Coughton Court – Alcester – Photos

Coughton Court

Coughton Court

For my visit to Coughton Court I managed to choose a day that was dry and not too cold.  It’s a National Trust property not far from here.  The Throckmorton family have owned it for hundreds of years – since 1409 in fact.  They were a very powerful family with many ties to the royal family.

Coughton Court is a Grade I listed building, a Tudor house that is brimming over with history.  The grounds are delightful and the interior is packed with treasures.





Outside Coughton Court

Back view of Coughton Court

Back view of Coughton Court

Coming out the back of the building, I couldn’t help feeling that this entrance was just as stunning as the front entrance.  This area must have been very sheltered and a real suntrap.  From here you could access the walled garden which was definitely the largest that I had ever seen.

The lake

The lake

The grounds are extensive and there were newborn lambs in a few paddocks close to the house.

As usually happens in National Trust properties, there were many walks marked out.  One of them led round this delightful lake – lots of daffodils gave a lovely splash of colour to it.

Inside the Catholic church

Inside the Catholic church

The Churches

There are two churches within the grounds.  I couldn’t get near the Protestant church as it was shrouded in scaffolding, but this is the interior of the Catholic church.  Very peaceful and relaxing.

Tapestry

Tapestry

The Interior

The interior of the court is stunning.  There were some beautiful tapestries and I was surprised at how well the colour had lasted on these.  Sometimes in these old properties the tapestries have become very dark with age.

In the bedroom

In the bedroom

Inside one of the bedrooms was a very comfortable looking four poster bed.  That woodwork at the foot of the bed is apparently an adapted set of antique library steps.

Beautiful rugs

Beautiful rugs

This time, the rugs were on the floor, not the tables.  I suppose when you have the sort of wealth that the Throckmorton family had, you have no need to show off your rugs on tables.

Stained glass window

Stained glass window

The Windows

One feature that really stood out for me was the stained glass windows.  I’m sure we’ve all made our own stained glass quilts, but the detail in these windows was way beyond anything that I would attempt!

The custom many centuries ago was to commemorate a wedding with a stained glass window naming the two families.  This particular window celebrated the wedding of a Catesby with a Throckmorton.  If you’re familiar with the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 you’ll know that Robert Catesby was the ringleader of the plot.  In fact Coughton Court was one of the escape venues for the plotters.  This surprised me because I’d always assumed that everything happened in London, but I now know that there was quite a big Midlands involvement.

I had a wonderful day out – a lovely mix of history, pleasant walks and beautiful rooms to view.

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Comments

  1. Carol Tambourine says:

    I love reading about your travels. Thank you.

  2. Marilyn Devlin says:

    Thank you so very much for posting your trip and pictures. Marilyn D. – Perth, Ontario, Canada

    • Hi Marilyn. Glad you like the travel photos. I didn’t know that there was a Perth in Canada as well as our one in Scotland.