Towers of Camelot Quilt – Free Pattern

Towers of Camelot quilt

Towers of Camelot quilt

The Towers of Camelot quilt block is also known as Air Castles.  It’s the quarter square triangles that form that make you think of turrets and castles.  There are three techniques needed for each block, but once you have made these the quilt block goes together really quickly as a simple nine patch.  Each step is simple – trust me!

I’ve made it as a rectangular quilt as I’ve been told that I make too many square quilts.  It measures 60″ by 78″, using twelve 18″ square finished size blocks.  The quilt used 1.1/4 yards of turquoise, 2 yards of white and 2.3/4 yards of blue fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.  If you visit the online shop, you’ll find that all payments are now through Paypal, but you don’t have to have a Paypal account – you can buy as a guest using your card in the normal way.




Cutting requirements for the Towers of Camelot quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

6.7/8″ squares:  twenty turquoise, twenty white, twenty blue

7.1/4″ squares:  ten blue, ten white

4.3/4″ squares: ten white

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty turquoise

13.1/4″ squares:  two blue

9.7/8″ squares:  four white

For the binding you will need to cut eight 3.1/2″ strips of blue across the width of fabric

Make the half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Use the 6.7/8″ squares in turquoise and white only for the half square triangle units.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangles which are now 6.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the turquoise and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make quarter square triangle units

Make quarter square triangle units

Make the quarter square triangle units

First you need to make half square triangles as above using the 7.1/4″ blue and white squares.  This produces half square triangle units which are 6.7/8″ squares.

Place a blue 6.7/8″ square right sides together with one of the blue/white half square triangles.  Line up the edges and mark a line along the diagonal that crosses the other seam – make sure that your two seams won’t both run along the same diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces a quarter square triangle unit made up of one large blue triangle, one small blue triangle and one small white triangle.  These are now 6.1/2″ squares.

Make the diamond in a square units

Make the diamond in a square

Make the diamond in a square

The central section of the Towers of Camelot quilt block is a white diamond in a turquoise square.  Cut the 3.7/8″ turquoise squares along one diagonal to make two triangles.  Place one triangle on each edge of the 4.3/4″ white square.  I know the square doesn’t look very white in the photo, but it was a dull day when I took the photos.

Sew the top and bottom triangles to the square and then press them open.  Next sew the two triangles to the sides and press them open.  Trim the edges of the resulting square as the fabric from the triangle tips sticks out in the middle of each edge.

For each block you need four half square triangle units, four quarter square triangle units and one diamond in a square.

Towers of Camelot quilt block layout

Towers of Camelot quilt block layout

Make the towers of Camelot quilt block

Lay the sections out in three rows of three.  Place a diamond in a square unit with a quarter square triangle unit on each edge and a half square triangle in each corner.  Sew the sections together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

You need to make ten of these blocks.

Make the alternate block

Alternate block layout

Alternate block layout

This block is another diamond in a square, but using much larger pieces.

Cut the 9.7/8″ squares along one diagonal to make triangles.  Place one triangle on each edge of the blue 13.1/4″ square.  Sew the top and bottom triangles to the square first.  Press these open and then sew the side triangles to the square.  Trim the edges of the block to remove the triangle tips in the middle of each edge.

Make two of the alternate blocks.

Rows 1 and 4

Rows 1 and 4

Assemble the Towers of Camelot quilt

Lay the blocks out in four rows of three blocks.

Rows one and four are made with three towers blocks side by side.

For rows two and three place an alternate block in the middle with a towers block on either side.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt binding

Add the quilt binding

Add the quilt binding

I have used 3.1/2″ strips of blue fabric for the binding.  You’ll need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Towers of Camelot quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Colour through quilting

Colour through quilting

Yesterday I went to Malvern for the Stitch and Craft show. The quilting section was larger than I had expected, with some gorgeous quilts on display.

This one was a black background with all the colour coming from the quilting – very impressive.

It was lovely bumping into (not literally) quilters who knew me through the website – thanks for saying hello.

Landscape quilts

Landscape quilts

These landscape quilts were incredibly realistic.  The one on the right was amazingly detailed with all the branches interlocking in both the top and in the reflection.

I do so admire the attention to detail shown by these quilters.  It inspired me to take a walk in the Malvern hills afterwards.  I think that I took a wrong turn somewhere and ended up on a much longer walk than I had expected.  As it was such a lovely sunny day that wasn’t really a problem.

Judy Niemeyer quilt pattern

Judy Niemeyer quilt pattern

There were several quilts made from Judy Niemeyer patterns.  Her quilts have always impressed me, so it was really exciting to see some of them in the flesh.

I finished with a quick walk around the town of Malvern, sampling the famous spring water from a tap in the street. Altogether a marvellous day out.

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