Times Remembered Quilt Pattern

Times remembered quilt

Times remembered quilt

I chose the Times Remembered quilt block for this quilt because that’s what I always find myself doing at the start of a new year – taking a glance back at the previous year.  Whether or not you do the same, I hope that you thoroughly enjoyed your festive break and will have a wonderful new year.

The Star and Cross block is my choice for an alternative.  I’m quite pleased with the way that it forms a circle around the central area of the quilt.  There are sixteen blocks – eight of each – and they are all 15″ square finished size.  Altogether I used 1/2 yard of dark blue, 3/4 yard of medium blue, 1.1/4 yards of light blue, 1.1/2 yards each of red and white fabrics.  The quilt measures 66″ square.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the times remembered quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  forty dark blue, forty eight medium blue, thirty two light blue for the times remembered blocks,  together with forty eight white and sixty four light blue for the star and cross quilt

3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  eight medium blue, eight red for the times block, together with eight white for the star block

3.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in red and white for the times block, together with thirty two each in light blue and white for the star block

For the border you will need seven 2.1/2″ strips of red cut across the width of fabric.

Making half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

I’ve used 3.7/8″ squares for the half square triangles, in the colour pairings listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.

Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Times remembered quilt block layout

Times remembered quilt block layout

Make the times remembered quilt block

Lay the patchwork pieces out as shown in the photo.  Place a dark blue square in each corner and in the middle.  Add a light blue square on each edge of the central square and a red/white half square triangle in each corner of that central area.  Place these so that the white triangles are on the outside, forming the corners of that area.

For the outer frame you need a medium blue rectangle at the top, a red rectangle at the bottom and three medium blue squares on each side.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  Make eight of them.

Star and cross quilt block layout

Star and cross quilt block layout

Make the star and cross quilt block

Lay the patchwork out as shown.  Form the central cross with a white rectangle in row three and a white square above and below it.  Place a white square in each corner of the block, with a blue/white half square triangle forming a butterfly shape across each corner.

Place a light blue square in the middle of each edge of the block.  Add the remaining light blue squares diagonally inside each white corner square.

Sew the squares together across each row and sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  Make eight of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the times remembered quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  In row one place two star blocks in the middle with a times block at each end of the row.  Place these so that the red rectangles are at the bottom of the blocks.

Row two

Row two

The second row is made with two times blocks in the middle and a star block at each end.  Place the times blocks so that the red rectangle is first on the right and then on the bottom of the blocks.

Row three

Row three

For the third row the blocks are the same as for the second row, but this time the red rectangles are first on the top and then on the left of the blocks.  This is how the cross in the centre of the quilt is formed.

Row four

Row four

Finally the fourth row comprises two star blocks in the middle with a times block at each end.  Rotate the times blocks so that the red rectangles are at the top of the blocks.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

I’ve used 3.1/2″ strips of red for the quilt border.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 66.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Times Remembered quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Earlswood lakes

Earlswood lakes

I’ve had a very relaxing break.  While my sewing machine was carefully tidied away I took lots of lovely walks.  One in particular to Earlswood Lakes gave me some gorgeous scenes of the sun shining on the water:  sometimes my camera just shows this as a blur, but for some reason this time it showed the sun’s reflection beautifully.  I think that I’ll have to try and use this particular photo as the basis of a quilt.

Holly's vest

Holly’s vest

In addition I wanted to share with you a baby vest that I adapted for my granddaughter, Holly.  It was very simple to make – I added some text to a photo of Christmas fabric and then printed it on plain fabric.  I sewed that and a holly shape on to the vest, giving a festive vest.  It was a really simple way of personalising a gift for her.

Kansas Beauty Star Quilt Pattern

Kansas Beauty star quilt

Kansas Beauty star quilt

The Kansas Beauty Star quilt is based on the Kansas Beauty quilt block, but I have used three different colour variations to form a star design on the quilt.

I have used nine 16″ square finished size blocks.

The quilt measures 52″ square and I have used 1/4 yard of yellow star fabric, 1/2 yard each of light blue and dark blue, 3/4 yard of white and 1.1/2 yards of red fabric.  There are nine 16″ finished size blocks.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

For those of you who have pointed out that the star looks like a swastiks, I apologise.  I did not see the likeness and I certainly meant no offence.  This is what Wikipedia says about the shape:

It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in contemporary religious cultures such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism and dates back at least 11,000 years.



