Sunflower Wall Hanging Pattern

Sunflower wall hanging

Sunflower wall hanging

I made the Sunflower Wall Hanging partly because it’s pretty and very appropriate for the time of year and partly to show you how easy it is to keep adding frames of triangles to a central square.  Below I have given details of two methods for calculating the size of the squares from which to cut the triangles.  I would also like to say a big thank you for all the lovely birthday wishes that I received last week. The wall hanging measures 31″ square and I have used 1/2 yard each of sunflower fabric and yellow background fabric together with 1/4 yard each of two other fabrics from the sunflower range.  

Central area

Central area

Cutting requirements for the sunflower wall hanging

Sunflower fabric: one 4.1/2″ square, three 4.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric for the border Yellow fabric:  two 3.3/4″ squares, two 6.1/2″ squares, two 12.1/4″ squares Turquoise fabric:  two 4.7/8″ squares Sunflower silhouette fabric:  two 8.7/8″ squares.

Fussy cut a sunflower

Fussy cut a sunflower

Cut the central square

Cut a 4.1/2″ strip of sunflower fabric and cut a square that gives a complete sunflower for the middle of the wall hanging.  You can do this with any suitable fabric and you can vary the size of this central square to suit the fabric.

One triangle on each edge

One triangle on each edge

Add the first triangles

Cut the 3.3/4″ squares along one diagonal to form triangles.  Place one triangle on each edge of the central square.

Sew two triangles in place and then press

Sew two triangles in place and then press

You need to sew these triangles to the square in pairs.  Sew the top and bottom triangles and press them open.  Press the seam allowances away from the square.  Then sew the remaining two triangles to the sides and press open. You’ll notice that each triangle is longer than the edge of the square.  Make sure that the triangles extend the same distance beyond the square on each side. Trim the middle of each edge where the triangle tips stick out and if necessary trim the square to 6.1/2″.

How to measure the triangles

How to measure the triangles

How to measure the triangles

Now what happens if you want to use a larger (or smaller) central square?  I use two different methods so that I can check up on myself.  The first method is a simple calculation.  Using a calculator, divide the size of the square edge (4.1/2) by 1.41.  Add 1/2″ to this measurement and cut the square to that size. For the second method I use a tape measure placed across the corner of my cutting mat.  I place the end of the measure on the top line and the 4.1/2″ mark on the right hand line of the mat.  Make sure that these two ends of the tape measure are both the same distance from the corner.  In this case they are both 3.1/4″ from the corner.  Add 1/2″ and you have the measurement of 3.3/4″ which I have used for the squares to make the first round of triangles. Personally I prefer the tape measure method because it gives the result in 1/8″ intervals whereas the calculator gives decimal figures.  Whichever way you use, I hope this will help you to make this design using any size of central square.

The second round

The second round

Add the second frame

In order to make the second round of triangles I have used another sunflower fabric.  Overall I have alternated sunflower fabrics with plain yellow so that you can see what I’ve done more easily.  This time the triangles are cut from 4.7/8″ squares.  Add them two at a time as before and trim the edges.  Your square should now measure 8.1/2″ on each edge.

Sew with the square on top

Sew with the square on top

One thing that I do find useful is to sew the triangles on with the triangle underneath and the square on top.  This means that you can see the stitch lines of the previous frame in the middle of each edge.  You can then make sure that the seam you are now sewing passes just across the corner of the previous seam.  This means that your diamonds keep their points as you build up the rounds.

Add yellow triangles

Add yellow triangles

Another yellow frame

For the next frame cut the triangles from 6.1/2″ yellow squares.  Place one on each edge of the square and sew them on two at a time as before. Trim the edges of the square, which should now measure 11.1/2″.

Third round

Third round

Add the black frame

I have used 8.7/8″ squares to make the triangles for the next round.  Sew the triangles to the yellow square.  Your square should now measure 16.1/2″ on each edge.

