Curved Log Cabin Quilt Pattern

Curved log cabin quilt

Curved log cabin quilt

My curved log cabin quilt pattern has turned out really well – well I think so, anyway!  I’ve used the basic log cabin quilt block but with different sized logs.  This means that the red square which began in the middle of the block actually ends up way off centre.  Traditionally, the central square of a log cabin block is red to represent the fire in the hearth of a log cabin.  The colours move from dark to light on each side and I have added the logs clockwise rather than anti clockwise.  The quilt measures 60″ square.

I made sixteen identical blocks and created the design by rotating the blocks.  Each block is 14″ square finished size and I used 1 yard of red, 3/4 yard each of the two darkest blues and darkest light fabrics, with 1/2 yard each of the two lightest blues and the third lightest light fabric, and just 1/4 yard of white fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements

The red squares in the middle are 2.1/2″.  The blue logs are 2.1/2″ wide while the light logs are 1.1/2″ wide.  I made the border with 2.1/2″ red strips.  I haven’t listed the log sizes here because it would take me half a page to do that and also because you may prefer to speed piece the logs – details below.

Cut the central square

Cut the central square

Central square

Sew together 2.1/2″ strips of red and the lightest blue along the length.  Cut this panel at 2.1/2″ intervals to give rectangles 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″.  These will form the central red square and the first blue log of the block.

You need to make sixteen of these.

First round of logs

Add the second log

Add the second log

For the next blue log you could cut a 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ blue rectangle and sew it to the left hand side of the red square.

Speed piecing

Speed piecing

Alternatively, if you wish to save time with speed piecing, you can cut a 2.1/2″ strip and sew the blue/red rectangles to it.  Place the rectangle on the blue strip.  Make sure that the red square is above the blue square and keep adding more blue/red rectangles until you have sixteen – for this you will need more than one blue strip.

Cut the strip between the rectangles

Cut the strip between the rectangles

Cut the blue strip between each pair of rectangles.  I find this speed piecing much quicker than cutting each log individually before sewing it.  If you are unclear of how I’ve done this, you may find the video helpful – link at the bottom of the page.

Add the first white log

Add the first white log

I’ve made the next two logs of this frame using 1.1/2″ strips of white fabric.  You need a 4.1/2″ rectangle across the top.  This is shown on the right of the photo.  If you’re speed piecing then place the white strip and the block as shown on the left of the photo.

Second white log

Second white log

Add a 5.1/2″ white strip down the right hand side of the block, shown on the right of the photo.  If you’re speed piecing, place the blocks on the white strip as shown on the left of the photo.  This completes the first round of logs around the central square.

First log, second round

First log, second round

Second round of logs

For this round you need the next darkest blue and light fabrics.  The blues are always 2.1/2″ wide and the lights are always 1.1/2″ wide so I’ll just specify the lengths of the logs from now on.  Add a 5.1/2″ blue strip across the bottom of the block.  Place the block against the blue strip as shown on the left if you are speed piecing.

Second log, second round

Second log, second round

For the second log sew a 7.1/2″ blue rectangle to the left hand side of the block.

The speed piecing option is shown on the left of the photo.

Third log, second round

Third log, second round

For the next log sew a 7.1/2″ light rectangle to the top of the block.  Speed piecing option shown on the left.

Fourth log, second round

Fourth log, second round

Make the final log of this round using an 8.1/2″ light rectangle down the right hand side of the block.

For speed piecing place the block as shown against the light strip.

First log, third round

First log, third round

Third round of logs

Add an 8.1/2″ strip of the next darkest blue across the bottom of the block.  Place the block as shown for speed piecing.

Second log, third round

Second log, third round

Now add a 10.1/2″ blue strip up the left hand side of the curved log cabin quilt block.

Speed piecing shown on the left of the photo.

Third log, third round

Third log, third round

Use the third darkest light fabric for the next two logs.  Add a 10.1/2″ strip across the top of the block.

Fourth log, third round

Fourth log, third round

Now sew an 11.1/2″ rectangle down the right hand side of the block.

Speed piecing layout shown on the left of the photo.  That completes the third round of logs – just one more round to go now!

First log, fourth round

First log, fourth round

Fourth round of logs

Using the darkest blue (I’ve used purple) place an 11.1/2″ strip across the bottom of the block.

Second log, fourth round

Second log, fourth round

Sew a 13.1/2″ rectangle up the left hand side of the block.

Placement of the block for speed piecing shown on the left.

Third log, fourth round

Third log, fourth round

Using the darkest of the light fabrics (I’ve used yellow), sew a 13.1/2″ strip across the top of the block.  For some reason I seem to have taken the photo when the block was upside down, so please take care when placing this strip.

Fourth log, fourth round

Fourth log, fourth round

For the final log of this curved log cabin quilt block, sew a 14.1/2″ strip down the right hand side.  This time the block is the right way up!  The block should now measure 14.1/2″ square and you need to make sixteen of them.

First two rows of blocks

First two rows of blocks

Assemble the curved log cabin quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  I think that using the purple corner for reference will be clearest.  Make row one with two pairs of blocks where the purple corner is bottom right, bottom left, bottom right again and then bottom left.

In row two place the purple corners top left, bottom right, bottom left and then top right.

Rows three and four

Rows three and four

Row three is similar to row two.  Place the purple corners bottom left, top right, top left and bottom right.

In row four the purple corners are top right, top left, top right and top left.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

Add the border

I have picked out the red of the central squares for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 56.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the curved log cabin quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Warwick Castle

Warwick Castle

Recently I visited somewhere that has been on my list for a long time – Warwick Castle.  It is relatively close to where I live and to see my photos you can click on the photo or click here.

Tomorrow I have a stall at Moseley Art Market – I hope that it’s not going to be as cold as they are forecasting!

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Comments

  1. Sue Craighead says:

    Hi Rose,
    This pattern and the colors are fantastic. I’m ordering the kit.
    Question?? This is sixty inches square? Could more blocks be added to make it larger? More to a queen size? Our beds are queen size with really deep measurements on mattress so 60 inches would be way short, both ways.
    Could you figure the extra fabric that would be needed to enlarge? Thanks a bunch and have a wonderful weekend. Bundle up and stay safe and healthy..
    Yours truly, Sue

  2. Rose do you think that the pattern would lend itself
    to a more scrappy look?.
    Good Luck at the art market. I really hope you do very well.
    Rose, your photos are always interesting.
    Thank you.

  3. Sandra Barnett says:

    Oh Rose,
    Love the quilt pattern. A log cabin block that is off center. Genius!. The colours are great also. Glad you incorporated purple in the mix.
    Have been busy I guess you could say doing nothing. Have been crocheting and reading. That’s about all. Must get back to quilting and Christmas shopping. It will be here before you can blink.
    Hope you have great weather for you stall. I think doing Christmas related stuff is great because people will buy as they are thinking of the holidays.
    Have a great weekend and Happy Quilting.
    Sandra

    • Hi Sandra. I did think of you when I put purple as the final blue. I think reading is one of my favourite relaxations – I certainly wouldn’t count it as doing nothing. I think that in America you have Thanksgiving first – with us we tend to concentrate on Christmas.

  4. Louise A Johnson says:

    Fabulous! Thanks for also posting photos!

  5. Colleen McKinoay says:

    Excellent directions on your curved log cabin quilt. I have never made a log cabin block but am definitely going to give it a go after reading over your excellent directions. I have a few jelly rolls that could be used for most of the pattern. Very impressive quilt Rose. Very striking colour combinations but then blue tones are a favourite of mine. Love it.💕 I understand that the red square is historically part of very early Canadiana log cabin quilts. It represents the heart of the home or the warmth and love of a home. Makes a log cabin quilt all the more special.
    Colleen
    PS Bundle up and keep warm in your stall. Hope you are not going to have an early white winter. Here on the west coast of Canada we are just starting our rainy season with windy days and blowing leaves. Lots of raking ahead.☔️🍂🍁🍃

    • Hi Colleen. I have several log cabin quilt patterns on the website. If you type ‘log cabin’ in the search box (top right) it should show you all the patterns. It’s definitely a great quilt block – so many patterns that you can make with it and so simple to make. Blue is also my favourite colour. You’re right about the significance of the red square – I usually try and stick with that bit of tradition when I make a log cabin quilt. I certainly will be well wrapped up today. I think that we’re due to turn mild again next week, so this cold snap isn’t here to stay. Our leaves all came down during the last few storms – good luck with raking yours up.

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