Blue Bargello Quilt Pattern

Blue bargello quilt

Blue bargello quilt

I’m thrilled with the way this blue bargello quilt has turned out.  I’ve used patches of differing sizes to create the feeling of movement.  The squares and rectangles are 4″, 3″, 2″ or 1″.  However the method of making the quilt differs from the more traditional bargello where you create loops of patches and break into them to create the design.  Instead I have used strip piecing to create panels which use all the different sizes of patches.  An incredibly easy quilt to make, using sixteen 10″ square blocks.

The quilt measures 56″ square and it takes 1/2 yard each of three different blues with 1.1/2 yards of white fabric.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the blue bargello quilt

Dark blue:  two strips 4.1/2″ wide, one strip 3.1/2″ wide, one strip 2.1/2″ wide and two strips 1.1/2″ wide

Medium blue:  two strips 4.1/2″ wide, two strips 3.1/2″ wide, one strip 2.1/2″ wide, one strip 1.1/2″ wide

Light blue:  one strip 4.1/2″ wide, two strips 3.1/2″ wide, two strips 2.1/2″ wide, one strip 1.1/2″ wide

White:  one strip 4.1/2″ wide, one strip 3.1/2″ wide, two strips 2.1/2″ wide, two strips 1.1/2″ wide.

First strip panel

First strip panel

Make the strip panels

Sew together two panels, each one with one 4.1/2″ strip of dark blue, one 3.1/2″ strip of medium blue, one 2.1/2″ strip of light blue and one 1.1/2″ strip of white.  Cut these panels at 4.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 4.1/2″ by 10.1/2″.  You need sixteen of these rectangles.

Cut only the sixteen that you need so that you can use the remainder of the panel for the second border.  The same applies to all the panels.

Second strip panel

Second strip panel

For the second strip panel sew together two panels, each one with a 4.1/2″ strip of medium blue, 3.1/2″ strip of light blue, 2.1/2″ strip of white and 1.1/2″ strip of white fabric.  Cut these panels at 3.1/2″ intervals and make sixteen of these rectangles.

Third panel

Third panel

Make the third panel with a 4.1/2″ strip of light blue, 3.1/2″ strip of white, 2.1/2″ strip of dark blue and a 1.1/2″ strip of medium blue.  You only need one of this panel.  Cut it at 2.1/2″ intervals to make sixteen rectangles.

Fourth panel

Fourth panel

Finally for the fourth panel sew together a 4.1/2″ strip of 4.1/2″ white, 3.1/2″ strip of dark blue, 2.1/2″ strip of medium blue, 1.1/2″ strip of light blue.  You need just one of this panel.  Cut it at 1.1/2″ intervals to make sixteen rectangles.

Press the seam allowances in opposite directions

Press the seam allowances in opposite directions

When you press the strip panels, press the seam allowances in one direction for the 4.1/2″ and 2.1/2″ strips.  Press them in the opposite direction for the 3.1/2″ and 1.1/2″ strips.  That way your seams will nest together when you sew the rectangles together.  The photo shows the back view of the block.

Quilt block layout

Quilt block layout

Make the blue bargello quilt block

Take one rectangle from each of the four panels.  Lay them out as shown in decreasing order with the 4.1/2″ strip of the left and the 1.1/2″ strip on the right.  Sew the strips together to complete the block – really simple, isn’t it!

The block measures 10.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make sixteen of them.

Rows one and two

Rows one and two

Assemble the blue bargello quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  In order to construct the design you need to rotate the blocks.  Use the 4.1/2″ dark blue square as your reference.  In row one this square is placed bottom right, bottom right, bottom left and bottom left.

For the second row place the dark blue square top right, bottom right, bottom left and top left.  You can see where the two dark blue squares together form rectangles as a guide, and the white patches are forming the top half of circles.

Rows three and four

Rows three and four

For row three place the dark blue square bottom right, top right, top left and bottom left.

In row four you need to place the dark blue square top right, top right, top left and top left.  You still have several dark blue rectangles forming and the white patches are now forming the lower half of circles.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

First border

First border

Add the borders

For the first border I used 3.1/2″ strips of white fabric. This was to help the design of the quilt to stand out.  You’ll need two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 46.1/2″ for the sides.

Use the remaining strip sets

Use the remaining strip sets

For the second border I wanted to use up the remaining sections of the strip panels.  I cut all the remaining pieces into 2.1/2″ widths.  Luckily I ended up with twenty of these rectangles which was just what I needed.  I sewed them together in four rows of five strips, giving me four 50.1/2″ lengths.

Second border

Second border

For the border I needed two lengths of 46.1/2″ and two lengths of 50.1/2″, so I could trim two of the lengths for the top and bottom and use the full lengths for the sides.

If you don’t manage to cut twenty 2.1/2″ strips from your leftovers you can always just add some extra 2.1/2″ sections of one of the blues.

Third border

Third border

Third and final border

For the final border I used 3.1/2″ strips of white again.  You’ll need two lengths of 50.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 56.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the blue bargello quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/xOeQ6hhWdOM

Birmingham Peace Garden

Birmingham Peace Garden

Last week I visited somewhere that I’ve wanted to see for a long time.  I’ve seen it from the bus on my way into town but never actually got round to stopping off to see it.  It’s the St Thomas Peace Garden and to see my photos click here or click on the photo.

Busy, busy weekend coming up – I’m off to London to see the family tomorrow, then on Sunday I have a craft stall in Cannon Hill Park and on Monday it’s back to London to go to Wimbledon with my daughter.  We have tickets for Number One Court which is very exciting.

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Comments

  1. Elizajane says:

    Thanks for the wonderful simple Bargello quilt. I made a King size one (25 fabrics) last year and never again lol. I also enjoyed your History lesson, so are so fortunate to be surrounded by so many interesting places. <3

    • Hi Elizajane. That was a very ambitious quilt that you made. Well done. Yes, I am lucky to live in such a wonderful area.

  2. Your quilt is lovely but I don’t understand why you are calling it a bargello pattern? You made another (another winner) bargello quilt 8/10/2012 and it doesn’t look anything like this pattern. Please explain the difference? Every other bargello quilt I’ve seen looks like the one you made 7 years ago.
    Temperatures in the 90’s here. I’m staying indoors because it’s too hot to go outside. Enjoy your day tomorrow in London and the games at Wimbledon.

    • Hi Claire. Lovely to hear from you. You are right – this one is very different from the last one I made (was it really 7 years!!). This one is called twisted bargello. The basic principle of using the same lines of colours still applies, but in this quilt they are sewn together four at a time and then can be rotated to form different designs. This differs from the first one where I broke into a loop of colours at different stages. I have also this time used different sizes of patches which I think is more true to bargello than the first one where I was aiming for simplicity more than anything. I don’t know if that clarifies it for you – I think I would agree with you that they are totally different techniques.

  3. Rose,
    I looked at the pattern and went there is no way this is easy.
    The mention of 1″ rectangles I immediately thought ERROR.
    After reading your instructions should have trusted you.
    Enjoy your time with family.
    Good Luck on Sunday wishing you a very successful day.
    Hope the weather holds for Wimbledon on Monday.
    Rose, Thank you have a sew happy week-end.

    • Hi Mary. Glad you saw how easy the quilt pattern is. I would hesitate to sew such small pieces normally, but by strip piecing you are not actually sewing individual seam for 1″ patches. Thanks for your kind wishes.

  4. Sandra Barnett says:

    oh Rose,
    Good luck with everything you are doing. The quilt pattern looks simple enough to make, all rectangles. I think I could do it. Found a few quilt tops that I had put away awhile ago must quilt them. Have one still on the machine and another one half together.
    Glad you are seeing your daughter and having fun with her. Good luck at Wimbleton. I hope your person wins. Have a great weekend. Happy Quilting.
    Sandra

    • Thanks, Sandra. The quilt is definitely very easy to make. Like you, I have been looking out quilt tops that need finishing – unfortunately I seem to have so many of them!
      I’m definitely looking forward to Wimbledon – a real treat.

  5. Meredith says:

    Thank you, Rose; that is SO lovely! (Plus, it’s BLUE!)
    I recently purchased two sets of beautiful, hand-dyed, chromatic fabrics to make a small traditional Bargello, but your design has inspired me to tackle the “simpler” version first. Hope you have a lovely weekend full of joys.

    • Hi Meredith. This one is definitely simple to make and a good warmup for full blown bargello quilts!

  6. Larissa Wangarodskaya says:

    Очень интересное баржелло! Просто необыкновенное! Необычное его прочтение… Спасибо за этот интересный урок!