About Rose

Spool and Bobbin Quilt – Free Pattern

Spool and Bobbin Quilt

Spool and Bobbin Quilt

I have used the spool and bobbin quilt block along with the Belle’s Favourite block for this quilt and I think that it gives a lovely quilt.  The quilt measures 40″ square, a good size for a lap quilt and I have used 3/4 yard each of purple, lilac and green fabrics, with 1/4 yard of white fabric.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

There are nine blocks,  all 12″ square finished size.  They are all very simple four patch blocks.

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the spool and bobbin quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty purple, sixteen white

3.7/8″ squares:  ten purple, sixteen lilac, twenty six green

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  eight purple

6.1/2″ squares:  ten lilac

For the border you will need to cut four 2.1/2″ strips of green across the width of fabric.




Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make the half square triangle units.  Place a green square with either a purple or a lilac square, right sides together.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.

Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Spool and bobbin quilt block layout

Spool and bobbin quilt block layout

Make the spool and bobbin quilt block

Lay the patchwork pieces out as a four patch unit.  In the top right and bottom left segments place a 6.1/2″ lilac square.  In the remaining two spaces lay out small four patch units with two purple squares and two purple/green half square triangles in each section.  Place the purple squares so that they form the diagonal running from top left to bottom right of the quilt block.  Place the half square triangles in the remaining spaces.  In the top left corner the green triangles are placed top left while in the bottom right corner the green triangles lie in the bottom right of the square.

Sew the small squares together within each four patch unit first.  Then sew each four patch unit to the lilac square next to it.  Finally sew the two rows to each other to complete the block.  This block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make five of them.

Belle's Favourite layout

Belle’s Favourite layout

Make the Belle’s Favourite quilt block

This block is also a simple block to make.  For the first and fourth rows place a white square at each end with a purple rectangle between them.  I know that the white fabric I have used is more pink than white, but I think of it as white.

For rows two and three use lilac/green half square triangles only.  In row two the green triangles together form two larger green triangles pointing upwards while in row three the green triangles form two larger green triangles pointing downwards.  Together they form two green diamonds.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.  At this stage it also measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make four of these.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the spool and bobbin quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Form row one with a spool and bobbin quilt block at each end and a Belle’s Favourite block in the middle.  Note that the lilac squares lie in the top corners of the row and the green triangles lie horizontally in the middle.

Row two

Row two

In row two you need a bobbin and spool block in the middle with a Belle’s Favourite on either side of it.  Note that the two green diamonds are placed vertically in the end blocks and the lilac squares are top right and bottom left in the central block.

Row three

Row three

For row three place a spool and bobbin block at each end with a Belle’s Favourite between them,  This time the two green diamonds are placed horizontally as in the first row.  The lilac squares in the end blocks are placed so that they lie in the bottom corners of the row.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Green for the border

Green for the border

Add the border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of green fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the spool and bobbin quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Wimbledon

Wimbledon

Last week I had a wonderful day at Wimbledon.  Our tickets were for No. 1 Court and on that day we saw two men’s double matches and one mixed doubles match (Jamie Murray).  I hadn’t realised how much more entertaining doubles matches are than singles matches.  The tennis was absolutely spellbinding – fast rallies racquet to racquet when the ball didn’t touch the ground for several shots.  I found it difficult even to see the ball, so can’t comprehend how they had time to react to the ball!

The whole experience was amazing – so well organised and such a lovely atmosphere.

Blue star quilt

Blue star quilt

In between my travels I have been continuing to work on my unfinished projects and if you want to see some of my work click here or click on the photo.

Work in Progress July 2018

Blue star quilt

Blue star quilt

My work in progress is at a wonderful stage at the moment – some quilts are still just tops only, some have been layered, some quilted, some bound and some just waiting for a hanging sleeve or something else minor.

Now that I have given myself more time to work on these projects, I thought that I would share with you what I’m doing and how I am quilting some projects.  As ever, I’m not saying that my way is the correct way – I just hope that it will give you some ideas for your own quilting.




Blue star quilt

This was a quilt that I made to use up some leftover blue fabrics.  I have stitched in the ditch on each diamond within the star sections and then echo quilted 1/4″ in from the seams.  For the blue/pink fabric forming a frame around the central star, I have machine embroidered a star stitch in pink along the middle of each section.  This was to highlight the circular shape of the frame.

Using a bendy ruler

Using a bendy ruler

Palm Tree Hawaiian wall hanging

This one is now complete bar the hanging sleeve.  I used machine embroidery – a blanket stitch – to sew the applique to the wall hanging.  Then I quilted a sort of feather wreath on the background.  There are four sections – one across each corner – but I tried to make them look more like palm fronds than feathers.  I used one of those bendy rulers (technical term that!) so that I could be sure that I had the same shaped curve in each segment.  The yellow section in the middle will have to be hand quilted as I wouldn’t be able to machine sew such a small section.

Sunflower wall hanging

Sunflower wall hanging

Sunflower wall hanging

This now also just needs a hanging sleeve.  I stitched in the ditch around the central sunflower square and then ran a curve between each pair of corners to emphasise that sunflower.  The three petals in all the triangles with some echo quilting in each petal is a great way to quilt triangles – particularly when the project has a floral theme.

Dragon moon wall hanging

Dragon moon wall hanging

Dragon Moon wall hanging

Are you beginning to see a trend here?  I began with small projects so that I could get several finished and then really feel that I was progressing!  This particular wall hanging is just delightful.  I used one of Kona Bay’s dragon moon panels and put several borders on it, using Christmas fabrics with a gold thread running through them.

Quilting detail

Quilting detail

I cut out white circles for moons and hand sewed them to the red border.  Then, using a gold quilting thread I stitched in the ditch between all the borders.  For the central section I used one of the embroidery stitches on my sewing machine – the stemstitch – to create a central diamond and some straight lines across the corners.  I had agonised for ages over how to quilt the central section because I didn’t want to take attention away from the gorgeous panel itself.

I’m pleased with the way it has turned out.

Altogether I have used hand quilting, machine quilting and machine embroidery in this wall hanging – you don’t have to stick to just one type of sewing when you quilt a project.

Longarm quilting

Longarm quilting

Longarm quilting

Obviously Minnie is being kept very busy as well.  If you haven’t come across her before, Minnie is my longarm quilting frame.  I am in the fortunate position where I can have a large quilt set up on Minnie and I can also work on smaller projects on my domestic sewing machine.

On this particular quilt I am meander quilting all the background sections first.  Then I will decide how to use quilting to emphasise the main design.

Practice square

Practice square

Practice squares

I’ve always suggested plenty of practice to help your quilting.  I tend to use individual quilt blocks for this.  I usually have plenty of these lying around from my quilt block patterns.  This gives you a small section to play on and you don’t have to worry about large quantities of fabric.

On this particular one I have tried out different machine embroidery stitches, different shapes for feathers and also different threads – specifically the gold thread that I used above.  Then when the square is full I bind it and use it as a shelf liner.

My pile of UFO’s is still enormous, but I do at last feel that I can make some inroads on it.  I hope you find these suggestions helpful.

Here’s the video:

 

Piano Keys Star Quilt Free Pattern

Piano Keys Star quilt

Piano Keys Star quilt

When I designed the Piano Keys Star quilt my original intention was to place a piano keys border around each block.  However as I went along I decided to use the piano keys sections as sashing rather than complete borders around each block.

I had hoped to create a look where the light blue background to the star blocks blended with the light blue piano keys, while the dark blue plain blocks blended with the dark blue piano keys.  I think that I have achieved this.

I’ve used ten simple star blocks with ten plain squares, all 9″ square finished size.  The piano keys sections are 3″ by 9″ finished size and I made thirty of them.

The quilt measures 49″ by 61″, another rectangular quilt.  I have used 1 yard of red, 1.1/2 yards of light blue and 1.3/4 yards of dark blue fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Quilt components

Quilt components

Cutting requirements for the piano keys star quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  ten dark blue, forty light blue, twelve red

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty dark blue, twenty light blue

9.1/2″ squares:  ten dark blue

1.1/2″ strips:  fifteen light blue, twelve dark blue – all cut across the width of fabric

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ of red across the width of fabric.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a light blue and a dark blue square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the dark blue and clip the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Star quilt block layout

Star quilt block layout

Make the star quilt blocks

I’ve used a very simple nine patch star quilt block pattern.  Place a dark blue square in the middle and a light blue square in each corner.  Place a half square triangle unit in each of the remaining spaces.  Check the photo to be sure that you have them placed correctly.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block measures 9.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make ten of them.

Make three panels

Make three panels

Make the piano keys sections

Sew together five light blue and four dark blue 1.1/2″ strips.  This will give you a panel 9.1/2″ wide and around 42″ long.  Make three of these panels.  Cut the panels at 3.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″.  You will need thirty of these.

Basic rows of the quilt

Basic rows of the quilt

Assemble the piano keys star quilt

Each row of the quilt contains two star blocks, two dark blue plain squares and three piano keys sections.  Each sashing row contains four sashing strips and three red cornerstone squares.

Make three rows as the top row shown, with star, plain, star, plain blocks.  Make four of the sashing rows shown in the middle of the photo.  You need to make just two of the final row shown with plain, star, plain, star blocks.

Sew the blocks together across each row.  Sew the rows together alternating the star rows with the plain block rows and placing a sashing row after every row.

Use red for the border

Use red for the border

Add the piano keys star quilt border

I have used simple 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric to tie in with the red cornerstones.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt with two lengths of 61.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the piano keys star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Washington DC

Washington DC

I have finally written up the Washington part of my American trip.  To see the photos you can click here or click on the photo.

Hawaiian quilt

Hawaiian quilt

I have also been busy finishing quilts and I have found it really satisfying.  I began with a couple of wall hangings that have been waiting in the UFO pile for quite a while.  For this Hawaiian quilt I used a blanket stitch machine embroidery to edge the palm trees.

Sunflower wall hanging

Sunflower wall hanging

I am really pleased with the Sunflower wall hanging.  I drew three petals in each triangle and then sewed each petal shape with a second petal echo quilted just inside the first one.  It’s a very simple design but looks great, I think.

Before the next quilt pattern in two weeks’ time I will write a full article showing you how I have finished various projects.  I’m not suggesting that my quilting is the right way, but I hope that it will give you ideas for your own quilting.

Washington DC – America – Photos

Reflecting pool Washington

Reflecting pool Washington

I took the train to Washington DC from Philadelphia.  It’s an amazing city and I thoroughly enjoyed my visit.  The grid system for the streets makes it so easy to find your way around.  I didn’t realise until I was just leaving that the numbering system begins at the Capitol so you can always tell where you are.  That’s a real bonus for me as I get lost so easily!

When I booked the trip I hadn’t realised that I would be in Washington on Memorial Day.  That turned out to be a real treat.




Lincoln Memorial

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln

I chose to begin at the Lincoln Memorial and walked up the Mall from the Lincoln Memorial to the Capitol.  The photo above shows the Washington Momument being reflected in the pool.  It is possible to go to the top of the Monument and the view from there must be extraordinary.  My time was limited so I didn’t take advantage of that.

The Lincoln Memorial itself is really impressive.  I am so pleased that I have had the opportunity to visit it.

European Memorial

European Memorial

Not far away the European Memorial obviously attracted my attention.  Very peaceful.

Bikers parading

Bikers parading

Memorial Day

The central streets are all closed to traffic on Memorial Day.  Bikers from all over the country fill the city.

They parade from the Pentagon to the Capitol and there are so many of them that the parade seems to last forever.  The air is filled with the sound of motor bikes and the atmosphere is amazing.

White House

White House

White House

I had to include a photo of the White House even though it’s probably the most photographed building in the world.  There’s a lovely park in front of it with lots of statues and trees.  As it was a really hot day it was good to be able to sit in the shade for a short while before continuing my exploring.

Sculpture garden - insect

Sculpture garden – insect

My stay in Washington was all too short, but I thought I’d leave you with two images from the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden.  These were really striking.

Sculpture garden - tree

Sculpture garden – tree

This silver coloured tree is called ‘Graft’.  I loved it.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

Hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Church Tile Quilt – Free Pattern

Church Tile Quilt

Church Tile Quilt

My design for the Church Tile quilt is based on a panel behind the altar in a church that I visited last weekend.  It’s an incredibly quick quilt to make, using mostly squares only.  I don’t have a photo of the panel itself – I didn’t take my phone with me in case it went off during the service and then of course when I saw the tiling I wished that I had it with me.

The quilt measures 46″ by 55″, using 1.1/4 yards of purple, 1/2 yard of green and 3/4 yard each of lilac and gold fabrics.  I’ve used a diagonal setting to create the effect that I wanted and there are very few triangles in the quilt – just round the edges.  The beauty of a diagonal setting is that you can create a design that looks like diamonds but use only squares – nice and easy to sew together.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the church tile quilt

6.1/2″ squares:  four gold, thirty four purple, four lilac, eight green

6.7/8″ squares:  nine lilac

7.1/4″ squares:  one lilac

For the border you need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips of gold fabric across the width of fabric.

Cut the triangles

Cut the triangles

Cut the triangles

To make the corner triangles, cut the 7.1/4″ square along both diagonals.  Make the edge triangles by cutting the 6.7/8″ squares along one diagonal only – two from each square.  These are the only triangles used within the pattern – the rest of the quilt is made using squares only.

Assemble the quilt – top half

Begin the layout in the top lefthand corner of the quilt with one corner triangle – cut from the 7.1/4″ lilac square.

First three rows

First three rows

Beneath that for the second row place an edge triangle on either side of a purple square.  Place the edge triangles (cut from 6.7/8″ squares) so that the right angled corner (the square corner) lies against the square between them.  So it’s bottom right in the first triangle and bottom left in the other one at the end of the row.  The longest edge of the triangle lies on the outside, forming the edge of the quilt.

In the third row place an edge triangle at each end of the row, with a purple, gold and purple square between them.  Place the edge triangles in the same way as those in the row above.  As you can see, the rows are increasing in length.  Each row has two more squares than the row above it.

Rows four and five

Rows four and five

I find it easiest to sew the patches across each row and sew the rows together as I go along – I’m less likely to get in a muddle that way.

In rows four and five place an edge triangle at each end of the rows.  The fourth row contains purple and green alternating squares, beginning and ending with purple.

The fifth row contains five purple squares followed by one green and then another purple square.

Assemble the quilt – middle section

Rows six and seven

Rows six and seven

By now I hope you can see the design of the quilt starting to take shape.  The lilac triangles are forming the left hand and the top edges of the quilt.  Rows six and seven use the same squares as each other, but placed in the opposite order to each other.

Bottom left corner of the quilt

Bottom left corner of the quilt

For row six you need them in this order:  purple, green, purple, lilac, green, two purple, gold, purple.  Place an edge triangle at the beginning of this row and a corner triangle at the end of the row.

This will form the top right hand corner of the quilt.

Other end of rows six and seven

Other end of rows six and seven

In row seven begin with a corner triangle.  Following this place the squares in the reverse order from row six:  purple, gold, two purple, green, lilac, purple, green, purple.  Finish this row with an edge triangle.

As this row begins to form the right hand edge of the quilt, you need to place the final edge triangle in a different way from all the previous rows.  In this case the square corner of the triangle must be placed at the top rather than the bottom of the square next to it.  You can see from the photo that this begins to form a straight line down the side of the quilt.  From now on all the edge triangles will be placed in this way as we work towards the bottom right hand corner of the quilt.

Assemble the quilt – bottom section

The rows now begin to reduce in length.  From row one the number of squares increased by two squares in each row.  Rows six and seven had the same number of squares as each other but from row eight the rows begin to decrease with two squares less in each row.

Bottom right hand corner

Bottom right hand corner

In row eight place an edge triangle at each end of the row.  Between them lay a purple, green and five purple squares.  This is the same as row five but with the squares in reverse order.

For row nine place an edge triangle at each end with purple and green squares alternating between them – purple, green, purple, green, purple.

Row ten contains only three squares between the edge triangles – purple, gold, purple.

Now you can form the bottom right hand corner of the quilt – for row eleven place just one purple square between two edge triangles.  For row twelve use the final corner triangle.  That completes the layout of the rows – continue sewing them to each other as you go along.

Use gold for the border

Use gold for the border

Add the quilt border

As all the edges of this quilt are cut on the bias, having been cut from the diagonals of the squares, it’s a good idea to get the border on as quickly as you can.  This will help prevent the fabric from stretching.  Use 2.1/2″ strips of gold fabric – two lengths of 42.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 55.1/2″ for the sides.

Trim the edges

Trim the edges

Before you sew the border on, trim the edges of the quilt where the triangle tips stick out.

That completes the Church Tile quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey

Last week I mentioned that I was going to Wiltshire for the weekend.  To see my photos of the area, click here or click on the photo.

Over the years I have accumulated vast quantities of part finished quilts, never having time to complete them.  My cupboards are filled with PHD’s (project half done).

After a lot of thought I have decided that it’s time to give myself time to start completing these quilts.  So from now on I am only going to send out one new pattern every other Friday rather than every Friday.  That means that the next pattern will come to you on Friday 6th July rather than next Friday – and I hope I’ll be able to bring you some news of finished quilts then!

Bath – Somerset – Photos

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey

My visit to Bath last weekend was great fun.  I haven’t finished showing you my American photos yet, but they will have to wait till next week.

Bath is a city in Somerset, renowned for its Roman Baths.  I didn’t visit these but I gather that they are very impressive.  The whole area is steeped in history, with Stonehenge not far away.

Bath Abbey dominates the middle of the city.  It’s a beautiful 7th century church.  As you can see there are two layers of stained glass windows which make it very light inside.  Unfortunately I didn’t have time to go inside it, because I’ve just found out that there’s a Heritage Museum in the basement which would have been interesting to visit.

Apparently the Abbey receives hundreds of thousands of visitors each year.




Kaffe Fassett exhibition

Kaffe Fassett exhibition

Kaffe Fassett exhibition

My main purpose in beginning with Bath was to meet up with my future daughter in law and her mother.  I deliberately arrived early so that I could visit an exhibition in the Victoria Art Gallery.

Many thanks to Sue for alerting me to this – the exhibition is called A Celebration of Flowers and it displays both quilts and other needlework from Kaffe Fassett together with ceramics from Candace Bahouth.  Both were totally delightful, with amazing use of colour.  There were no photos allowed so I had to be content with a photo of the poster.

Victoria Art Gallery

Victoria Art Gallery

The exhibition is on till September 2nd and I thoroughly enjoyed drinking in all those wonderful colour combinations.

The Art Gallery is housed in a lovely building with a statue of Queen Victoria above one of the doors.

American Museum

American Museum

American Museum

Just outside Bath is the American Museum.  I had seen some of their vintage quilts at the Festival of Quilts but it was a real treat to see more of the collection.

The museum has been open since 1961 and apparently remains the only museum outside America to display the decorative arts of America.  It is housed in Claverton Manor which sits on a hill and enjoys wonderful views across the surrounding countryside.

Vintage quilts on display

Vintage quilts on display

Some of the quilts are displayed on the wall like this one.  Most of them are displayed on hanging boards so that you can leaf through them.

They rotate the quilts on display so you would need to visit many times to see their full collection.

1718 Silk Patchwork Coverlet

1718 Silk Patchwork Coverlet

As an extra treat for quilters, they have the 1718 Silk Patchwork Coverlet on loan from the Quilters Guild.  It will be there till July 29th.  It really is an extraordinary project – I felt privileged to be able to see it.

The wedding church

The wedding church

Local churches

The area that my future daughter in law lives in contains a grouping of ten churches.  This is the one that will host the wedding – a real picture postcard English country church.

I spent a wonderful weekend seeing the various venues for the wedding and getting to know Anna’s parents.  My job is the bunting and now I have much more idea of what will be required so I can get stuck in on that over the next few months.

Photo Quilt Cushion Cover Pattern

Photo quilt cushion cover

Photo quilt cushion cover

I’ve used this photo quilt cushion cover pattern as an opportunity to show you how to transfer photos to fabric.  You can use this technique for individual photos or text prints, or you can make a memory quilt using all your favourite photos.  The cushion cover I’ve made fits an 18″ cushion pad and I’ve used about 1 yard of the navy blue fabric, just over 1/2 yard of white fabric and about 10″ of the light blue fabric.

Cutting requirements for the photo quilt cushion cover

It’s a bit difficult to give these because it will vary depending on the size of the photo print that you use.  Broadly you need an 18″ strip of navy cut across the width of fabric for the back panel, an 18″ square of white fabric to line the front panel, a white rectangle about 11″ by 8″ for the photo print and varying strips of navy and light blue to frame the photo.




Soak the fabric

Soak the fabric

Treat the fabric

Cut a rectangle about 11″ by 8″ – roughly the size of A4 paper.  You can buy sheets of treated fabric to print your photo, but I find that my printer doesn’t like these so I usually make my own sheets.  You need to treat the fabric so that it will accept (and keep) the photo print.  I use something called Bubble Jet Set 2000.  Pour a little into a flat tray or bowl and soak the fabric completely.  The instructions say to leave it in the solution for 15 minutes, but I usually just leave it long enough to be sure that all the fabric has been soaked.

Scrunch the fabric up to squeeze excess liquid out and lay it on a towel to dry naturally.  Pour any leftover liquid back into the bottle – it’s okay to use it again.

Back with freezer paper

Back with freezer paper

Cut a sheet of freezer paper slightly smaller than the fabric.  You need to back the fabric because it will not go through your printer on its own.  If you haven’t used it before, freezer paper has one side waxy which acts as an adhesive when you iron it.

Iron the fabric to the waxy side of the freezer paper.  You need to do this really thoroughly or the two layers will separate somewhere in the middle of your printer – yes, it has happened to me.

Clip the top corners

Clip the top corners

Trim the rectangle so that the fabric and paper edges are in line.  I find that clipping across the two top corners helps the fabric to pass through the printer.

Add text if you want

Add text if you want

Print your photo

If you want to print a photo with text on it, I find a website called addtext.com very useful.  You can upload a photo and then it will give you options on size, colour and font for any text that you want to add.

For this particular project I just wanted text on a plain background, so I created a Word document, typed in the words and then printed that onto the fabric.  You need to empty the paper tray so that your treated fabric is the only thing in the tray.  I think that your printer needs to be inkjet rather than any other kind and it helps if it accepts different thicknesses of paper.

After printing, remove the paper backing and rinse the fabric in cold water with a bit of washing up liquid added.  Leave to dry naturally.  Trim to the size that you need.

Add the first border

Add the first border

Add the two borders

I used my first border to square the printed fabric.  I added a 2″ strip to each side which gave me a width of 10″ total.  My photo print is 5″ high so I needed to add 5″ to the top and bottom in total.  That means 2.1/2″ each on top and bottom.  Adding 1/2″ for seam allowances meant that I needed two lengths 3″ wide to complete the square.

For the second border I needed to make the panel 18″ square.  This meant adding 4″ to each edge.  I cut 5″ strips to be safe and sewed a length to each side first and then one to the top and the bottom of the panel.

Line the panel

Line the panel

Line the front panel

In order to protect the seam allowances and the photo print I added a lining of white fabric.  Cut an 18.1/2″ white square and pin carefully to the back of the cushion panel.

Turn under a double hem

Turn under a double hem

Make the cushion back panel

I’ve used an envelope closing for the cushion.  For this I cut a panel of the navy fabric 18.1/2″ by about 42″ – basically across the width of fabric.  Turn under a small double hem on each end of this strip on the 18″ edges.

Lay the panel on the backing strip

Lay the panel on the backing strip

Lay this strip of fabric down with right side up.  Locate the centre of both this strip and of the front cushion panel.  Lay the front panel down also with right side up, matching the two centre lines.

Fold up one end

Fold up one end

Turn up one end of the backing strip so that it partially covers the cushion panel.

Fold the second edge down

Fold the second edge down

Then fold the other end of the backing strip down so that the cushion panel is completely covered.  The two ends overlap which provides the envelope opening on the back of the cushion.  Carefully check that all the edges are lined up – there are quite a few layers of fabric there now.  Pin and sew all round the edge of the square.  Turn the project right side out just to check that you have caught all the layers of fabric in your stitching.  Then turn it back wrong side out so that you can zigzag or overlock the edges to neaten up and prevent fraying.

Finally turn the photo quilt cushion cover right side out again and insert a cushion pad.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/2fypAqYBTpc

 

Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell

While I was visiting New York I took a train down to Philadelphia.  What a beautiful city it is!  You can see my photos by clicking here or click on the photo.

Philadelphia – America – Photos

Philadelphia City Hall

Philadelphia City Hall

For my Philadelphia visit I travelled by train from New York.  It was a very short visit so there must be large areas that I haven’t seen, but I did at least have a lovely walk round the historic area.  Philadelphia was founded by an Englishman, William Penn in the late seventeenth century.  He was given the land by King Charles II to pay off the king’s debt to Mr Penn.  He went on to found the state of Pennsylvania.

From my hotel the City Hall could be seen dominating the area – what a lovely building it is.  It also made a useful landmark so that I could find my way to the old city – and also back to my hotel afterwards!




Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell

Philadelphia is well known for being the home of the Liberty Bell, that international symbol of freedom.  the inscription on it reads:

Proclaim LIBERTY Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof

It is impressive for its history as much as for the actual bell itself.  The whole area was very informative – lots of information boards, videos and historical background.  The bell was apparently rung in 1776 when the Declaration of Independence was read out and later became a symbol of liberty for the abolitionists.

Independence Hall

Independence Hall

Congress Hall

Nearby the Independence Hall looked absolutely fascinating.  However entrance is very strictly controlled and I didn’t try to buy advance tickets until it was too late and they were already sold out.

However it was still possible to get into the park area around the Indpendence Hall and that way I could also get to the Congress Hall.

 

Congress Hall

Congress Hall

Luckily the Congress Hall next door was more open to visitors and I thoroughly enjoyed my tour around there.  This photo may look a little lopsided, but it was because I was trying to show the eagle on the ceiling as well as the chairs and table where the Congress used to sit and debate in the early days.  Philadelphia was capital of the United States for ten years while the city of Washington was being built.  It was during a fascinating period when more and more states were signing up to the United States.  Kentucky, Vermont and Tennessee all signed up and ratified the Constitution during this period.

Betsy Ross House

Betsy Ross House

Betsy Ross House

The first American flag ever was sewn in the Betsy Ross House.  I would have loved to see inside this house, but about five school groups turned up at the same time as I did.  I guessed there wouldn’t be room to breathe inside with all those children, so I went on by.

Design ideas

Design ideas

Quilt Inspiration

Of course there are always suggestions of ideas wherever you look in any city, but this rug in the Congress Hall definitely took my fancy.

Now all I need to do is figure out a way of simplifying the design to make it into a quilt.

Statue in the park

Statue against trees

Statue against trees

I’m ashamed to admit that I can’t remember whose statue this is.  I just thought that it was really striking with those trees providing a backdrop for the statue.

All in all I had a thoroughly memorable visit to Philadelphia – and I learned a huge amount as well.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

 

 

New York Flooring Quilt Pattern

New York flooring quilt

New York flooring quilt

My New York flooring quilt is based on a design of tiles that I saw in a New York diner.  I have of course changed the design quite a bit, but that was the basis for the design.  There were many, many more quilt inspirations during my American holiday but this is a nice easy pattern to begin with.

Original tile design

Original tile design

I have kept to the original design for the tile block but then I have added a star block in place of the open spaces of white tiles.  I have rotated the blocks so that the medium blue diagonals change direction half way down the quilt.  The same happens with the light blue diagonals so that I have created two intersecting sideways V shapes forming a small diamond in the middle of the quilt.

The quilt measures 58″ by 76″, using 2.1/2 yards of white fabric, 1.1/2 yards of dark blue, 1 yard of medium blue and just 1/2 yard of the light blue fabric.  I have made twelve blocks, all 18″ square finished size.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed tile block

Completed tile block

Cutting requirements for the New York flooring quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty six light blue, thirty six medium blue, twenty four dark blue, seventy two white

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty four medium blue, twenty four white

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  twelve dark blue, twelve medium blue, twenty four white

12.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  twelve white

18.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  twelve white

For the border you will need to cut seven 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue across the width of fabric.

Make a 4 patch unit

Make a 4 patch unit

Make the tile quilt block

Begin with a simple four patch unit using two medium blue and two light blue squares.

Add the next frame

Add the next frame

Now for the next frame add a medium blue square in two corners and a light blue square in the other two corners.  Make sure that you place them so that one diagonal is all medium blue while the other diagonal is all light blue.  Between the corners on the top and bottom rows place a 6.1/2″ dark blue rectangle.

On each side place a dark blue square on each end of the two middle rows.

New York flooring quilt block layout

New York flooring quilt block layout

Complete the layout with two medium blue and two light blue squares in the corners of the final frame.  Between these place a 12.1/2″ white rectangle in the top and bottom rows.  Use four white squares down each side, so that these rows begin and end with a white square.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block now measures 18.1/2″ square and you need to make six of them.

Half square triangles

Half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

I’ve used a simple star block to replace the open spaces in the original tile design and for this I need half square triangle units.  Use the 3.7/8″ squares.  Place a medium blue and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.

These are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the blue and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Central section of star block

Central section of star block

Make the star quilt blocks

Begin with two 6.1/2″ medium blue rectangles in the middle.  On each edge of this central square place two half square triangle units.  Make sure that the two white triangles together form a larger white triangle pointing towards the middle of the block.  In each corner place a 6.1/2″ white rectangle.  I know that these stick out beyond the other squares, but it just saves a bit of time when sewing the rows together.

Star quilt block layout

Star quilt block layout

For the final frame, add two white squares to the ends of the central rows, one at each end.  As you can see, this evens up the lengths of the rows.

Finally add an 18.1/2″ white rectangle to the top and the bottom of the block.  Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

The star block now measures 18.1/2″ square and you need to make six of these as well.

