Ladder Bunting Quilt – Free Pattern

Ladder bunting quilt

Ladder bunting quilt

The Ladder quilt is very, very simple but I think it’s quite striking.  Often I begin a quilt design and then it becomes more and more complicated as I go.  This time I began with three blocks and then gradually reduced it to just the one.  The colours all move along one diagonal or the other and the triangles made me think of bunting.  It’s just a year now since I made what felt like miles of bunting for my second son’s wedding!

The quilt measures 44″ square and I have used 1 yard of blue, 3/4 yard of brown, with 1/2 yard each of red and pink.  I have used nine blocks which are 12″ square finished size.




Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the ladder bunting quilt

6.7/8″ squares:  nine red, nine pink

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty six brown, thirty six blue

For the borders you will need to cut four 2.1/2″ lengths of blue and of brown, cut across the width of fabric.

Half square triangles

Half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 6.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a red and a pink square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 6.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the red and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Sew the strips together

Sew the strips together

Make the four patch units

Sew together 3.1/2″ strips of brown and blue fabric along the length.  Cut these panels at 3.1/2″ intervals to produce rectangles 3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″.

Four patch units

Four patch units

Use two of these for each four patch unit, placing them so that the blue squares are diagonally opposite each other.

Block layout

Block layout

Complete the ladder bunting quilt block

Lay the units out by placing two half square triangle units diagonally opposite each other with two four patch units diagonally opposite each other.

Sew the two four patch units together to create the four patch units and then sew each one to a half square triangle.  Sew the two pairs together to complete the block.

The block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make nine of them.

Assemble the ladder bunting quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three, making sure that the blocks are all facing the same way as each other.

Add the borders

Add the borders

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of brown fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

Make the second border with 2.1/2″ strips of blue fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 44.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the ladder bunting quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/0FJthdr0W1I

Cardiff - People Like Us statue

Cardiff – People Like Us statue

Last week I had a very enjoyable visit to Cardiff.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.

Many thanks to those of you who have commented on my Sewing Quarter demonstrations.  My next demonstration is on October 14th, but I don’t know yet what I’ll be demonstrating.

Tomorrow I have a craft stall at Moseley Arts Market – I just hope the sun shines for me!

Providence Quilt – Free Pattern

Providence quilt

Providence quilt

For this Providence quilt I have used several variations on the Providence quilt block.  My aim was to produce secondary designs threading through the quilt and I’m quite pleased with the way it has turned out.  Sometimes my quilts don’t look a bit like the original idea in my head, but this time it worked.  I have used nine blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.

The quilt measures 53″ square and I have used 1 yard each of dark blue metallic and red fabrics, together with 1.1/2 yards of white, 1/2 yard of cream and 1/4 yard of blue.  The dark blue is rather a pretty metallic floral fabric.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the Providence quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty red, eight dark blue, twenty five blue, seventy two white

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty six cream thirty six white

4.1/4″ squares:  four red, three blue, eleven white, eleven dark blue

For the borders you will need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric in both red and dark blue.

Half square triangles

Half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a cream and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the white and trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Put these to one side so that they don’t get muddled with those made in the next stage.

Begin with half square triangles

Begin with half square triangles

Make quarter square triangles

You can make quarter square triangles by making half square triangles twice.  So begin by making half square triangles using 4.1/4″ squares in dark blue/white, blue/white and red/white.  Place one half square triangle right sides together with another half square triangle.  Add them so that the white on the top square is against the coloured fabric on the bottom square, seams following the same diagonal in both of them.

Completed quarter square triangle

Completed quarter square triangle

Mark a line along the diagonal that crosses the original seam line and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  This is shown in the right hand side of the photo.  Cut along the line to produce two quarter square triangles from each pair of half square triangles that you began with.

Having made half square triangles with all the 4.1/4″ squares, you need to turn them into quarter square triangles in these ratios:  eight half square triangles of dark blue with dark blue together in four pairs,  ten half square triangles of blue with dark blue together in five pairs, eight pairs of red with dark blue together in four pairs.  (I hope that’s right – I’ve tried to count them really carefully!).  Each quarter square triangle has at lease one dark blue triangle so that they can form those diamonds around the central squares.

Corner blocks

Corner blocks

Make the first quilt block

Lay the pieces out in five rows of five.   In each corner place a four patch layout of two white squares with two white/cream half square triangles.  Note that the two cream triangles form a butterfly shape across the corner.  In the middle of each edge place either a dark blue or a red square.

Add a red square in the middle.  On the top and the left hand side of this central square lay a quarter square triangle made with two dark blue triangles.  On the bottom and right of the central square lay a quarter square triangle with one dark blue triangle and one red triangle.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block at this stage measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them – one for each corner of the quilt.

Central block

Central block

Make the second block

The layout for this block is broadly the same as for the first block.  This time place a blue square in the centre and half way along each edge.  Use dark blue/blue quarter square triangles.  Make sure to place them so that the dark blue triangle always lies on the edge of the central square.  That way you form a dark blue diagonal around each central square.

Sew together as above.  The block measures 15.1/2″ square and you just need to make one for the middle of the quilt.

Third block

Third block

Make the third block

Again, this is very similar to the first two blocks.  Place a blue square in the middle with blue squares on the top and bottom edges of the block.  Add red squares to the two sides.  Use two dark blue/blue quarter square triangles and two dark blue/red quarter square triangles.  Lay these so that the dark blue triangles lie against the central square, the blue triangles are above and below the middle while the two red triangles are on the sides.

Sew together as above.  The block measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the Providence quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  In row one you need a block one at each end with a block three between them.  Make sure that the blue runs vertically in the middle block and that the dark blue forms the top left corner in the first block or the top right in the third block.

In row two place the block two in the middle with a block three on either side of it.  Make sure that in the blocks at either end the blue runs horizontally while the red runs vertically.

Row three

Row three

For row three you need a block three in the middle with a block one at either end.  Make sure that the blue runs vertically in the middle block and that the dark blue forms the two quilt corners in the end blocks.

Providence quilt border

Providence quilt border

Add the quilt borders

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

I formed the second border with 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue.  You’ll need two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the top and bottom together with two lengths of 53.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Providence quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/nDSmOKeWeOk

For those of you who have been asking, my next demonstration on the Sewing Quarter channel will be on September 24th – one at 9 am and one at 11 am.

Wednesbury Museum Art Gallery

Wednesbury Museum Art Gallery

Last week I took time off to visit the Wednesbury Museum and Art Gallery.  It’s not far from here and I had a lovely time there.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.  I thought that those etchings on the glass would make lovely quilting designs.

Peace Garden Quilt

Peace garden quilt

Peace garden quilt

Peace Garden is one of Fabric Freedom’s newest ranges and they are lovely muted blues and greens.  This is their quilt to showcase the range and it is a beautiful quilt.  I wouldn’t describe it as a beginner quilt although each part of the quilt can be broken down into small and manageable steps.

The quilt measures 67″ square and is made by sewing the blocks together across the diagonal.  I have used 1.1/4 yards of floral fabric, 1.3/4 yards of light blue, 1 yard of medium blue, 1/2 yard of dark blue, 1.1/4 yards of green with just 1/2 yard of white fabric.  The white fabric is only used in that lovely border where it appears to run behind the blocks.




Light block for the peace garden quilt

Light block for the peace garden quilt

Cutting requirements

Light blocks:  twenty five 8.1/2″ floral squares, one hundred 2.1/2″ light blue squares

Dark blocks:  thirty six 4.1/2″ dark blue squares, seventy two 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ light blue rectangles, seventy two 2.1/2″ green squares, seventy two 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ green rectangles

Infill triangles:  seven medium blue 3.1/4″ strips, seven 2″ white strips, four 2″ green strips, three 2″ light blue strips – all cut across the width of fabric

Corner triangles:  one 9.1/4″ medium blue square

Mark the diagonal of the blue squares

Mark the diagonal of the blue squares

Trim the corners

Trim the corners

Make the light block for the peace garden quilt

Mark a line along the diagonal of the light blue squares.  With right sides together, place on in each corner of a floral square with the marked line across the corner.  Sew along the line.

 

Flip the triangles to complete the square

Flip the triangles to complete the square

Trim the two layers of fabric outside the seam line.  Flip the light blue triangle out so that it completes the square, giving the floral square light blue corners.

There – that was definitely an easy block.  You will need twenty five of these.

 

Strip piecing for the dark block

Strip piecing for the dark block

Make the dark block

The dark block is not much more difficult.  You can speed it up using strip piecing.  Sew together a 6.1/2″ strip of light blue fabric with a 2.1/2″ strip of green fabric.

Cut this panel at 2.1/2″ intervals.  This gives you strips of fabric 8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ long with a green square at the end of a blue strip.  Do this with five strips each of blue and green – you need seventy two blue/green strips.

 

Layout for the dark quilt block

Layout for the dark quilt block

Lay the patchwork out as shown.  Place a blue/green strip at the top with the green on the right and on the bottom with the green on the left.  Across the middle place a 4.1/2″ dark blue (doves) square with a green 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangle on either side.

Sew the three patches together across the middle row and then sew the three rows to each other.  You need to make thirty six of these blocks.

Green infill triangle

Green infill triangle

Make the infill triangles

There is a triangle at each end of each row and these are made with three fabrics.  It is these triangles which give that lovely white section in the border which appears to run behind the blocks of the quilt.

You will need twelve of these with green fabric at the tip of the triangle and eight with light blue at the tip.  They are made in the same way as each other.

Sew together three strips of fabric

Sew together three strips of fabric

Line up one of the inch lines with the cut edge

Line up one of the inch lines with the cut edge

Sew together a 3.1/4″ strip of medium blue with a 2″ white strip and a 2″ strip of either green or light blue.  Line up your ruler so that the 45 degree line runs along the bottom of the fabric.  Make a cut along that diagonal line.

Now line up one of the measuring lines of your ruler with the cut edge of the fabric, making sure that the ruler edge is at the top of the cut edge.  Make a cut along that diagonal from top right to bottom left.  This produces your first triangle.  Continue across the panel of fabric.  This is a fairly wasteful stage, because you can only get three triangles from each panel of fabric, but it is worth it for the lovely effect that it gives in the quilt border.  It would be possible to use the wasted triangles (those at the top of the panel which have a green base) to make a panel for a cushion or a tote bag.

Corner triangles

You may prefer to use a template if you have one for these triangles.  I have shown you the way to cut the triangles using only your ruler because I always prefer to show you the way that you can make my quilts without having to buy specialist equipment.

Make the corner triangles

Make the corner triangles

To make all the infill triangles you will need to sew four panels with a green strip and three panels with a blue strip.

The only remaining block to cut is one 9.1/4″ square of the medium blue fabric.  Cut this along both diagonals to give four triangles which will form the corners of the peace garden quilt.

Top left corner of the quilt

Top left corner of the quilt

Assemble the peace garden quilt

Now you need to put all these blocks back together again!

This quilt is diagonally set, so the first block will be the top left corner of the quilt.  Place a corner triangle down first.  Underneath it place a dark block with the green across the top and bottom of the block.  Place an infill triangle with a green tip either side of the block.  The green tips are at the bottom next to the quilt block.  Sew the block and two triangles together and then sew the corner triangle above the block.

Row two

Row two of the peace garden quilt

Row two of the peace garden quilt

The next row has three blocks – two dark and one light – and two blue infill triangles.  The light block is in the middle with a dark block on either side and a triangle at each end.  These are again placed so that the blue tip is at the bottom next the quilt block.  The two dark blocks are placed with the blue on the top and bottom this time.  Sew the blocks together across the row and then sew the row to the corner unit.

The triangles begin to form the edges of the quilt

The triangles begin to form the edges of the quilt

 

You’ll see that the second row is obviously longer than the corner unit.  Line up the two triangles of the corner unit with the tops of the two dark blocks of row two.  The triangles of row two appear to stick out on their own, but if you look at them from the side you will see that the triangle bases are forming a straight line which will be the edge of the quilt.

 

The rows are forming a large triangle

The rows are forming a large triangle

From now on the rows of the quilt increase by two blocks each time, so row three will have five blocks with two triangles, row four will have seven blocks plus triangles, row five will have nine blocks with two triangles.  In each case the rows begin and end with a dark block and alternate dark and light across the row.

Alternate rows have green infill triangles with the dark blocks placed so that the green is on top of the block.  The other rows have blue infill triangles and the dark blocks are placed so that the blue is on the top and bottom of the block.

Corner triangles on the sixth row

Corner triangles on the sixth row

Assemble the second half of the quilt

Row six marks the diagonal of the peace garden quilt and it is the half way point.  The row is made with eleven blocks and a corner triangle, rather than an infill triangle, at each end.  For this row the dark blocks are placed so that the blue is on top, which should be following the pattern of the alternate rows.

 

Row seven of the quilt

Row seven of the quilt

From the next row, the rows get smaller as we move towards the bottom right corner of the quilt.  Row seven has only nine blocks with two infill triangles.  The important thing to note is that the infill triangles are placed in a different way – the green tip is at the top now rather than at the bottom as it was before the half way row.

Continue with the rows now reducing in size by two blocks each time, but continue the pattern of alternating blue and green.  Row eight will have seven blocks, row nine will have five.

The bottom right corner unit

The bottom right corner unit

Finally you will need to make another corner unit the same as the beginning of the quilt: one row with three blocks and two infill triangles, one row with one block only and two infill triangles, and finally the last of the corner triangles.

That completes the peace garden quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found towards the bottom of the beginner quilting section.

If you found the layout a little confusing, you may find that the video helps: