight line quilting ideas

Straight line quilting is the first step when you begin quilting – when you stitch in the ditch or echo quilt you are following the lines of the seams in your quilt blocks.  The next step is to begin to add a little something into the lines so that you can use them as a design in their own right.  As you can see, I have begun with triangles sewn at intervals in a line, then squares – yes, I agree they are more like rectangles than squares!  In the next line I have added hearts and in the final line I have added very simple stars.

Whichever design you want to include in your straight line quilting, the important thing as always is to practise it before you use it in a quilt.  The few designs that I have shown are very basic, so think about variations that you can use – different sizes of triangles within the same line, different spaces between them, different designs within the same line.  Try them all out and decide which variations look right for your particular quilt.

I was going to show you two squares of the sampler in each tutorial, but the video would have been far too long so I am cutting it back to just the one section for each tutorial.  The video goes into some detail and I hope you will find it helpful to see the straight line quilting as I sew it:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

 

HOW TO MAKE FABRIC FLOWERS – ROSE


How to make fabric flowers

How to make fabric flowers

It is so simple to learn how to make fabric flowers.  Last week I paid a flying visit to York  and of course that brought to mind the White Rose of York, the emblem used by Yorkshire during the Wars of the Roses – as opposed to the Red Rose of Lancaster.  As soon as I returned to Ludlow I hunted out some white silk and used it to make a folded fabric rose.

I used silk because I happened to have some white silk and also because silk tends to give a good look to the fabric flower, but it would be perfectly possible to use ordinary cotton fabric.

Cutting requirements

One rectangle about 12″ by 3″, but vary the size according to what size flower you want to end up with.

Making fabric flowers

Fold the rectangle in half

Fold the rectangle in half

Fold a hem at one end

Fold a hem at one end

Fold a small hem at one short end of the rectangle and then fold the entire rectangle in half along its length with wrong sides together.  Slipstitch along the short edge where you folded under the hem.  Baste the length of the rectangle quite close to the raw edges.

 

 

 

Gather along the basting

Gather along the basting

Roll the fabric flower up

Roll the fabric flower up

Gently gather the fabric along the basted edge.  You want to make the rectangle about half as long as it was, so for my rectangle that’s about 6″ long.

Hold tight to the end of the thread (which should still be threaded in the needle) to stop the gathering coming undone and begin to roll the fabric up along the length of the rectangle.

 

 

Stitch the base of the folded rose

Stitch the base of the folded rose

When all the fabric is rolled up, put a couple of stitches through the base to hold the roll together.  You may need to play with the layers a little to get the best rose likeness.  To cover the base of the fabric flower, I often use some green felt as a stem just to hide the raw edges.  Just for interest, I did once try to make this with a scalloped edge along the top of the flower because I thought that this might look even more like petals, but it didn’t work – the folded rose made with just a straightforward rectangle worked best.

 

Here’s the video:

 

Quilt postcards

Quilt postcards

The main reason for my visit to York was to visit the Quilt Museum and Gallery run by the Quilter’s Guild.  The current exhibition was due to finish and I very much wanted to see those quilts before they were taken down.  What a treat!  You can see the postcards that I bought of the Billings patchwork coverlet (on the right) and of of the Challons coverlet (on the left).  The quilts themselves were actually displayed in the exhibition and they were stunning.

Those triangles in the border of the Billings coverlet are made with tiny hexagons – really impressive.

That particular exhibition has closed now and the next one opens on the 6th September.  It’s called ‘It’s all in the making: patchwork and quilting’ and I will definitely be heading up to York again to see that.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose