Stained Glass Quilt Tutorial – Pansy

Stained glass quilt tutorial

Stained glass quilt tutorial

For this stained glass quilt tutorial I have used a simple pansy template.  Many stained glass quilt patterns have Christmas as a theme, so I decided to make something different, suitable for any time of year.  I’ve used two pansy blocks with black Clover bias tape around the petals and then I’ve used 1.1/2″ strips of black fabric in the borders to continue the stained glass theme.

There are many ways of producing the stained glass effect, and this method is probably the most common.  I try to find templates that have smooth curves as they are easier to use.  This pansy template comes from EQ7.  The pansy quilted wall hanging measures just over 17″ wide and about 30″ long.

Cutting requirements for the stained glass quilt tutorial

White fabric:  two 12″ squares

Pansy fabrics:  scraps in three different colours – I’ve used purple, blue and yellow/green

Black fabric:  1.1/2″ strips:  three 12″ long, two 26.1/2″ long to border the pansy blocks.  Two 16″ long and two 30.1/2″ long for the border.  Two small circles for the middle of the pansies.

Coloured fabric for the border:  1.1/2″ strips: two 14″ long and two 28.1/2″ long

Backing and wadding:  rectangles 17″ by 32″

Make two copies of the template

Make two copies of the template

Making the pansy stained glass quilt blocks

Print two copies of the pansy template which you can find by clicking here.  You’ll need one of them left whole and one cut into petals.  Number them, starting with number 1 in the bottom right petal and working clockwise with the numbering.

Place the first template (of the whole pansy) under one of the white squares and draw the shape onto the fabric.  Repeat with the second white square.  I have drawn these shapes on the right side of the fabric.

Cut the petals in fabric

Cut the petals in fabric

Use the individual petal templates to cut the shapes in fabric.  Cut two of each template and make sure that you keep them all separate so that you can keep track of which number each shape is.

Place the petals on the pansy template

Place the petals on the pansy template

Begin placing the petals on each white square.  The edges should just lay next to each other.  Pin in place.

Begin placing the tape on petal one

Begin placing the tape on petal one

Fuse the tape to the fabric

Fuse the tape to the fabric

The Clover bias tape is adhesive on one side and can be fused on to the fabric using an iron.  Begin laying the tape across the top of petal number one, easing it to follow the curves.  Using the tip of your iron (and watch out for your fingers!) press the tape in place as you lay it.

Begin to tape petal two

Begin to tape petal two

Finish with the blue petal

Finish with the blue petal

Cut the tape at the end of the top of petal one, and begin again in the middle of the pansy to lay tape up one side and across the top of petal two.  As you can see, the tape for petal two will cover the end of the tape for petal one, making the whole stained glass quilt neater.  This is why we work methodically around the petals, finishing with the blue petal on the right side.  For this petal the tape begins and ends at the middle, so the ends of the tape on the petals on either side of it are covered.

For the middle of the stained glass pansy I didn’t trust myself to make a neat circle using tape as it’s such a small shape, so instead I cut a small black circle in black fabric.  After backing this with fusible interfacing I could press it in the middle of the pansy, covering all the ends of the tape from the petals.

Sew the blocks together with black strips

Sew the blocks together with black strips

Assembling the parts of the stained glass quilt tutorial

Sew the two pansy stained glass quilt blocks to each other using 12″ black fabric strips and sew a 26.1/2″ black strip to either side.

Add the borders

Add the borders

Use 1.1/2″ strips of coloured fabric for the first border – sew the two short strips to the top and bottom and the two longer strips to the sides.  Finally for the last border use 1.1/2″ black strips again – two 16″ strips for the top and bottom and two 30.1/2″ strips for the sides.

Layer the stained glass patchwork

Layer the stained glass patchwork

Leave a gap in the stitching

Leave a gap in the stitching

Lay the wadding on the work surface and lay the backing fabric on top with right side up.  Lay the stained glass patchwork on top with right side down.  Pin.  Using a 1/4″ seam, sew around three and a half sides of the stained glass patchwork to secure the three layers together.  Leave one half of one of the short edges open so that you create a gap through which to turn everything right side out.  When you have turned it all right side out, turn under a small hem across the gap and slipstitch in place.  Press well on both sides.

Quilting the stained glass quilt wall hanging

Quilting showing on the back

Quilting showing on the back

For this stained glass quilt tutorial I have left sewing the black tape in place until the final stage when I was doing the quilting.  I did this because I had hoped that the petals would stand out more if the tape was sewn down through the wadding and backing.  In fact I wouldn’t say that this is really noticeable, so in it wouldn’t have made any difference if I had sewn the tape as soon as I had finished the blocks.  Aah, hindsight is a wonderful thing.

The traditional way of securing the tape in stained glass quilt tutorials is to sew two lines of stitching, one on each side of the tape.  I find that this is quite time consuming and my lines are never that accurate so I use a zigzag stitch instead.  This means that I am still stitching on both sides of the tape so should still be securing the fabric on each side of the tape.

Echo quilting around the pansy

Echo quilting around the pansy

You’ll need to use a walking foot and black thread to do this stitching.  You can see in the photo that some of the zigzag lines look darker than others.  This is because I had to stitch along some lines twice in order to cover all the edges once to secure all the tape in place without having to keep stopping, moving the needle and starting again.  When the pansies were secure I stitched in straight lines along each edge of the black fabric border strips.

After this I changed to white thread and stitched two lines of echo quilting around the pansies just to emphasis them better.