Completed Kansas beauty star quilt blocks

Completed Kansas beauty star quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the Kansas beauty star quilt

4.1/2″ squares:  nine white

3.3/8″ squares:  seventy two red, thirty six white

5.1/4″ squares:  nine red, cut along both diagonals to make four triangles

8.7/8″ squares:  four yellow, six light blue, eight dark blue, cut along one diagonal to make two triangles

For the border you will need five 2.1/2″ red strips cut across the width of fabric.

Make diamond in a square blocks

Make diamond in a square blocks

Making the diamond in a square central section

Begin with a 4.1/2″ white square and on each edge of it place a red triangle cut from the 5.1/4″ red squares (cut along both diagonals to make four triangles).  Sew the top and bottom triangles on first, press them open and then add the triangles to the sides of the square.  The progression of making the block starts in the top left photo of the photo and then follows three columns till you get to the diamond in a square in the bottom right of the photo.

Press and trim the middle of each edge where the triangle tips stick out.

Add a frame to this section

Layout of central area

Layout of central area

The next part of the quilt block layout is common to all nine of the blocks – it’s only the outer triangles where I have used the colour variations.

Place the diamond in a square in the middle and surround it with red and white 3.3/8″ squares.  Each edge of this frame is made with one red, one white and then two red squares.  If you begin at the top left and follow the squares round in a clockwise direction, you’ll see that each edge follows the same pattern.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the squares together across the top and bottom rows.  Join the two pairs of squares either side of the diamond in a square together so that you can sew the middle section together in one row.  Now sew the three rows to each other.  You need to make nine of these sections.

Add triangles to the edges

Add triangles to the edges

Final frame of the Kansas beauty quilt block

Cut the 8.7/8″ squares along one diagonal to make two triangles from each square.  Now make further diamond in a square blocks using the red and white central sections for the diamonds.

Follow the same technique as above, adding two triangles at a time.  Press the first two triangles open and then sew the remaining two triangles in place.  You need to make four blocks with the colours as shown – two triangles of dark blue and two of star fabric.

In addition, make one block with only light blue triangles and make four more with two light blue and two dark blue triangles.  See the photo near the top of the page for the layouts.

Row 1

Row 1

Assemble the Kansas beauty star quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  In row one place a star/dark blue block in the middle with a dark blue/light blue block at each end.  Notice that the dark blue triangles are placed so that they form two larger dark blue triangles pointing downwards.  This means that you have light blue triangles in these top corners of the quilt.

Row 2

Row 2

In row two place the single light blue block in the middle with a dark blue/star block on each end.  Place these so that the star fabric triangles are on either side of the central block, with the dark blue triangles on the outer edges.

Row 3

Row 3

Use the remaining three blocks in the third row.  The dark blue/star block in the middle is placed with the star triangles at the top.  The two light blue/dark blue blocks on the edges are placed so that the dark blue triangles form two larger triangles at the bottom, pointing towards the middle row.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Kansas beauty star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Lantern festival horse and carriage

Lantern festival horse and carriage

Last week I told you that I was going to the Magic Lantern Festival in the Botanical Gardens.  We were lucky enough to have a lovely dry and mild night for it.  The lanterns were amazing!  They had fitted so many scenes into a relatively small area.

lantern festival toadstools

lantern festival toadstools

They even had a model of the Birminghm bull, but my photo of that didn’t come out very well, so I’m showing you some magic toadstools instead.

Where did my body go?

Where did my body go?

Then at the weekend, as part of my whirlwind runup to Christmas, my daughter and I went to Edinburgh.  What a beautiful city.  I’ll show you more photos of it after Christmas, but for now I couldn’t resist showing you where I was beheaded in in the Camera Obscura building.  As you will have already guessed, it’s all done with mirrors.

So now it just remains for me to wish you a very Merry Christmas.  I hope that you have a wonderful festive season leading up to a happy, prosperous and healthy new year.  Thank you for letting me share with you throughout this last year.

