Trip Around the World Quilt Pattern

Trip around the world quilt

Trip around the world quilt

My Trip Around the World quilt is a very simple rectangular quilt.  I have made one before but I’ve had several queries on the pattern recently so I decided that the instructions obviously weren’t as clear as they should be.  I hope that this quilt pattern will remedy that! Plus I feel that this is a much more beautiful quilt.

For this trip around the world quilt I have used bands of colour going from light to dark, slightly larger squares and made a much larger quilt.  I hope that the instructions are also much more clear!  This quilt is made in four quarters which are then joined together with a further strip of squares.

The quilt measures 52.1/2″ by 72.1/2″, using 1/2 yard each of yellow, dark yellow, orange and red fabrics with 1 yard of purple and 1.1/2 yards of white fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the trip around the world quilt

Cut four 3″ strips across the width of fabric in each of the six fabrics.

For the borders you will need a further eleven 3″ strips of white and six 3″ strips of purple fabric.

Please note that all these strips are 3″ cut size, giving 2.1/2″ finished size.

Sew 6 strips of fabric into panels

Sew 6 strips of fabric into panels

Make the tubes of fabric

Sew one strip of each fabric together in a panel fading from dark to light.  Make four of these.  Cut these panels in half so that you have eight panels – each one 15.1/2″ by roughly 21″.

Press the seam allowances in alternate directions

Press the seam allowances in alternate directions

Press the seam allowances in alternate directions across each panel.  In the photo you can see that alternate seam allowances point up while the others point down.  This means that you can nest the seam allowances together when you sew strips to each other.  It makes for a much neater quilt.

Create a tube of fabric

Create a tube of fabric

Place two panels with right sides together, making sure that the purple strip of one panel lies against the white of the other panel.  Sew a seam across the top and the bottom of each pair of panels, joining the white and purple strips to each other at top and at bottom only.

This will create a tube of fabric about 21″ long and containing twelve strips of fabric.  These tubes are open at each end.

Cut the tubes into loops

Cut the tubes into loops

Cut the strips of fabric

Now you need to cut each tube of fabric at 3″ intervals.  This creates individual loops which are 3″ wide and contain twelve squares.  You need to cut seven loops from each tube.  Each quarter of the quilt is made with six loops and the remaining four loops make sashing to join the quarters together.

Unpick one seam to create a strip

Unpick one seam to create a strip

First quarter of the trip around the world quilt

For this section I have begun the layout from the right hand side and worked towards the left.  I wanted to be sure that the middle of the quilt looked as I wanted it to.  Make each strip by unpicking the seam between two of the squares.

For the first strip (right hand side) unpick the seam between light yellow and white.  Place this strip with yellow at the bottom and white at the top.  In this quarter I want the colours to move downwards from top right to bottom left.  So in the second strip unpick the seam between dark yellow and light yellow.  Place the strip with dark yellow at the bottom.    The third strip needs to have orange at the bottom, so unpick the seam between orange and red.  Continue with the rest of the six strips.  Always hold the tube against the strip next to it to check that the colours are moving correctly before you unpick the seam.

Sew the six strips to each other to complete the first quarter of the trip around the world quilt.  Make two of these.  One will form the top left quarter of the quilt and the other will form the bottom right section.

Second quarter

Second quarter

Make the second quarter

In this quarter I have placed the strips from left to right, so that again I am moving from the middle towards the edge.  The photo shows the completed first quarter on the left and then the first strips of the second quarter on the left.

Begin with a strip that has light yellow at the bottom.  Yes, this is the same as the nearest strip of the first quarter!  The idea now is that the colours move down from top left to bottom right, so you have the same strips but placed in the reverse order.  Unpick the second strip of this quarter so that dark yellow is at the bottom, then orange and continue with red, purple and white to mirror the first quarter.

Sew the strips to each other to complete the second quarter.  Make two of these.  They will form the top left and bottom right sections of the quilt.

Place sashing vertically between the sections

Place sashing vertically between the sections

Assemble the trip around the world quilt

Lay the four quarters out as shown.  The first panels are diagonally opposite each other, as are the second panels.  Rotate them so that the light yellow squares are always in the middle.

You should have four loops left over.  Place one of these between the top two sections.  Unpick the seam between white and purple so that the white square is at the bottom, between the two light yellow squares.  Repeat with another strip between the bottom two sections.

Sew the panels together across each half of the quilt.

Add the horizontal sashing

Add the horizontal sashing

Add the sashing between the half sections

You now have two half sections of the quilt.  Each one of these measures 30.1/2″ long by 33″ wide.  Now you need to make the sashing to join the two halves together.

Take the remaining two loops and place them between the two sections.  Unpick the seam of the left hand loop between purple and red so that the purple square will be the centre of the row.  You need seven squares only, so also unpick the seam after the next purple square so that the strip will run from purple to purple.  The leftover squares will be used in the second border.

Unpick the other loop between purple and white so that you can place a white square next to the purple of the first strip.  You need six squares only so unpick the other end after the purple.

Sew the halves together

Sew the halves together

Sew the two sections of the sashing together to create one strip and then sew the halves of the quilt to the sashing.  Your quilt top should now measure 32.1/2″ by 62.1/2″.

Add the first border

Add the first border

Add the first border

The first border runs down the sides of the quilt only.  Make two strips of white 3″ wide by 62.1/2″ long and sew one to each side of the quilt.