Add a final yellow frame

Add a final yellow frame

One final round of triangles

I had intended to finish the wall hanging with the black frame shown above, but I realised that the central square is upright at this stage.  I want it to finish on point, in a diamond shape, so I need one more round of triangles. Use triangles cut from 12.1/4″ yellow squares.  Trim your square to 23″ along each edge.

Sunflower border

Sunflower border

Add the border

I have used 4.1/2″ strips of the same sunflower fabric as that used in the middle for the border. You’ll need two lengths of 23″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 31″ for the sides. That completes the sunflower wall hanging top.  It can now be layered, quilted and bound as for any quilt.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section. Here’s the video: https://youtu.be/TFg7qW2HHGo

Telford

Telford

Thanks for all the comments on my new privacy policy.  I mentioned last week that I had been to a workshop to check that I am doing it correctly.  The workshop took place in Telford in one of the museums of the Ironbridge Gorge.  It’s a beautiful area and it was a lovely day.  This park area combined the new and the old beautifully.

Telford's Iron Bridge

Telford’s Iron Bridge

I would have loved to bring you a photo of Thomas Telford’s original Iron Bridge but it was shrouded in scaffolding while they do some major work on it.  However I managed to find an old photo of it that I took many years ago.  

Vote or no vote

Vote or no vote

This area really took my fancy.  It celebrates the fact that in February 1918 women were first given the vote in Parliamentary elections.  However not all women were allowed the vote – of approximately 160 women working in that area of Ironbridge Gorge at the time only 37 were given the vote.

Wonderful imagery

Wonderful imagery

Each one of those 37 women is remembered with an individual silhouette showing their name.  Wonderful imagery!

Pillar of friendship

Pillar of friendship

The Pillar of Friendship was created when a conference of Master Blacksmiths took place there.  Each panel represents one blacksmith’s idea of friendship.  That was really interesting.  

Multi Coloured Hawaiian Applique Wall Hanging

Palm tree Hawaiian applique

Palm tree Hawaiian applique

The multi coloured Hawaiian applique wall hanging comes as a result of my recent visit to the Canary Islands.  I was fascinated by the variety of palm trees.  I’ve made Hawaiian applique before, but always in one colour only.  I decided to experiment and see easy or difficult it would be to use several colours in the applique.  Cutting out the applique was slightly more difficult when I had to cut across the seam lines, but apart from that my experiment worked well.  I’ve ended up with yellow in the middle for the sand, then brown for the tree trunks surrounded by green for the palm leaves.




Cutting requirements for the multi coloured Hawaiian applique wall hanging

28″ square of sky blue fabric

3.1/2″ squares:  one yellow, one each in two different browns

9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  one each in two different browns

4.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  one each in two different greens

17.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangles:  one each in two different greens

8.1/4″ square of paper

1/2 yard of Mistyfuse or similar double sided fusible interfacing

There are full instructions for drawing the template below, but if you wish to use mine you can download it here.

Mark out a triangle

Mark out a triangle

Make the template

I began with a sheet of A4 paper which happens to be 8.1/4″ wide.  Mark a line 8.1/4″ from the top to create a square.  Mark the diagonal line.  I’ve shaded the bottom section and the top triangle which won’t be needed so that you can see the triangle to be used for the template.

Mark a point 4″ from the left corner on the bottom line of the triangle.  Draw another point 6″ from the left corner on the diagonal line.  These marks show where the brown ends and the green begins when you draw the palm trees.

This template will mark out half of the palm trees because the fabric will be folded when it is cut.

Draw the palm trees

Draw the palm trees

Mark a small triangle in the bottom left corner of the triangle.  This will give you a small star in the finished applique.

Begin with the diagonal edge and draw a line about 3/4″ from the line as far as the 6″ marker.  This is the trunk of the palm tree.  Then branch out and add three palm tree leaves along the rest of the diagonal line, finishing with a line into the corner.  On the bottom edge of the triangle (showing as the right hand edge in the second photo) draw a line for the tree trunk to the 4″ marker point and then add three leaves and a point at the top.  Cut out the template.

Add the brown for the trunks

Add the brown for the trunks

Make the square for applique

Begin with a yellow square (the sand).  Sew a brown square to the top and bottom followed by a brown rectangle to each side.

Add the green

Add the green

Now add a 9.1/2″ green rectangle to the top and bottom followed by a longer green rectangle to each side.

Press all the seam allowances away from the yellow square.  The square measures 17.1/2″ square at this stage.

Add the interfacing

Add the interfacing

Press a layer of double sided fusible interfacing to the back of this square.  I use Mistyfuse, but you can use whatever you prefer.  The important thing is that it’s fusible on both sides as this will mean you can press the final shape to the background square to hold it in place.

Fold the applique square

Fold the applique square

Cut out the template

Begin by folding the applique square in half once and then in half again.

Place this square so that the yellow square is in the bottom left corner.  The bottom and left hand edges will be folded while the top and right hand edges are raw edges.  This step is really important to make sure that your applique comes out as one piece rather than several disjointed pieces.

Pin the template to the fabric

Pin the template to the fabric

Fold the top left corner down to the bottom right corner to form a triangle.  Carefully place the paper template on top of this triangle and pin in place.

Cut around the template

Cut around the template

Using a sharp pair of scissors cut round the template.  This takes a bit of effort when you are cutting across the seam allowances – there are a lot of layers of fabric at these points.  However, the result is well worth the effort!

Applique section

Applique section

Complete the multi coloured Hawaiian applique top

Unpin the template and carefully unfold the multi coloured Hawaiian applique.  Fold the blue background face in half twice so that you have fold lines and can locate the centre where the two folds cross.  Place the applique shape on top of the blue background square and smooth gently.  Make sure that the small star in the middle is placed on the centre of the blue square.

Press carefully, beginning in the middle and pressing along each palm tree.  This will hold the applique in place until you are ready to sew round all the edges to hold the palm trees in place securely.  Layer, quilt and bind as for any quilt.

I am so pleased that I managed to make a project using multi coloured Hawaiian applique and I hope that this has given you lots of ideas for similar projects of your own.

Here’s the video:

Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura

Last week I promised you some photos from my trip to Fuerteventura.  I wrote a separate article and you can see it by clicking here or on the photo.

Butterfly Coloured Trapunto Wall Hanging

Butterfly coloured trapunto wall hanging

Butterfly coloured trapunto wall hanging

I made the butterfly coloured trapunto wall hanging to show you how easy it is to colour your trapunto. The idea of trapunto is that you place extra wadding behind some of the shapes in order to make them stand proud from the quilt.  It looks very effective when you see colours showing through the fabric of a quilt.  I have used a plain white cotton fabric for the background of this wall hanging, then added red felt behind the fabric.  It shows through as pink against the white fabric.

The only fabric used was 1/2 yard of white fabric – that’s enough for the front and the back of the wall hanging – together with four 6″ squares of red felt and 1/4 yard of pink butterfly fabric for the binding and the hanging sleeve.  I also needed an 18″ square of wadding.  You can buy these fabrics in this week’s special offer, but please note that I won’t be able to post it till Tuesday.




Pin felt behind the butterfly

Pin felt behind the butterfly

Prepare the fabric

Cut two 18″ squares in the white fabric – one for the front and one for the back of the wall hanging.  Print and cut out the template – if you want to use mine then you can download it from this link.

Then use a fabric marker to draw round the template four times on the white square.  Pin a red felt square behind each butterfly drawing.

Sew the shape of the butterfly

Sew the shape of the butterfly

Working on the front of the wall hanging, sew all round the shape of the butterfly.  Some quilters use a soluble thread so that they can wash it off afterwards, but I have used a pink thread to match the zigzag stitching that I will use to outline the butterfly later.

Cut the felt around the stitching

Cut the felt around the stitching

Cut the butterfly shapes

Working on the back now, cut the felt squares as close as you can to the stitching.  You’ll need a small, sharp pair of scissors and a lot of care.  The obvious risk is that you will snip the white fabric accidentally.  I try to position one finger between the scissors blade and the fabric and take lots of small snip rather than trying to cut the felt too quickly.

In the photo in the previous paragraph you can see that the two butterflies on the left have been cut out but the two on the right have not.

Zigzag the outlines

Zigzag the outlines

Returning to the front of the wall hanging, stitch all round the butterfly shapes again, this time using a close zigzag stitch.  I used stitch width 2 and stitch length 1, using a pink quilting thread.

You can see that I have added a couple of lines to mark out the body and one line around the bottom of the head.  This made the butterfly more realistic but also it meant that I could do all the zigzagging in one go without having to sew over any lines twice.

The foot on the right works best

The foot on the right works best

With my zigzag stitch I was following the original line of stitching marking out the butterflies.  I found it quite difficult to keep to the line at first so I swapped to a different sewing machine foot.  The foot on the left is the one that I usually use.  The foot on the right was much easier for this work because I could see through the plastic and it had a much wider open section to help me see the line that I was following more clearly.

Layer the wall hanging and quilt

Layer the wall hanging and quilt

Layer and quilt the coloured trapunto wall hanging

Lay the second square of white fabric with right side down, add an 18″ square of wadding and then lay the wall hanging with right side up.

Pin the three layers together and quilt.  I drew a small flower in the middle and did not quilt within the petals so that they stand out a little – but not as much as the butterflies.  The blue you can see is my fabric marker pen:  I was using white thread for the quilting.

Micro meander quilting

Micro meander quilting

Then around thie flower I used a very small meander quilting to really flatten the fabric down.  I think it’s technically known as vermicelli quilting, but it’s basically just micro meander quilting.

Swirls around the edge

Swirls around the edge

This obviously takes longer than larger quilting designs so I changed to a larger swirl design around the edge of the wall hanging.  This served two purposes – it stopped me from getting too bored with the micro quilting and it made a nice frame for the wall hanging.

Bind the wall hanging

Bind the wall hanging

Finish the wall hanging

Finally I trimmed the edges, added binding and a hanging sleeve.  Full details on binding are given here and how to make a hanging sleeve is given here.

Here’s the video:

 

Church in Moseley

Church in Moseley

I love visiting churches because they always feel so peaceful and restful.

They can also provide some great quilting ideas.

Adjoining church in Moseley

Adjoining church in Moseley

These two churches drew my attention because they are so close together.  They are both large and are just the other side of the road from each other.  They are in an area of Birmingham called Moseley and unfortunately they were both closed when I noticed them and stopped to take photos.  So I can’t even tell you if they’re similar to each other inside or not.

 

Friendship Bouquet Wall Hanging Pattern

Friendship bouquet wall hanging

Friendship bouquet wall hanging

The Friendship Bouquet quilt block was a request.  It is such a pretty block that I decided to make four of them to form a wall hanging.  At first glance it looks quite a complicated block, but as usual it is far more simple when you look at it in small sections.  I also liked the name of the block – warm and friendly for this time of year.

The wall hanging measures 26″ square and I used four blocks which are 11″ square finished size.  I needed 1/2 yard of purple batik together with 1/4 yard each of yellow, gold, green and lilac.




Completed friendship bouquet quilt block

Completed friendship bouquet quilt block

Cutting requirements for the friendship bouquet wall hanging

5.7/8″ squares:  four purple

3,3/4″ by 6.1/8″ rectangles:  four yellow – cut these with fabric folded in two layers

3.3/8″ squares:  twelve yellow

2.7/8″ squares:  twenty four purple

1.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangles:  eight gold, eight lilac

5.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ rectangles:  eight gold

9.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ rectangles:  four gold

11.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ rectangles:  four gold

For the border you will need to cut three 2.1/2″ strips of green across the width of fabric.

Add a triangle on each edge

Add a triangle on each edge

Make the diamond in square sections

Cut the 2.7/8″ purple squares across one diagonal to make two triangles from each squares.  Place one triangle on each edge of the 3.3/8″ yellow squares.