Rows 1 and 2

Rows 1 and 2

Assemble the New York flooring quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of three.  In row one place a tile block at each end with a star block in the middle.  For the second row place a star block at each end with a tile block in the middle.  Note that the medium blue diagonal runs from top left to bottom right in each of the tile blocks.

Rows 3 and 4

Rows 3 and 4

In row three place a star block in the middle with a tile block at each end.  This time place them so that the medium blue diagonal runs from bottom left left to top right.

For row four lay a star block in the middle with a tile block at each end.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

Add the quilt border

I have used 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue fabric for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 76.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the New York flooring quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Rockefeller square in the rain

Rockefeller square in the rain

As you know by now, I have just returned from a wonderful trip to the USA.  I have pulled together some photos from the New York part of the trip and to see them click here or click on the photo.

I had set the two last patterns to publish automatically while I was away and I gather that the links didn’t work for everyone, so my apologies for that.  As many of you pointed out, I had forgotten to include the fabric requirement for the Columbian  Star quilt – they are 4.3/4 yards of white, 4 yards of purple and 3/4 yard of the floral border fabric.  I have added them to the pattern now and if I can’t get the waterfall video to work I will have to delete it.  Apologies again!

New York – America – Photos

New York skyline

New York skyline

My trip to New York was a wonderful experience.  I also took in Philadelphia and Washington, but I’ll keep those photos for another time.  The flight that I had booked was cancelled so I had to go a day early – what a hardship!  I’m starting with an image of the Observation Tower at Ground Zero – after all the New York skyline has always been amazing and this is obviously a new addition to the skyline.

I’m not going to try and show you photos of places like Times Square because my photos can’t compete with all the wonderful images that professional photographers produce.  Instead I’ll try and bring you some of the less well known places, or of quirky things that I saw.




Inside the 911 museum

Inside the 911 museum

Ground Zero

I visited the museum at Ground Zero.  Last time I was in New York I just visited the area without going inside the museum.  However I was really pleased to see inside the museum this time.  It was a very moving experience.

The quote ‘No day shall erase you from the memory of time’ is  from Virgil and what appears to be blue tiling behind it is in fact thousands of blue cards.  Each one of them is a different shade of blue.

Fashion district entrance

Fashion district entrance

New York fashion district

Obviously I had to take a wander around the fashion district and these sculptures seemed very appropriate at the entrance to the area.  The tailor at his sewing machine and the needle through the button were very striking.

Along 7th Avenue the pavements are decorated with a walk of fame with plaques giving brief outlines of some of the major designers and their work.  I found them really interesting.

Highline New York

Highline New York

New York Highline

What a wonderful idea this is!  A disused high level train track has been turned into a 1.1/2 mile walk high above street level.

What is this tree?

What is this tree?

The walk is just beside the tracks and the entire length has been planted with flowerbeds, shrubs and trees.  It’s a real oasis in a very busy city.

The tree shown was not one I had ever seen before – in the top right hand part of the photo there is a huge white flower.  So if anybody knows what the tree is I would be really interested to know.

Union Jack sweet

Union Jack sweet

Sweets in the bus terminal

In the Port Authority bus terminal there were sweeties everywhere.  That’s not as weird as it sounds!

The terminal is hosting an exhibition and a popup shop devoted to the work of Laurence Jenkell.  These sculptured candies are everywhere, with each one designed around the flag of a different country.  Obviously I had to take a photo of the Union Jack sweet.

Candy Stars and Stripes

Candy Stars and Stripes

In the popup shop there were many more items made from that candy shape which is her trademark.  This flag is made from red, white and blue sweet shapes.

Sewing machine on rock

Sewing machine on rock

Another sewing machine

This sewing machine sculpture appeared on a street corner which I passed on my way back to my hotel.

There was nothing with it to explain it, so I can’t tell you why it’s there, but it certainly grabbed my attention.

Bronx zoo

Family of baboons

Family of baboons

Towards the end of my holiday I needed something calm and restful as I was exhausted.  The Bronx Zoo fitted the bill beautifully.  This family of baboons looked very calm and peaceful – especially the one on the right lying along the trunk of the tree.  If you’re ever near the zoo, it is well worth a visit and it’s much cheaper on Wednesdays.

Monkey

Monkey

This cheeky monkey was a complete contrast to the baboons.  Hasn’t he got a pretty face?

I’m sorry that I can’t remember which type of monkey he is.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose