Pinwheel Snail Trail Quilt Pattern

Pinwheel snail trail quilt

Pinwheel snail trail quilt

This pinwheel snail trail quilt pattern was quite easy to make and I love the way the design has turned out.  It’s another of those patterns than look quite complex but are quite easy to make.

The quilt measures 40″ square so it would make a good lap quilt or throw.  The blocks are all 12″ square finished size and I made five snail trail blocks with four pinwheel blocks.I’ve used 3/4 yard of lilac, 1 yard of purple and 1/2 yard of green fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the pinwheel snail trail quilt

2.5/8″ squares:  ten purple, ten green

3.7/8″ squares:  fifteen purple, fifteen lilac

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  ten lilac

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty purple

6.7/8″ squares:  eight purple, eight lilac

Cut the four patch units

Cut the four patch units

Make the four patch units

You could make these units by just sewing together two green and two purple 2.5/8″ squares.  I chose to strip piece them to save time.  Sew together a 2.5/8″ strip of purple and of green fabric along the length.  Cut this panel at 2.5/8″ intervals.

Four patch units

Four patch units

Place the resulting strips together in pairs with the purple squares diagonally opposite each other.  Sew the pairs of squares together to create the four patch units for the middle of the block.

Add the purple triangles

Add the purple triangles

First section of the snail trail quilt block

Cut a 3.7/8″ purple and lilac square in half along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square.  Lay two purple triangles on opposite sides of the four patch units and two lilac triangles on the other two sides.  This section should measure 6.1/2″ square.

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a purple and a lilac square with right sides together.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line and you will produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the purple and trim the corners where fabric sticks out.  These are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Snail trail quilt block layout

Snail trail quilt block layout

Complete the snail trail quilt block

The central part of the block is now a square but the four patch in the middle has been turned on point so that it looks like a diamond.  Make sure that the green squares are side by side rather than above and below each other.  Now it is easy to add the remaining patches to complete the layout of the block.  I’ve realised that the main photo of the quilt was taken with the green squares above each other, but that’s just because I must have rotated the quilt before I hung it up for the photo.

Lay a 6.1/2″ lilac rectangle at the beginning of row one.  Place a half square triangle and a 3.1/2″ purple square at the end of the row.  Lay the half square triangle so that the purple is on top with the lilac between it.  Lay a purple square and a half square triangle on either side of the central area.  On the left the square is beneath the half square triangle and together they form a half-house shape.  On the right the square is above the half square triangle and the half-house shape is now upside down.

For the last row place a purple square and half square triangle at the beginning of the row with the remaining lilac rectangle at the end.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  At this stage it measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make five of these.

Alternate block pinwheels

Alternate block pinwheels

Pinwheel alternate block

I have used a simple pinwheel as the alternate block.  Using the 6.7/8″ squares, make half square triangles in exactly the same way as for the smaller squares above.

Lay these out in two pairs so that the colours alternate all the way round – check the photo.  Sew the pairs of squares together and then sew the pairs to each other.  This block also measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make four of these.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the pinwheel snail trail quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Rows one and three are the same as each other:  a snail trail block at each end with a pinwheel in the middle.  Make sure that you keep the green squares side by side across the row.

Row two

Row two

In row two place a pinwheel at each end with a snail trail block in the middle.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

Quilt border

I have used 2.1/2″ green strips for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the pinwheel snail trail quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

https://youtu.be/9SWleUiri3Q

Jewellery Quarter

Jewellery Quarter

Last week I visited the Jewellery Quarter in Birmingham.  It’s a lovely vibrant area of the city with a wealth of history.  To see my photos click here or click on the photo.

I have a very old overlocker which was a basic model even when I bought it many years ago.  This week I have been trying to make scarves and my overlocker has really not been very helpful.  I’ve warned it that I will retire it if it doesn’t behave, but that doesn’t seem to have made any difference.

 

Jewellery Quarter – Birmingham – Photos

Jewellery Quarter

Jewellery Quarter

The Jewellery Quarter in Birmingham has always fascinated me.  This sculpture outside the station shows an enlarged watch mechanism and is very appropriate.  The Jewellery Quarter has been around for a long, long time.  A survey in 1553 named  one of the first goldsmiths in the area – Roger Pemberton if you’re interested!

The whole area is a designated conservation area and English Heritage has described it as a ‘place of unique character’.




Chamberlain clock tower

Chamberlain clock tower

The Jewellery Quarter’s Chamberlain clock tower

This clock tower dominates the area.  It was installed in 1903 in honour of Joseph Chamberlain.  He was MP for the area and worked really hard for the area.  His name crops up remarkably often when I am exploring Birmingham.  There is an interesting history of the jewellery quarter on the Victoria James website.

HSBC bank

HSBC bank

I took a separate photo of the building behind it because I thought it really attractive.  What a lovely building for a bank!  In fact I found myself spoiled for choice in photos of buildings:  there are over 200 listed buildings within the area.  That gives you some idea of what a wonderful area it is to explore.

Pen museum

Pen museum

Museums of the Jewellery Quarter

I tried to visit the English Heritage silver museum, but you have to book in advance for that.  On my walk I passed the Pen Museum which looks huge.  That’s definitely one for a return visit.

Button factory

Button factory

The Button Factory, now a restaurant, gives a flavour of the history of the jewellery quarter.  I waited ages for that white van to move so that I could take this photo, but I gave up in the end.

Warstone Lane Cemetery

Warstone Lane Cemetery

Warstone Lane Cemetery

This cemetery provided an oasis of green right beside the road.  I thought that it was most unusual for it to be so open – not tucked away behind high hedges or walls.  The crocuses in the foreground gave a lovely splash of colour.

The catacombs provide a three storey section which increased the available space for burials.  They have now been bricked up.  Apparently they were originally built because there was a sand pit that needed covering up!

The Jewellery Quarter is well worth a visit and I probably only scratched the surface with the parts that I visited this time.  It certainly is a real gem in the heart of Birmingham.

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