Providence Quilt – Free Pattern

Providence quilt

Providence quilt

For this Providence quilt I have used several variations on the Providence quilt block.  My aim was to produce secondary designs threading through the quilt and I’m quite pleased with the way it has turned out.  Sometimes my quilts don’t look a bit like the original idea in my head, but this time it worked.  I have used nine blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.

The quilt measures 53″ square and I have used 1 yard each of dark blue metallic and red fabrics, together with 1.1/2 yards of white, 1/2 yard of cream and 1/4 yard of blue.  The dark blue is rather a pretty metallic floral fabric.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the Providence quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty red, eight dark blue, twenty five blue, seventy two white

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty six cream thirty six white

4.1/4″ squares:  four red, three blue, eleven white, eleven dark blue

For the borders you will need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric in both red and dark blue.

Half square triangles

Half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a cream and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the white and trim the two corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Put these to one side so that they don’t get muddled with those made in the next stage.

Begin with half square triangles

Begin with half square triangles

Make quarter square triangles

You can make quarter square triangles by making half square triangles twice.  So begin by making half square triangles using 4.1/4″ squares in dark blue/white, blue/white and red/white.  Place one half square triangle right sides together with another half square triangle.  Add them so that the white on the top square is against the coloured fabric on the bottom square, seams following the same diagonal in both of them.

Completed quarter square triangle

Completed quarter square triangle

Mark a line along the diagonal that crosses the original seam line and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  This is shown in the right hand side of the photo.  Cut along the line to produce two quarter square triangles from each pair of half square triangles that you began with.

Having made half square triangles with all the 4.1/4″ squares, you need to turn them into quarter square triangles in these ratios:  eight half square triangles of dark blue with dark blue together in four pairs,  ten half square triangles of blue with dark blue together in five pairs, eight pairs of red with dark blue together in four pairs.  (I hope that’s right – I’ve tried to count them really carefully!).  Each quarter square triangle has at lease one dark blue triangle so that they can form those diamonds around the central squares.

Corner blocks

Corner blocks

Make the first quilt block

Lay the pieces out in five rows of five.   In each corner place a four patch layout of two white squares with two white/cream half square triangles.  Note that the two cream triangles form a butterfly shape across the corner.  In the middle of each edge place either a dark blue or a red square.

Add a red square in the middle.  On the top and the left hand side of this central square lay a quarter square triangle made with two dark blue triangles.  On the bottom and right of the central square lay a quarter square triangle with one dark blue triangle and one red triangle.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block at this stage measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them – one for each corner of the quilt.

Central block

Central block

Make the second block

The layout for this block is broadly the same as for the first block.  This time place a blue square in the centre and half way along each edge.  Use dark blue/blue quarter square triangles.  Make sure to place them so that the dark blue triangle always lies on the edge of the central square.  That way you form a dark blue diagonal around each central square.

Sew together as above.  The block measures 15.1/2″ square and you just need to make one for the middle of the quilt.

Third block

Third block

Make the third block

Again, this is very similar to the first two blocks.  Place a blue square in the middle with blue squares on the top and bottom edges of the block.  Add red squares to the two sides.  Use two dark blue/blue quarter square triangles and two dark blue/red quarter square triangles.  Lay these so that the dark blue triangles lie against the central square, the blue triangles are above and below the middle while the two red triangles are on the sides.

Sew together as above.  The block measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make four of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the Providence quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  In row one you need a block one at each end with a block three between them.  Make sure that the blue runs vertically in the middle block and that the dark blue forms the top left corner in the first block or the top right in the third block.

In row two place the block two in the middle with a block three on either side of it.  Make sure that in the blocks at either end the blue runs horizontally while the red runs vertically.

Row three

Row three

For row three you need a block three in the middle with a block one at either end.  Make sure that the blue runs vertically in the middle block and that the dark blue forms the two quilt corners in the end blocks.

Providence quilt border

Providence quilt border

Add the quilt borders

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

I formed the second border with 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue.  You’ll need two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the top and bottom together with two lengths of 53.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Providence quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/nDSmOKeWeOk

For those of you who have been asking, my next demonstration on the Sewing Quarter channel will be on September 24th – one at 9 am and one at 11 am.

Wednesbury Museum Art Gallery

Wednesbury Museum Art Gallery

Last week I took time off to visit the Wednesbury Museum and Art Gallery.  It’s not far from here and I had a lovely time there.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.  I thought that those etchings on the glass would make lovely quilting designs.

Wednesbury Museum Art Gallery

Wednesbury Museum Art Gallery

Wednesbury Museum Art Gallery

The Wednesbury Museum Art Gallery isn’t far from here and I’m glad that I’ve finally been to visit it.  It’s one of the Sandwell & Dudley museums (so it’s free to visit!).  I had a very pleasant hour meandering among the displays – and picking up lots of quilt inspiration.

Ruskin pottery

Ruskin pottery

Ruskin Pottery

I’m ashamed to say that I hadn’t heard of Ruskin Pottery but the display of their pottery was magnificent.  They were famed for the different glazes that they used on their vases and pots.  I would love to pretend to be knowledgeable and tell you which glaze this vase has, but after I had read the label it went straight out of my head.

An array of pottery

An array of pottery

The different glazes that they pioneered included souffle, described by the company as being suggestive of the rich hues seen in rock pools at low tide.  Then there was lustre glaze, giving a pearly sheen, and flambe glaze which gave rich vibrant colours.

Many different products

Many different products

They kept their recipes for the glazes secret and they have never been revealed.  They often involved multiple firings at controlled temperatures.  It was really interesting reading about these gorgeous products.

As you can see from the photo, the company produced many pottery items, not just vases and pots.  The company began in 1898 and was renamed Ruskin in 1902 as a tribute to the writings of John Ruskin.

Chance Glass

Chance Glass

Chance Glass

The next display was of Chance Glass products.  The etched design has been re produced in many quilts – I can’t remember if they are called dahlia or chrysanthemum quilts.  It is definitely on my list of quilts to make.

Chance Glass was renowned for its specialised glass.  At one time their workshops covered 30 acres in Smethwick.  They produced the glass to build the Crystal Palace for the Great Exhibition, as well as the clock faces for Big Ben during one of its previous facelifts.

They provided much of the specialised glass needed for lighthouses around the world.  Apparently they made the glass for a lighthouse in Tasmania (over 300 pieces) and shipped it there without any instructions.  That must have been quite a jigsaw!

Gorgeous colours

Gorgeous colours

Of course, it was the smaller glass items that interested me.  These two items were particularly beautiful.  I wonder if you could adapt the plate to a fussy cut dresden plate design for a quilt.

Community area

Community area

Community area

There was a fascinating community area in the Wednesbury Musetum Art Gallery.  Amongst the artwork was this house which combined painting with stuffed felt shapes to give depth to some of the aspects like roofs and trees.  That could also be adapted to a quilt design.

Racing horses

Racing horses

Then there was this marvellous picture of racing horses.  The streaks behind the horses gave a wonderful feeling of speed – I must try that one day using quilting to give that feeling of motion.

Stained glass technique

Stained glass technique

And finally one more picture that intrigued me.  This is a picture, not a window, but it could be made using black sashing as in stained glass quilts and some free flowing fabric creating the dress.

I hope you’ve enjoyed your trip around the Wendesbury Museum Art Gallery with me – I certainly loved it.

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