Sew triangles two at a time

Sew triangles two at a time

Sew the triangles to the squares two at a time.  On the left of the photo you can see the side triangles sewn in place.  The right hand part of the photo shows those two triangles pressed open.

Add the next pair of triangles

Add the next pair of triangles

Now the two triangles at top and bottom can be sewn to the squares.

Trim the triangle ends sticking out in the middle of each edge and trim the entire block to 4.1/2″ square.  Make twelve of these blocks.

Make the cone section

The handle or grip of the bouquet is formed by sewing two triangles to a 5.7/8″ square of purple fabric.

Forming the handle of the bouquet

Forming the handle of the bouquet

Cut the yellow rectangles along one diagonal to make two triangles from each rectangle.  Make sure that the fabric is folded in half the way it comes from the shop with wrong sides together.  This because for each block you need two triangles which are mirror images of each other.

Lay one of each triangle on the purple square, matching two edges with the edges of the square.  At this stage the triangles are right side up.  This is how you can check that you have the right triangle in each position.

Now flip one of the triangles so that it is right sides together with the purple square.  The top of the triangle should just stick out above the square while the bottom of the triangle should just stick out from the corner of the square.  Sew the triangle in place and cut off the excess purple triangle to the left of the seam.

Add the second triangle

I did try marking a chalk line along the edge of the triangle before I flipped it, but it didn’t really work for me.  You may find that helpful.  I found that making the edges of the triangle stick out a little at each end gave me the best position for the triangle before I sewed it.  These cones will not be beside each other in the finished wall hanging so it doesn’t matter if they are not exactly the same as each other.

Add the second triangle

Add the second triangle

Press the triangle open and lay the second triangle in place.  From left to right in the photo you can see the second triangle placed in position, the excess purple triangle cut off and then the final cone section completed.

Trim these cone sections to 5.1/2″ square and make four of them.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

There aren’t many half square triangles in this block!  Place a lilac 1.7/8″ square right sides together with a gold square.

Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the gold fabric and trim the block to 1.1/2″ square if necessary.

First part of layout

First part of layout

Assemble the friendship bouquet quilt block

For each block you need one cone section and three diamond in a square sections.

Place a lilac 4.1/2″ strip between the top two diamond in a square blocks.  Place one lilac strip above the bottom diamond in a square.

Make two rows

Make two rows

Sew the top three sections together to form one row.  Sew the lilac section to the bottom diamond in a square.  Then you can sew the cone section to the side to form another row.

Sew the rows to each other.

Top and bottom of the frame

Top and bottom of the frame

Add the outer frame

Make the outer frame of the friendship bouquet quilt block with 1.1/2″ gold strips and the half square triangle units.

For the top of the frame place a 4.1/2″ gold strip either side of a half square triangle.  Check the photo to make sure which way to place the half square triangle.

Add a 9.1/2″ gold strip to the bottom of the block.

Sides of the frame

Sides of the frame

The sides of the frame are formed in a similar way.

For the right hand side place a 5.1/2″ gold strip either side of a half square triangle unit.  Sew these together and then sew them to the block.  Add an 11.1/2″ gold strip to the left hand side of the block.

That completes the friendship bouquet quilt block.  Make four of these and trim them to 11.1/2″ square.

Rotate the blocks

Rotate the blocks

Assemble the friendship bouquet wall hanging

Lay the blocks out in two rows of two.  Rotate the blocks so that the cone always points into the corner.  You’ll also see the lilac square frame form around the middle of the wall hanging.  Sew the blocks together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of a green batik fabric to suggest leaves.

You’ll need two lengths of 22.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 26.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the friendship bouquet wall hanging.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

I am sure that you are very busy and won’t want to hear from me over the next week or two so I will not be posting another quilt pattern for two Fridays during the festive season.  My next full pattern will appear on Friday 5th January 2018 when I’ll be posting a new pattern and holding a new year sale.

So it just remains for me to wish you and your family a very Merry Christmas followed by a happy and healthy new year.  Thanks for your interest and support for my website over the course of the year.