The second border

Use up the leftover squares

Use up the leftover squares

In the second border I wanted to use up the remaining few squares left of the loops.  This border also runs down the sides of the quilt only.  Unpick the seams so that you have two strips running from red to light yellow.

Make four white strips 3″ by 26.1/2″ long.  Sew one on each side of each set of squares.

Pin the squares in place

Pin the squares in place

Attach one to each side of the quilt.

In order to be sure that the squares remained in the middle of the quilt, I pinned them in place first and then smoothed the white to the ends.  The seam between dark yellow and orange should lie half way across the purple square at the middle of the edge of the quilt.

The third border

This border is the first one to run all the way round the quilt.  I wanted to enclose the squares in the second border to make them stand out.  Cut two 3″ lengths of white fabric 62.1/2″ long.  Sew these to the sides of the quilt.  Cut two 3″ lengths of white 49.1/2″ long and sew these to the top and bottom of the quilt.

Add the fourth border

Add the fourth border

The final border of the trip around the world quilt

Finally!  I made the fourth and last border with 3″ strips of purple fabric to give a strong frame to the quilt.  Cut two lengths of 67.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.  Then add two lengths of 54.1/2″ to the top and bottom.

That completes the trip around the world quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Rutland Water

Rutland Water

Last week I had lunch with some old friends – obviously by ‘old’ I mean long standing rather than ancient!  They took me to see Rutland Water which was fascinating.  It’s one of the largest man made lakes in Europe and was made by building a dam across the Gwash Valley.  It was only completed in 1975 so is relatively new but the area has been beautifully developed as a nature reserve and water sports centre.

There is a track for walking around the lake, but as it’s about 27 miles we didn’t attempt that.

 

Sunshine Shadow Quilt Pattern

Sunshine shadow quilt

Sunshine shadow quilt

The sunshine shadow quilt pattern is more often made using a trip around the world technique – that means making strips of squares, sewing them in a loop and then breaking into the loop at different stages to make the design.  It’s a simple enough way of making a quilt, but you have to concentrate to make sure that you always break into the loop at the right place.  After I had made the trip around the world quilt I was asked quite often how to make it larger.  So that started me thinking about a way of making the sunshine shadow quilt that could be easily made smaller or larger without too much effort – I’m all for the easy life.  I tried making a block and to my relief it worked:  you can make this quilt using just one quilt block, rotating it to form the design, and you can make it whatever size you want by just making more or less blocks.




This particular sunshine shadow quilt measures 76″ wide by 100″ long, using 1.1/2 yards each of red, orange, light blue, cream and white with 2 yards of dark blue fabric.  I have used forty eight blocks which are all 12″ square finished size.  Although there are three pairings of fabric (red and orange, dark blue and light blue, cream and white), I haven’t actually set them out as dark, light, dark, light.  I preferred the overall effect by placing the colours the way that you see them.  As ever, you can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.

Sunshine shadow quilt block

Sunshine shadow quilt block

Cutting requirements for the sunshine shadow quilt

2.1/2″ squares:  288 each in all six colours

For the border you will need 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue:  two at 72.1/2″ long and two at 100.1/2″ long.

Making the sunshine shadow quilt block

You can use a certain amount of speed piecing to help, but you do also need individual squares.

Sew some of the fabric strips in pairs

Sew some of the fabric strips in pairs

So I sewed some of the 2.1/2″ strips of fabric together in pairs and left the others to be cut into individual squares.  For both the pairs of strips and the individual strips of fabric I have cut at 2.1/2″ intervals to create pairs of squares or individual squares.

Sunshine shadow quilt block layout

Sunshine shadow quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in six rows of six.  The red squares form one diagonal.  Above them are light blue, dark blue white, cream and then orange squares.  Because the orange square is in last position in row 1, it is then placed in first position in row 2, second position in row 3 and so on down the diagonal.  The cream square is in last position in row 2 so it is then placed in first position in row 3 and then follows the diagonal line.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.  Make forty eight of these.

Assembling the sunshine shadow quilt

Rows 1 to 4

Rows 1 to 4

Lay the squares out in eight rows of six blocks.  Rows one to four are all the same as each other:  for the first three blocks the red diagonal goes up from bottom left to top right while for the second three blocks the red diagonal goes down from top left to bottom right.  There are in fact two ways that the block can be placed while still keeping the red diagonal in the same line, so just check that for the first three blocks you have the light blue square in the top left of the block while in the second three blocks the top right square is the light blue.

Rows 5 to 8

Rows 5 to 8

Rows 5 to 8 are also the same as each other, but with the red diagonals going in the opposite direction to those in the first four rows.  This time you want the top right square in each of the first three blocks to be orange, while the top left square should be orange in each of the remaining blocks.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of the dark blue fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 100.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the sunshine shadow quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

I hope that you’ll agree that this is a quick and easy way of making such an eyecatching quilt.  I know that the true trip around the world quilt pattern has an extra row and column forming a cross in the middle, but I have tried to keep this quilt as easy and straightforward as possible.

Square sunshine shadow quilt

Square sunshine shadow quilt

In order to make it larger or smaller you need to add or substract blocks from both the sides or from both top and bottom – you need to have an even number of rows and columns in order to keep the design symmetrical.

In this version I have used sixty four blocks laid out in eight rows of eight blocks.  The final quilt is 100″ square.

Here’s the video:

I’m having some work done in the house next week so it looks like being a hectic week.  I’ve had to spend the last few days tidying my fabric away so that it isn’t exposed to builders’ dust – but it will be worth it!

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