Tippecanoe Quilt – Free Pattern

Tippecanoe quilt

Tippecanoe quilt

The Tippecanoe quilt is a little different from my usual in that you need  to use templates, but it is still a very easy quilt to make.  It seems that the tippecanoe quilt block is named for an 1811 battle in Indiana, America.

I have made the quilt 40″ square – a decent size for a lap quilt pattern.  I used thirty six blocks, all 6″ square finished size.  The fabric requirements are 1/4 yard each of yellow and medium blue, 1/2 yard each of brown and light blue, with 3/4 yard of dark blue.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the Tippecanoe quilt

6.1/2″ squares:  eight light blue, six medium blue and six dark blue

tippecanoe templates:  sixteen of each template

For the border you will need to cut four 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue across the width of fabric.

First template

Second template

I apologise for the two templates being separate, but I couldn’t work out how to make them into one document.

Print and cut out the templates

Print and cut out the templates

Cut the patchwork pieces

You can print the templates here and here.  The dark line is the sewing line and the outer dotted line is the cutting line.  I find it best to label each template with the fabric colour as well, just to avoid confusion as you cut the pieces.

Cut the yellow triangles

Cut the yellow triangles

From the yellow fabric cut 7.3/8″ strips of fabric across the width.  Lay the template on the fabric with the base of the triangle in line with the edge of the fabric.  Make two cuts for the sides of the triangle and then you just need to clip the corners.

If you line the base of the triangle with first the bottom and then the top of the fabric you can cut the maximum number of triangles from each strip of fabric.

Cut the large brown triangles

Cut the large brown triangles

For the brown large triangles use 3.5/8″ strips of brown fabric.  If you cut your templates from fabric folded in half, as it comes from the shop, you’ll find that you get both triangles from one template.

Cut the small triangles

Cut the small triangles

Finally for the small brown triangle I used 3.7/8″ strips of brown fabric because that’s what EQ7 suggested.  I think that I could probably have cut them from the same 3.5/8″ strips that I used for the larger triangles.

You need to cut sixteen of each template piece.

Add the small triangle

Add the small triangle

Make the tippecanoe quilt block

Sew the small triangle to the base of the yellow triangle.  Press with the seam alllowance away from the yellow.

Add the side triangles

Add the side triangles

Add the side triangles one at a time, pressing the first triangle open before adding the second.  The progression in the photo goes down the left hand side and then down the right hand side.

Trim the edges to straighten the sides.  The block now measures 6.1/2″ square and you need to make sixteen of these.

Cut 6.1/2″ squares of light, medium and dark blue.  You need eight light blue, six medium blue and six dark blue.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the tippecanoe quilt

Sew the blocks together in six rows of six.  Make the first row with a pair of tippecanoe blocks in the middle and one at each end.  Place light blue squares in the remaining two spaces.  Note the direction of the yellow triangles.  At each end of the row they point towards the corner of the quilt.  In the middle the first yellow triangle points to bottom left while the second one points to top right.

Row two

Row two

Rows two and five are both made with blue squares only.  Make row 2 with light, dark medium, dark, medium, light blue squares.  The layout for row five is slightly different:  light, medium dark, medium, dark light.

The idea is for the medium and dark blue squares to alternate around the central section.

Row three

Row three

Rows three and four contain the same blocks as each other.  In row three place a tippecanoe block at each end and two in the middle.  The yellow triangles point to top left in the first, third and sixth blocks.  In the fourth block it points to top right.  Place a medium blue square in second position and dark blue in the fifth.

Row four

Row four

Last three rows

Lay the same blocks out for the fourth row.  This time the yellow triangles point to bottom right in the first, fourth and sixth positions.  The triangle in the third position points to bottom left.  Place the dark blue square in the second position and the medium blue in fifth position.

Row six

Row six

Row six contains the same blocks as row one but the yellow triangles are placed in different directions.  At each end they point down towards the corners of the quilt.  In the middle pair the yellow triangle points first to bottom left and then to top right.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Finish the quilt

Sew the blocks together in rows and then sew the rows to each other.

For the border I’ve used 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue.  You need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Tippecanoe quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Quilting on Minnie

Quilting on Minnie

Last week I mentioned that I had finally sorted out Minnie, my longarm quilting machine.  Well, I’ve begun quilting the Plaid quilt on her.  I can’t tell you how good it felt to finally get going.  Naturally, I was also hugely relieved that it went so well.

I had been very nervous that after the move I might have some of the problems with tension (mine and hers!) that I’d had when I first bought her, but it all went really smoothly.

I had picked up some pretty tartan fabric in the rag market and I’m using that for the backing.  It’s brushed cotton so it should make the quilt feel nice and warm to curl up in.

%d bloggers like this: