Flamingo Quilt Pattern – Tropicana Fabrics

Flamingo quilt

Flamingo quilt

For the Flamingo quilt pattern I have used fabrics from a lovely new range called Tropicana by Fabric Freedom.  I have based the block on the golden gate quilt block, using twelve 18″ blocks sewn together in four rows of three.

The rectangular quilt measures 62″ by 80″.  I have used 1 yard of pink fabric, 1.1/2 yards of green, 1/2 yard of the flamingo fabric, 3/4 yard of the tropical leaves fabric, with 1 yard of the large leaves and 1.1/4 yards of the small leaves fabric.

All these fabrics are available at a 10″ discount in this week’s special offer, but in addition I am holding a 12% sale this week (details below) to celebrate the new look to my shop.




Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the flamingo quilt

6.7/8″ squares:  twenty four pink, twenty four large leaves fabric

6.1/2″ squares:  twelve flamingo

6,1.2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  ninety six small leaves, forty eight green – cut sixteen and eight strips across the width of fabric for these

For the borders you will need fifteen 1.1/2″ green strips and eight 2.1/2″ tropical leaves strips, all cut across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangles

Use the 6.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a pink and a large leaves square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Mark a seam along one diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are now 6.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the pink triangle and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the stripey blocks

Make the stripey blocks

Make the stripey blocks

Sew together 2.1/2″ strips of green and small leaves fabric for this block.  Use a light fabric on either side with a dark fabric in the middle.

Cut these panels at 6.1/2″ intervals to make 6.1/2″ squares.  You need four of these for each block – forty eight in total.

Flamingo quilt block layout

Flamingo quilt block layout

Make the flamingo quilt block

The block itself is very easy to make – a simple nine patch block.

Place a flamingo block in the middle with a stripey block on each edge of the central square.  Place these so that in two of them the stripes are horizontal while in the other two they are vertical.  This way they form a frame around the central square.

Place a half square triangle unit in each corner of the block, always with the pink on the outside forming the corners of the block.  The pink was chosen to tie in with the flamingoes and has the lovely name of Hot Pink!

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows together.  The blocks measure 18.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make twelve of them.

Assemble the flamingo quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of three.  The blocks are symmetrical so it doesn’t matter which way you sew them unless like me you are using a directional fabric.  I made sure that I kept the flamingoes standing the right way up when I sewed the blocks together.

Three quilt borders

Three quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

I had intended to use one border only.  However I decided that the quilt deserved more of a frame so I ended up with three borders.

I made the first border using 1.1/2″ strips of green:  two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 74.1/2″ for the sides.

For the second border I used 2.1/2″ strips of a new fabric called Tropical Leaves.  I needed two lengths of 56.1/2″ for top and bottom with two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally for the third border I returned to the 1.1/2″ strips of green – two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 80.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Flamingo quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Stepping stones

Stepping stones

I was asked for an image of the stepping stones in my garden so here it is.  Apologies for the shadow of the friend with his spade who helped me – I didn’t notice it till this morning.

They mean that I should be able to walk to my workshop in the winter without my feet sinking in to soggy grass.

New shop design

Now the big news this week is that I have a new home page on my shop.  It was suggested to me by the people who run the shopping cart side of things.  It was terribly stressful when they began work because they were emphasising what I thought were all the wrong things and using photos from the internet rather than my own photos.  Luckily we managed to agree things eventually and I am thrilled with the results – much more professional looking than it used to be.

In order to celebrate the new look  I am holding an autumn sale – 12% off all purchases over £5 throughout the shop.  No coupon code needed – the discount will be applied automatically at the checkout.  You can browse the shop here.

Nine Patch Jelly Roll Quilt Pattern

Nine patch jelly roll quilt

Nine patch jelly roll quilt

For this nine patch jelly roll quilt I wanted to make the entire quilt using just one jelly roll.  I nearly succeeded, only needing to add two strips of fabric from stash for the final border.  However, I know that jelly rolls do vary in the number of strips of fabric, so you may be able to complete this quilt with just the jelly roll.

There are lots of jelly roll quilt patterns, but I find that very often they require a jelly roll plus a lot of extra fabric.  The target that I set myself here was to use one jelly roll only.




Computer image to show the quilt design

Computer image to show the quilt design

If you haven’t come across jelly rolls before, they are rolls of fabric cut to 2.1/2″ wide and the strips all come from one fabric manufacturer so they usually all go together well.  It’s a great way of getting a wide variety of fabric without having to buy individual quantities of each fabric.  Although the strips are always the same width, the number of strips within a jelly roll can vary.

Because the fabrics vary so much, I have included a computer image of the quilt here using just a few colours so that you can see the quilt design more clearly.

Sort the fabric strips

Sort the fabric strips

Preparing the fabric

I began by sorting the strips into broadly dark, medium and light strips.  In fact I used the medium strips as either dark or light depending on what I needed and I also used them for the borders.

Make the stripey block

Make the stripey block

Make the stripey block

Sew together three strips of fabric in dark, light, dark colours.  This made a panel 6.1/2″ wide by the length of the strips.  Cut this at 6.1/2″ intervals to make a simple 6.1/2″ square.  This is the stripey block.  You should get six of these from each panel.  I found that I could also cut one 2.1/2″ strip from each panel.

Make the nine patch quilt block

Make the nine patch quilt block

Making the nine patch quilt block

For this block I needed panels of dark, light, dark fabric as above, but also some light, dark, light panels of fabric.  Cut these at 2.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles of fabric 2.1/2″ wide by 6.1/2″ long.