I won’t be sending out a quilt pattern next Friday – the next one will be Friday 6th January 2017.

California Oakleaf Star Quilt

California oakleaf star quilt

California oakleaf star quilt

I’ve made the California oakleaf star quilt using the block of the same name with a simple alternate block which causes a star to form when the blocks are sewn together.  It’s a nice easy quilt to make – I’m sure that you are all as busy as I am in the runup to Christmas.

The quilt measures 52″ square and I used 1.3/4 yards each of purple and gold, together with 3/4 yard of white fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.  Incidentally, this quilt also looks good made up in red, white and blue.  The blocks are all 14″ square finished size and you need to make five California oakleaf blocks and four alternate blocks.

I’d love to hear from anyone who lives in California – do your oakleaves look any different from those elsewhere?




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the California oakleaf star quilt

2.1/2″ squares:  eighty purple, twenty gold, forty five white

2.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ rectangles:  one hundred each in purple and white – but read the pattern before you cut these as they are simple to make using strip piecing

7.7/8″ squares:  eight purple, eight gold

For the borders you will need ten 2.1/2″ strips of gold cut across the width of fabric and five 1.1/2″ strips of purple cut across the width of fabric.

Make the California oakleaf corners

Sew together strips of purple and white

Sew together strips of purple and white

Make the strip pieced squares first.  The simplest way to make these is to sew together 1.1/2″ strips of white and purple.  Press the seam allowance towards the purple and cut at 2.1/2″ intervals.  This will give you 2.1/2″ squares made of a purple and a white rectangle.  It’s much quicker and less fiddly to make them this way.

Layout of the corners

Layout of the corners

The corners of this block are made with a simple nine patch block.  There’s a purple square in each corner, a gold square in the middle and one of the purple/white squares on each edge of the central square.  These are placed so that the purple rectangle is on the inside, lying against the gold square, and the white is on the outside.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  You need to make four of these for each California oakleaf block, which means making twenty of them altogether.

California oakleaf quilt block layout

California oakleaf quilt block layout

Full layout of the block

Now you can assemble the entire block.  Between each pair of corners there are two white squares and one purple/white square.  There’s a white square in the middle:  the purple/white squares are all placed so that the purple rectangles surround the central square.

Make three rows

Make three rows

Sew together the three squares that make each spur of the central cross.  You can then sew the pieces together to make three rows and finally sew the three rows to each other to complete the California oakleaf quilt block.  Make five of these.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the alternate quilt block

For this block you need to make half square triangles with the 7.7/8″ squares.  Place a purple and a gold square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 7.1/2″ squares.

Alternate block layout

Alternate block layout

Lay these out as a four patch unit.  Place them so that the two gold triangles together form larger gold triangles, and so do the purple squares.  Sew the pairs together and then sew the pairs to each other to complete the alternate block.  Make four of these.

Rows 1 and 3

Rows 1 and 3

Assembling the California oakleaf star quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Rows one and three are made with a California oakleaf block at each end and an alternate block in the middle.  Place the alternate block so that the purple is top and bottom with the gold on the sides.

Row 2

Row 2

Make row two with an alternate block at each end and a California oakleaf block in the middle.  This time place the alternate  blocks so that the purple is on the sides and the gold is top and bottom.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

Add the borders

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of gold.  You’ll need two lengths of 42.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 46.1/2″ for the sides.

Make the second border using 1.1/2″ strips of purple.  Piece two lengths of 46.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally for the third border you’ll need 2.1/2″ strips of gold again.  Two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the top and bottom.

That completes the California oakleaf star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Harborne clock tower

Harborne clock tower

The suburb nearest to where I live is called Harborne and it is dominated by a building which seems incredibly tall for what it is – a clock tower.  The building used to be a school till the 1960’s but is now mainly restaurants.  I’m guessing that the playground used to be where the car park is now.

Apparently the name Harborne is thought to come from the Old English horu burna, meaning dirty stream, although Harborne was considered a health resort at one time.  It was fascinating reading about Harborne’s history – I’m rather ashamed that I haven’t yet done the same for Quinton itself!

Craftsy

Stars and Blocks Quilt Pattern

Stars and blocks quilt

Stars and blocks quilt

For the Stars and Blocks quilt I have taken one fairly simple star block and rotated only the corner squares of the block to give an alternate block.  I’m thrilled with the result – plenty to look at within the design.

I have used nine 18″ finished size blocks, giving a quilt that is 58″ square.  This is one that can easily be made bigger by using more columns or rows of blocks.

In making the quilt I used 2 yards of purple, 1.1/2 yards of green and 1 yard of white fabric.  As usual, you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the stars and blocks quilt

6.7/8″ squares:  eighteen white, eighteen purple

6.1/2″ squares:  nine green

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six purple

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty six purple, thirty six green

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units with both the 3.7/8″ squares and the 6.7/8″ squares.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along one diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are either 3.1/2″ or 6.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the dark fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Central area for both blocks

Central area for both blocks

Make the first stars and blocks quilt block

The central area of the stars and blocks quilt block is the same for both blocks.  Place a 6.1/2″ green square in the middle with a pair of purple/green half square triangles on each edge of the square.  Place these so that the purple triangles together form a larger purple triangle pointing towards the middle.

Complete layout for first block

Complete layout for first block

Now add the outer frame of the block:  a purple rectangle outside each pair of half square triangles and a large purple/white half square triangle in each corner.  Note that these are placed so that the white triangle is always on the outside, forming the corner of the block.

First you need to sew the small half square triangles together in pairs and sew the purple rectangles to each pair.  This will make them into 6.1/2″ squares.  Now sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  Make five of this version of the block.

Alternate block partially sewn

Alternate block partially sewn

Make the alternate stars and blocks quilt block

For the alternate block, rotate the half square triangles in the corners so that the purple is on the outside, forming the corners of the block.

Apart from that the layout is the same as for the first block – it always amazes me how much you can change the look of a block just by changing the corners!

As before, sew the small half square triangle sections together first then sew the squares together across each row and sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  You need to make four of this version of the block.

Rows 1 and 3

Rows 1 and 3

Assembling the stars and blocks quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Rows 1 and 3 are the same as each other, with a block with white corners at each end of the row and a block with purple corners in the middle.  Sorry – I forgot to take this photo before I sewed the blocks together.

Row 2

Row 2

Row 2 is made with a block with purple corners at each end of the row and a block with white corners in the middle.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows together.

Add the border

Add the border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of the green fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the stars and blocks quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Weoley Castle ruins

Weoley Castle ruins

There’s an area quite near where I live called Weoley Castle.  I’d always just assumed that it was a name given to the area many centuries ago for long forgotten reasons.  So I was surprised (and pleased) to find that there is actually a Weoley Castle – well, the ruins of one – just a couple of miles from where I live.

It’s actually classified as a fortified manor house and was built in the late thirteenth century by the Lords of Dudley.  At one time it was set in a 1,000 acre deer park, although now the ruins are preserved in the small field that you can see in the photo.




Crossbow Star Quilt Pattern

Crossbow star quilt

Crossbow star quilt

The crossbow star quilt block is one of my own design.  The cross formed with the light blue fabric just made me think of a crossbow, and of course the dark blue gives a star design.  I added the purple in to give more interest.  The quilt measures 58″ square and I have made it with nine 18″ square finished size blocks.

I have used 1/2 yard of dark blue, 1 yard of purple, 1.1/4 yards of light blue and 1.3/4 yard of white fabric.

Cutting requirements for the crossbow star quilt

Completed crossbow star quilt block

Completed crossbow star quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty six light blue

3.7/8″ squares:  seventy two each in light blue and white, thirty six each in purple and white, thirty six each in dark blue and white

For the border you will need six 2.1/2″ strips of purple, cut across the width of fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units with the 3.7/8″ squares in the colour combinations listed above.  Place a white square with one of the coloured squares, right sides together, and mark a line along the diagonal.  Then sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances away from the white and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the crossbow star quilt block

Crossbow star quilt block layout

Crossbow star quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in six rows of six.  My apologies that the dark blue doesn’t show up as well in the photo as it does in real life.

Broadly, in the first and sixth rows you have two pairs of light blue/white half square triangles forming larger light blue triangles pointing away from the middle.  In the middle of these rows are two purple/white half square triangles forming a larger purple triangle pointing towards the middle.

In the second and fifth rows there there’s a pair of dark blue/white half square triangles in the middle, forming a larger white triangle pointing towards the middle.  On each side of this there’s a light blue square and then a light blue/white half square triangle.

The third and fourth rows are each made with a pair of light blue/white half square triangles in the middle of each row, placed to form a white diamond in the middle of the block.  On either side of this central diamond there’s a dark blue/white half square triangle with a purple/white half square triangle on the edge of the block.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the crossbow star quilt block.  Make nine of these.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Assembling the crossbow star quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of purple fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the crossbow star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

I’ve had a thoroughly self indulgent week – I had a free cinema ticket to use up so I went to see the film BFG – a lovely bit of escapism.  Then on Wednesday I went to see the musical Sunny Afternoon – the story of the Kinks.  It was the first time I had been to this particular theatre and both it and the show were real treats.  Now I feel fully energised and ready to make a start on my Christmas sewing.

Starbright Medallion Quilt Pattern

Starbright medallion quilt

Starbright medallion quilt

The Starbright Medallion quilt uses the starbright quilt block for the central medallion, surrounded by three different borders.  In case you hadn’t come across the term before, a medallion quilt is simply one that is built up with frames around the centrepiece (the medallion) so you are working from the middle outwards rather than sewing blocks together in rows, which is more common.

The quilt measures 48″ square and I have used 1/2 yard of red fabric with 1 yard each of blue, turquoise and white fabrics.  You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the starbright medallion quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  sixteen white, eight blue

3.7/8″ squares:  four each in turquoise and white, four each in blue and turquoise, twelve each in blue and white

2.1/2″ squares:  ninety six turquoise, twenty four red

2.7/8″ squares:  forty eight red, forty eight turquoise

For border 1 you will need four 3.1/2″ white strips cut across the width of fabric

For border 3 you will need five 3.1/2″ blue strips cut across the width of fabric

Making block 1 for the starbright quilt block

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ square either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

The medallion area is most easy to make in four quarters.  For this you will need to make two each of two different but similar blocks.

First block for the medallion

First block for the medallion

Lay the patchwork pieces out in four rows of four.  There are three white squares in the top right hand corner.  One diagonal is made with white, blue, white, blue squares.  The rest of the block is half square triangles.  These are always placed so that the white triangles are together, forming larger white triangles pointing away from the edge.  Look for the larger shapes:  two triangles together forming a stripe of either blue or turquoise, two rosebud shapes formed with a blue square and two blue triangles.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  You need to make two of this block.

Layout for second block

Layout for second block

Making block 2 for the starbright block

This block uses exactly the same pieces as the block above, but just arranged differently to form a mirror image of the first block.  This time the three white squares are on the top left hand side of the block and the diagonal of squares runs from top left to bottom right.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  Make two of this block.

Assembling the medallion

Layout for the medallion

Layout for the medallion

Arrange the four blocks in two pairs.  Place block one in the top right and bottom left with block 2 in the top left and bottom right.  Rotate the blocks so that the three white squares are always in the corner of the medallion, with the blue squares nearest the middle.

Sew the blocks together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other to complete the starbright quilt block.  You’ve probably noticed that this is very similar to the Carpenters Wheel quilt block – there are quite a number of blocks with very similar layouts to this.

At this stage the medallion should measure 24.1/2″ square.

Add the first border

Add the first border

First border

For the first border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of white fabric.  You will need two lengths of 24.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 30.1/2″ for the sides.  I wanted to have this white border to ensure that the central area stood out and didn’t blend into the borders.

Second border

For the second border I have used a simple star design.

Make half square triangles as above with all the 2.7/8″ squares.

Star block layout

Star block layout

Lay the patchwork pieces out in three rows of three.  There’s a 2.1/2″ red square in the middle and a turquoise square in each corner.  Check the photo to see which way to place the half square triangles to get the star shape.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  Make twenty four of this block.

Add the second border

Add the second border

Sew the stars together in two strips of five stars and two strips of seven stars.

Sew the five star strips to the top and bottom of the quilt and sew the seven star strips to the sides.

Add the third border

Add the third border

Starbright medallion quilt – third border

For the third border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of the blue fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 42.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the starbright medallion quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Statue of Liberty, New York

Statue of Liberty, New York

Last week I promised you some images from my American holiday and my niece’s wedding.  You can find them here – or click on the photo.

Now if I could just persuade my body to work to UK sleep patterns rather than American ones …….

Pinwheel Star Quilt Pattern

Pinwheel star quilt

Pinwheel star quilt

For the pinwheel star quilt pattern I have used three different quilt blocks – all very simple ones.  The quilt is a good lap quilt size (41″ square) and comes together really quickly.  There aren’t even too many half square triangles!  I’ve used 3/4 yard each of red, blue and cream fabrics to make nine quilt blocks which are all 9″ finished size, together with three borders in the same colours.  Together they come together to make a pretty star with pinwheels in the quilt corners.

You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the pinwheel star quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

4.3/8″ squares:  eight blue, eight cream

3.7/8″ squares:  six blue, six cream

3.1/2″ squares:  one blue

1.1/2″ by 7.1/2″ strips:  ten red

1.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips:  ten red

2.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ strips:  two cream

2.1/2″ by 7.1/2″ strips:  two cream

3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips:  four blue, four cream

For the borders you will need to cut four 3.1/2″ cream strips across the width of fabric, four 1.1/2″ blue strips and four 3.1/2″ red strips

Central quilt block layout

Central quilt block layout

Making the central quilt block

Begin with a 3.1/2″ blue square in the middle.  Sew a 3.1/2″ cream strip to top and bottom and a 7.1/2″ cream strip to each side.

Sew a 7.1/2″ red strip to the top and bottom and finally sew a 9.1/2″ red strip to each side.

You only need to make one of this block.

Making the pinwheel quilt block

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangles using the 4.3/8″ squares.  Place a blue and a cream square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 4″ squares.

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Pinwheel quilt block layout

Use four half square triangles for each pinwheel.  Place them in two pairs as shown.  Sew the pairs together and then sew the pairs to each other to make a four patch unit.

Sew a 7.1/2″ red strip to the top and bottom of the block and then sew a 9.1/2″ red strip to each side.

You need to make four of these blocks.

Making the stripey quilt block

Stripey quilt block layout

Stripey quilt block layout

Make half square triangle units with the 3.7/8″ squares.  Place three of these side by side with the blue triangles in the top left.

The rest of the block is made using a blue 3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strip at the top, then a cream strip and finally the half square triangles.

Sew the half square triangles together first and then sew the rows to each other.  You need to make four of this block.

Assembling the pinwheel star quilt

Pinwheel star quilt layout

Pinwheel star quilt layout

Lay the blocks out in three rows of three.  The first row is made with a stripey block in the middle and a pinwheel block on either side.  The stripey block is placed with the triangles on the bottom.

The second row is made with the central block in the middle and a stripey block on either side.  These are placed so that the triangles run along the edges of the central block.

The third row is made with a stripey block in the middle and a pinwheel block on either side.  The stripey block is placed so that the triangles are at the top of the block.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

First quilt border

First quilt border

For the first border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of cream fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 27.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the sides.

The second border is made using 1.1/2″ strips of blue.  You’ll need two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 35.1/2″ for the sides.

Final border for the pinwheel star quilt

Final border for the pinwheel star quilt

Finally for the third border I have enclosed the quilt with 3.1/2″ strips of red – two lengths of 35.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 41.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the pinwheel star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Facing Africa - NOMA

Facing Africa – NOMA

Recently I have become aware of a small charity that gives extraordinary help to individual people with a dreadful disease called NOMA.  I am so impressed with what they do that I feel I want to help them as much as I can.  I have set up a Just Giving page for donations and I am going to donate all the proceeds of my quilt sales to them.  You can find out more about them either by clicking on the photo or by clicking on Facing Africa – NOMA.

 

Diamond Star Quilt Pattern




Diamond star quilt

Diamond star quilt

The diamond star quilt is made using two different quilt blocks – I found that when I used the one block only, the block design rather disappeared in the quilt.  I have made nine blocks which are 18″ square finished size, using 1.1/4 yards of dark blue and 1 yard each of red, light blue and white.

I added some red in the alternate block to give a bit more pizazz to the quilt – thought you’d like that, Irena!

You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.

Cutting requirements for the diamond star quilt

6.1/2″ squares:  five white, four red

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty white, twenty dark blue

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty each in dark blue and white, twenty each in light blue and white, twenty each in light blue and dark blue

3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  eight light blue

3.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles:  eight light blue, eight dark blue

3.1/2″ by 18.1/2″ rectangles:  eight dark blue

For the border you’ll need to cut six 3.1/2″ red strips across the width of fabric

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Making the diamond star quilt block

Make half square triangle units with the 3.7/8″ squares in the colour pairings listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Layout of central section

Layout of central section

Lay out the middle of the block first.  Begin with a 6.1/2″ white square.  On each edge of this place a four patch unit made using two dark blue/light blue half square triangles and two light blue/white half square triangles.  These are placed so that a larger dark blue triangle forms against the edge of the white square, pointing away from the square.  The other two units are placed so that they form a larger light blue triangle, again pointing away from the middle.

Diamond star quilt block full layout

Diamond star quilt block full layout

Each corner is also formed with a four patch unit.  This time it’s two dark blue/white half square triangles placed to form a butterfly shape across the corner, together with a white square in the corner, diagonally opposite a dark blue square.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the squares together across the row for rows 1, 2, 5 and 6.

For the central section, you’ll need to sew together the four patch unit on each side first and then sew these to the sides of the central white square.

Finally sew the rows to each other to complete the diamond star quilt block.  You’ll need to make five of these.

Layout for alternate quilt block

Layout for alternate quilt block

Making the alternate quilt block

For this block you’ll need to begin with the 6.1/2″ red square in the middle.  This is surrounded by a light blue frame – a 6.1/2″ strip above and below it with a 12.1/2″ strip on either side.

The outer frame is made with dark blue strips: two 12.1/2″ strips at top and bottom and an 18.1/2″ strip on either side.

Sew the light blue strips to the top and bottom of the red square and then add the side strips.  Do the same with the dark blue frame – add the strips top and bottom first and then add the side strips.  You’ll need to make four of these.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assembling the diamond star quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  The first and third rows are made with a diamond star quilt block in the middle and an alternate block on either side.

The second row is made with three diamond star blocks.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the diamond star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

After I complained about the weather last week, the sun came out and we’ve enjoyed the most wonderful week of summer.  I felt so energised that I have layered three quilts and (even more important!) I have finally finished setting up Minnie, my longarm quilting machine, in her new home.  I can’t wait to begin using her again – just the small matter of a trip to the dentist this afternoon to get out of the way first.

Pegs Star Quilt Pattern

Pegs star quilt

Pegs star quilt

The Pegs Star quilt block design was sent to me by a fellow quilter who has given me her permission to use it in a quilt – and what a stunning quilt it makes!  Thanks, Peg, for the block.  The half rectangle triangles give both that wonderful circular feel to the design as well as forming stars where the blocks join together.

I’ve used nine 18″ square finished size blocks sewn together in three rows of three to give a 64″ square finished size quilt.  I needed 3/4 yard of lilac fabric, 1 yard of gold, 1.1/4 yards of yellow and purple with 1.1/2 yards of brown fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed pegs star quilt block

Completed pegs star quilt block

Cutting requirements for the pegs star quilt

6.1/2″ squares:  nine lilac

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty six lilac

6.7/8″ squares:  eighteen cream, cut along one diagonal

7.1/4″ squares:  nine purple, but along both diagonals

3.7/8″ by 6.7/8″ rectangles:  thirty six yellow, thirty six brown

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ brown strips across the width of fabric, six 1.1/2″ yellow strips across the width of fabric and six 2.1/2″ strips of purple across the width of fabric.

Central area layout

Central area layout

Making the pegs star quilt block

Make the central area of the block first:  the 6.1/2″ lilac square lies in the middle with a purple triangle on each edge and four gold triangles outside them.

Sew the first two triangles to the lilac square

Sew the first two triangles to the lilac square

Sew the first two purple triangles to the central square, press them with the seam allowances away from the lilac.

Back view

Back view

Sew the remaining two purple triangles in place and press, again with the seam allowances towards the purple.

Note that the edges of the triangles are slightly longer than the edges of the square – make sure that the tips of the triangles stick out by the same amount on each side so that the triangle is centred on the edge of the square.

Trim the edges where the triangle tips stick out to give a straight line to the newly formed square.

Add the gold triangles

Add the gold triangles

Repeat the process with the gold triangles – sew the first two in place, press and then sew the remaining two triangles in place.

Make half rectangle triangles

Make half rectangle triangles

That completes the central area of the block.  For the next frame you will need to make half rectangle triangles.  Cut the yellow and brown rectangles along one diagonal.  Use the fabric as it comes from the shop – two layers with one layer right side up and the other one wrong side up.  This way you will get the two different half rectangle triangle units which are mirror images of each other.

Place one yellow triangle with one brown triangle to re form a rectangle.  In the photo you can see what I mean by mirror images – in one unit the brown is on the left while in the other it is on the right.  Sew the two triangles together along the diagonal and press open.  Trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Pegs star quilt block layout

Pegs star quilt block layout

Lay out the final frame of the quilt block.  There’s a 3.1/2″ lilac square in each corner with two half rectangle triangles along each edge of the central area.  These are placed so that the brown triangles together form a larger triangle pointing towards the middle.

Sew all the half rectangle triangles together in pairs.  Sew one pair to the top and the bottom of the central area to make one column.  Sew the corner squares to the remaining pairs to make a column on each side.

Sew the three columns to each other to complete the quilt block.  Make nine of these.

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

Assembling the Pegs star quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.

For the first border I have used the 2.1/2″ brown strips – I feel that this helps to create the illusion of the design floating in the brown.  You’ll need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the sides.

The second border is made using 1.1/2″ strips of yellow:  two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally for the third border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of purple.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 64.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Pegs star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

The Malvern quilt show is on this weekend and I’m hoping to get there later today if possible.  I was pleased to find that Malvern is no further away from Birmingham than it was from Ludlow.

Winged Star Quilt Pattern

Winged star quilt

Winged star quilt

The winged star quilt block makes a delightful quilt – especially when teamed with a simple alternate block to help the stars stand out.  It also coincidentally gives a lovely square around the central stars as a secondary design.  The blocks are both 12″ squares and I’ve used eight of each to make this quilt.  It measures 54″ square and I required 1/2 yard of light blue fabric with 1.1/4 yards each of dark blue, white and batik fabrics.

You can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer, but please note that I cannot post any parcels till next Tuesday the 10th May.




Cutting requirements for the winged star quilt

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty two each in dark blue and white, thirty two each in light blue and white

6.7/8″ squares:  eight each in dark blue and white, eight each in dark blue and batik

For the border you will need to cut five 3.1/2″ strips of batik fabric across the width of fabric

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the winged star quilt block

Make half square triangles with both the 3.7/8″ and the 6.7/8″ squares.  Lay two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are either 3.1/2″ or 6.1/2″ squares.

Winged star quilt block layout

Winged star quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in four rows of four.  Each shape is basically a larger dark blue triangle with two light blue triangles on the ends.  These shapes all point in different directions and a white diamond forms in the middle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the winged star quilt block.  Make eight of these.

Alternate block layout

Alternate block layout

Making the alternate quilt block

Lay the larger half square triangles in two rows of two.  They are placed so that a larger triangle forms in both batik and white, with two larger triangles in dark blue.

Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs together to complete the block.  Make eight of these also.

Assembling the winged star quilt

Row one of the winged star quilt

Row one of the winged star quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.

The first row is made with a winged star block at each end and two alternate blocks in the middle.  These are placed so that the batik triangles are at the bottom and the dark blue triangles are on either side.

Rows 2 and 3

Rows 2 and 3

Rows two and three are the same as each other, with two winged star in the middle and an alternate block at each end.  These are placed so that the white triangles are on the outside, with the batik triangles neares the winged star blocks.

Row 4

Row 4

Row four is the same as row one, but with the batik triangles at the top and the white triangles at the bottom of the alternate blocks.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

Quilt border

For the border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of batik fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the winged star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

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