Here’s the video:

The base for my sewing shed

The base for my sewing shed

Last week I had the concrete base laid for my girl-shed where I’m planning to set up Minnie, my longarm quilting machine.  You can see a photo of where the shed will go and then in a few weeks’ time I’ll be able to show you the shed itself.  As you can see, I have quite a narrow garden.

 

Batik Stained Glass Quilt Pattern

Batik stained glass quilt

Batik stained glass quilt

The stained glass quilt pattern is always a favourite.  I’ve used batiks because I always feel that black really makes the colours of batiks zing.  When making a stained glass quilt with curved edges you are probably used to using the ready made bias tape and ironing it on, but for this stained glass quilt I have used straight edges only and have added the black in as a 1/4″ sashing between the sections.  The method that I have used makes this a really simple quilt to make – not a triangle in sight!

The quilt measures 40″ square and I have used 1/4 yard each of four different fabrics with 3/4 yard of the fifth fabric and 3/4 yard of black.  I have run out of black so the special offer this week is for the batiks only – 1.3/4 yards of batiks at a discount of 10%.

Cutting requirements for the batik stained glass quilt

For each block you will need four 3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles and one 3.1/2″ square – that’s sixty four rectangles and sixteen squares.  To get these from my five fabrics I cut two 3.1/2″ strips of four of the fabrics and three of the fifth fabric

From the black fabric cut twenty 1″ strips across the width of fabric

For the border you will need four 2.1/2″ strips cut across the width of one of the fabrics

Fold the sashing strips in half

Fold the sashing strips in half

Sashing requirements for each block

Sashing requirements for each block

How to make the stained glass quilt blocks

The black sashing is made using 1″ strips of black fabric sewn within each block rather than added on to the edge.  This makes it a very simple method because you are not changing the size of each section when you add the sashing.

Fold the strips in half along the length and press to create a fold mark along the strips.  For each stained glass quilt block you will need one 3.1/2″ length, two 6.1/2″ lengths and one 9.1/2″ length.  You need sixteen blocks to complete the stained glass quilt.

Before you begin sewing the blocks, a quick word about needles.  Batik fabrics are generally made from fabric that has a higher thread count and is more densely woven than normal quilting fabrics.  You may find your needle thumping a bit as it sews batiks.  The answer is to use a slightly thinner needle than usual – and make sure it’s a sharp needle.  If you normally use a 75/11 or 80/12, you may want to try a 70/10.  This should have less difficulty slipping between the threads of the fabric.

Stained glass quilt block layout

Stained glass quilt block layout

Lay the batiks out with three rectangles on the left hand side and a square and rectangle on the right hand side.  Place the black strips between all the pieces.

Add the sashing strips

Add the sashing strips

Lay a black strip along the edge of a rectangle or square and unfold it.  Sew the strip to the rectangle along the fold line.  That makes the seam line 1/2″ from the edge of the fabric.  Press the black back over the stitching.  This is one of those times when it’s worth just leaving your iron on – you need to press each time you sew a seam.

At this stage you have three layers of fabric at the edge of those pieces with sashing.  You could trim the two lower layers by 1/4″ before you fold the black fabric back over the seam.  This would reduce the bulk in your seams.  I have to confess that I didn’t do this, but I feel that I must tell you the more correct way of doing it!

Sew the next rectangle to the black edge using a 1/4″ seam.  This will give you a 1/4″ black sashing between the two pieces – but you haven’t had to cope with sewing very thin sashing strips between the rectangles.

Sew the two sides of the block together

Sew the two sides of the block together

Continue sewing the pieces of the block together.  Sew the three rectangles together using sashing strips on the left hand side and sew the square and rectangle together on the right.  Then sew the two sections together using the 9.1/2″ length of sashing.

Make sixteen stained glass quilt blocks.

Sew the blocks together with sashing

Sew the blocks together with sashing

Assembling the batik stained glass quilt

The blocks are sewn together in four rows of four.  The sashing between the blocks is made in exactly the same way – sew a 9.1/2″ length of sashing to the right hand side of the first block and then sew the second block to it.

I have rotated the blocks just to make the quilt more interesting.  If you look at the squares of the blocks, in the first block the square is on the top right while in the second block the square is on the bottom left of the block.  I’m not sure whether this was necessary – I suspect that just placing the blocks randomly wouldn’t have looked much different.

You will need three sashing strips between the four blocks in each row.  Don’t sew sashing to the ends of the rows at this stage.

Sew the rows together with sashing

Sew the rows together with sashing

Make five 36.1/2″ lengths of sashing to sew the rows of the stained glass quilt to each other.  Sew a sashing strip to the top and the bottom of the quilt as well as between each row.

Sew sashing to the sides of the stained glass quilt

Sew sashing to the sides of the stained glass quilt

 

For the sides of the quilt you will need two 36.1/2″ lengths of sashing.  It’s easier to sew them on as one long strip rather than adding sashing to the sides of each row.

 

Add a border

Add a border

Stained glass quilt border

I hadn’t intended to use an additional border, but I decided that the sashing strips wouldn’t be too easy to sew the binding to, so I added 2.1/2″ strips of one of the batik fabrics for a border.  You will need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.  Now you can use black for the binding to complete the stained glass effect.

That completes the stained glass quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding. Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Last week I made a puff quilt cushion which is probably more of a seat pad – something that you can carry around with you and be comfortable wherever you are.  You can click on puff quilt to see it.

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