Budapest Quilt Pattern – Floor Tile Design

Budapest quilt

Budapest quilt

The Budapest quilt design is based on floor tiles that I saw on my recent visit to Hungary.  You can find a link to the photos from that trip at the bottom of the page.  The quilt measures 67″ square, using nine 15″ blocks with three borders.

For the borders I have used blue strips for borders 1 and 3, with a smaller version of the central block for border 2.

I have used 2.1/2 yards of cream fabric, 1.3/4 yards of red and 1.1/2 yards of blue.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Original tile design

Original tile design

There were so many wonderful buildings from which to choose a design that it was difficult to choose one, but the quilt is loosely based on the tiles in this photo.

Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the Budapest quilt

Central block:  one 11.1/8″ red square, two 8.3/8″ cream squares

Cross block:  sixteen 6.1/2″ cream squares, sixteen 3.1/2″ cream squares, twenty 3.1/2″ red squares

Third block:  sixteen 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ cream rectangles, sixteen 3.1/2″ cream squares, eight 3.1/2″ red squares, eight 9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ red rectangles, four 14.1/2″ by 3..1/2″ red rectangles

For borders 1 and 3 you will need to cut twelve 2.1/2″ blue strips across the width of fabric

For border 2 you will need thirty two 5.1/2″ red squares and sixty four 4.3/8″ cream squares.

Central block layout

Central block layout

Make the central block

I have made a simple diamond in a square block for the middle of the Budapest quilt.  Cut the 8.3/8″ cream squares along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square.  Place one cream triangle on each edge of the 11.1/8″ red square.

Sew the two side triangles first

Sew the two side triangles first

Sew two opposite triangles on to the square, press them open and then add the remaining two triangles.

Trim the middle of each edge where the triangle tips stick out.  The block now measures 15.1/2″ square and you just need to make one.

Cross block layout

Cross block layout

Make the cross block

The layout for this block is very simple.  Place a 6.1/2″ cream square in each corner.  Between the top two corners place a cream and then a red 3.1/2″ square.  For the bottom two corners place a red and then a cream 3.1/2″ square.  Make the middle row with a 9.1/2″ red strip in the middle and a 3.1/2″ cream square at each end.

Sew the red and cream squares together first and then you’ll be able to sew all the pieces together in three distinct rows.  Sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

The cross quilt block now measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of these.

Layout for the third block

Layout for the third block

Make the third block

In the third block I have tried to use rectangles rather than individual squares as much as possible in order to save time sewing the block.

Make rows one and five with a red square in the middle and a 6.1/2″ red rectangle on either side.

Rows two and four contain a 9.1/2″ red rectangle with a cream square at each end.

For row 3 you just need one 15.1/2″ red rectangle.  Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It now measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the Budapest quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Rows one and three are the same as each other, with a cross block in the middle and a third block on either side.

Row two

Row two

For row two place the diamond in a square block in the middle with a cross block on either side of it.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  At this stage the Budapest quilt top measures 45.1/2″ square.

First border

First border

Add the first quilt border

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ blue strips to separate the main quilt from the borders.  You will need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

Add the second border

Make smaller blocks

Make smaller blocks

In the second border I have used a reduced version of the central diamond in a square block.  This time I used 5.1/2″ red squares surrounded by triangles made by cutting 4.3/8″ cream squares along one diagonal.  Don’t forget to trim the edges of the block where the triangle tips stick out.  Each block now measures 7.1/2″ square and you need to make thirty two of them.

Press the seam allowances open

Press the seam allowances open

Sew the blocks together in two rows of seven blocks and two rows of nine blocks.  I have pressed the seam allowances open along these strips as the middle of the seam can be quite bulky.

Border two

Border two

Sew one row of seven blocks to the top of the quilt and one to the bottom.

Sew one row of nine blocks to each side of the quilt.

Border three

Border three

Third quilt border

Finally for the third border I have returned to the 2.1/2″ strips of blue fabric.  You need two lengths of 63.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt with two lengths of 67.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Budapest quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

River Danube and Budapest

River Danube and Budapest

As I mentioned at the start of the page, this quilt was inspired by my trip to Budapest in Hungary.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.

The weather seems to be doing strange things all across the world and I hope that you can stay safe and warm over the weekend.

 

Budapest – Hungary – Photos

Budapest - Hungary

Budapest – Hungary

Budapest has been on my list for a long time and I am delighted that I have finally managed to visit this beautiful city.  The River Danube runs right through the city, which was once the three cities of Bhuda, Obhuda and Pest (pronounced pesht).  I had always thought that Budapest was created from the two cities of Bhuda and Pest, so that was the first thing that I learned on my arrival.

Most photos of Budapest focus on the unbelievably beautiful buildings so I thought that I would open with a photo of a statue way above the city – it took me a long time and a lot of puffing and panting to climb up there but it was well worth it to see the panorama of the city spread out beneath me.




Budapest's Statue of Liberty

Budapest’s Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty Budapest

The statue above was actually a sidekick to Budapest’s very own Statue of Liberty.  This was perched on the hilltop on the Bhuda side of the river and completely dominated the skyline no matter where you were in the city.  It’s a very impressive area with magnificent views – appreciated all the more because it was such a steep climb to reach it.

It was erected in 1947 and shows Liberty holding a palm leaf aloft.  Actually, I thought it was a feather and have only just realised that it isn’t!

St Gerhard

St Gerhard

I have to confess to a senior moment here – while I was on a Danube cruise I heard the guide talking about the statue of the Archbishop while directing our attention to that side of the river.  So I thought that Liberty was the Archbishop until I climbed up the hill and realised that she couldn’t possibly be a man.

In fact the statue of St Gerhard is half way down the same hill that Liberty stands on.  He was the first bishop of Hungary.  The cruise guide told us that he was flung off the hill for his beliefs and that the waterfall beneath him signifies his death in the Danube, but I can’t find any reference to that anywhere else.

Parliament building

Parliament building

Parliament Building

The Parliament Building is best viewed from the river to get the full impact, but this is the front entrance.  They were obviously expecting someone special on this day – the red carpet was being unrolled while we watched and there was a very heavy army presence.  The following day we were allowed on to the area immediately in front of the palace so that we could see the memorial to those killed in the 1956 uprising.  I felt sad to see how open the area was – compared with our own Palace of Westminster which has to be so heavily barricaded and policed.

St Mathias church

St Mathias church

St Mathias Church

There is an area of Budapest called the Fisherman’s Bastion, built at the end of the 19th century to provide a panoramic view of the city.  This is beautiful but it was the Church of St Mathias just behind it which really caught my attention.  The roof alone dominates the area – such lovely patchwork designs created with the roof tiles.  I knew that the inside must be special and I wasn’t disappointed.

Inside the church

Inside the church

Inside, the church was breathtaking.  Every inch was decorated and the overall effect was eyewateringly beautiful.  Even with all the tourists the church managed to maintain a peaceful and calming atmosphere.

I took loads of photos of the interior – definitely lots of quilt inspiration there!

Shoes on the Danube

Shoes on the Danube

Shoes on the Danube

I had heard of the shoes on the banks of the Danube but it was still very moving to see them.

They are laid out along a stretch of at least 20 yards – sixty pairs of all shapes and sizes made in iron.  The memorial was created to remember the 3,500 people killed by the Arrow Cross militia men during the war.

The people were lined up on the banks of the Danube then ordered to take off their shoes.  When they were shot their bodies fell into the river.  The shoes are made of iron and many people have left flowers or candles in amongst the shoes.

Hungarian embroidery

Hungarian embroidery

Hungarian embroidery

Hungary embroidery is world renowned and it was a real treat to see it everywhere.

I have to admit that some of it looked mass-produced, but there were also ladies sitting in many areas embroidering the most delightful table runners and clothing.

Heroes Square

Heroes Square

Heroes Square

On our last day we visited Heroes Square.  This is a very impressive square where the Pope celebrated mass when he visited Budapest.  the figure at the top of the column is the Archangel Gabriel.

The square was laid out at the end of the 19th century to mark 1000 years of Hungary and there are magnificent museums and art galleries around it.

Museum in City Park Budapest

Museum in City Park Budapest

Behind the square lies City Park – an oasis of calm.  We didn’t go in to this museum but the architecture was a reminder of how these wonderful buildings seem to appear wherever we walked in Budapest.

Polar bears in the zoo

Polar bears in the zoo

We walked among the trees and fountains and then happened upon the zoo.  These polar bears were probably picking fish off each other’s teeth, but it was rather nice to imagine that they were kissing!

We visited so many places within the city that I haven’t been able to show you a fraction of my photos, but Budapest is a beautiful city – well worth a visit if you ever get the chance.

The beauty of Budapest

The beauty of Budapest

We travelled around on trams and buses.  Each journey cost the equivalent of about £1 although if I had been a year older I would have travelled for free.  All EU citizens over 65 travel free on Budapest’s extensive public transport system.  Food and wine are cheap and around every corner you can find a magnificent building to gaze at in awe.

 

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