Place two dark, light, dark strips of fabric with a light, dark, light strip between them as shown in the top right of the photo.  Sew these three strips together to make the nine patch jelly roll quilt block.

Completed blocks

Completed blocks

The completed blocks

Both these quilt blocks are 6.1/2″ square at this stage.  You need to make twenty four of the stripey blocks and thirty nine of the nine patch jelly roll quilt blocks.

In order to do this, I needed to make nine panels of dark, light, dark fabric together with three panels of light, dark, light fabrics.

First three rows of the nine patch jelly roll quilt

Sew the blocks together in nine rows of seven blocks.

First three rows

First three rows

The first row is made with a stripey block at each end and five nine patch blocks between them.  Note that the left hand stripey block is placed with the stripes horizontal while the other stripey block has the stripes vertical.

In the second row the blocks are reversed, with a nine patch block at each end and five stripey blocks between them.  Note that the stripey blocks alternate between horizontal and vertical placements.

For the third row place a three nine patch blocks in the middle with a vertical stripey block either side of them and a nine patch block at each end.

Central area

Central area

Central area of the quilt

The next four rows are very similar to each other.  Each row has three nine patch blocks in the middle and a nine patch block at each end.  Place the stripey blocks in the second and sixth places of each row.

The stripey blocks alternate down the column, beginning with a horizontal block, then vertical beneath it and so on.  This is the only difference between the rows.

Last two rows

Last two rows

Final two rows of the nine patch jelly roll quilt

The last two rows are similar to the first two rows.  For row eight place a nine patch block at each end with five stripey blocks between them.  In row nine place a stripey block at each end with five nine patch blocks between them.  Check whether the stripey blocks are horizontal or vertical.  My intention with the corner blocks was to have them form a sort of circle around the quilt – that’s why they are placed both horizontally and vertically.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows together.  At this stage the quilt top measures 42.1/2″ by 54.1/2″.

Leftover fabric

Leftover fabric

Make the top and bottom quilt borders

Now my target was to use up the remainder of the jelly roll strips for the borders.  I had six complete strips of fabric and some 6.1/2″ strips left.  Note that you may have a different amount left over as jelly rolls do vary.

Top and bottom borders

Top and bottom borders

I decided to make three borders for the top and bottom of the quilt.

For the first border I used a strip of light fabric.  In the second border I used seven of the 6.1/2″ strips – that’s twenty one squares altogether.

I made the third border with a strip of medium fabric.  Sew the three strips together and sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.

Add the side borders

Add the side borders

Make the side borders

By now I was really running short of fabric strips!  I had one light strip left which I didn’t want to use for these borders.  I cut two medium 2.1/2″ strips from my stash and used them with the remaining medium strip and a few individual squares of medium fabric to make two 66.1/2″ lengths for the sides.

That completes the nine patch jelly roll quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Peckforton Castle

Pckforton Castle

My travels last week took me into Staffordshire to somewhere called Peckforton Castle.  What a treat that was!  It’s a genuine castle, although not as old as many of our castles.  It was built in the mid 19th century by a railway magnate for his family.  Outside it looks centuries old but inside there are all mod cons – and two lovely restaurants.

 

Grandmothers Choice Quilt Pattern

Grandmothers choice quilt

Grandmothers choice quilt

For the Grandmothers Choice quilt I have used two different blocks to create a quilt that could be suitably masculine in some colour choices or delightfully feminine in different colour choices.  The quilt is rectangular and is rather large at 64″ by 94″, using twenty four blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.  To complete the quilt I used 1.3/4 yards of white, 2.1/4 yards of brown and 2.3/4 yards of yellow fabric.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the grandmothers choice quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  seventy two brown, forty eight white

6.1/2″ squares:  forty eight brown

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  forty eight yellow

6.7/8″ squares:  twenty four white, twenty four yellow

For the border you will need to cut eight 2.1/2″ yellow strips across the width of fabric.

Grandmothers choice quilt block

Grandmothers choice quilt block

Make the grandmothers choice quilt block

Definitely an easy one this!  Place a 6.1/2″ brown square in each corner with a 3.1/2″ brown square in the middle.  Between each pair of corners place a yellow rectangle.  Sew the pieces together to form three rows and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  You need to make twelve of these.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangles

Use the 6.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a yellow and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 6.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the yellow and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the alternate block

Alaska Homestead quilt block layout

Alaska Homestead quilt block layout

For the alternate block I have chosen the Alaska Homestead quilt block.  Lay the squares out as shown with a half square triangle in each corner and a 3.1/2″ brown square in the middle.  Place the triangles so that the white is always on the outside, forming the corners of the block.

Between each pair of corners place a brown square and a white square.  As you can see, that means that the central cross is made of alternating brown and white squares.

Sew the rows to each other

Sew the rows to each other

In the first and third rows you need to sew the two small squares together first.  Then sew the pieces together across the rows.  The second row is straightforward – just sew all the squares together across the row.

Sew the rows to each other to complete the alternate block.  You need to make twelve of these.

Rows 1 and 6

Rows 1 and 6

Assemble the grandmothers choice quilt

The blocks are sewn together in six rows of four.  Each row contains two grandmothers choice block and two alternate blocks.  Rows one and six are made with an alternate block at each end and two grandmothers choice blocks between them.

Rows 2 - 5

Rows 2 – 5

The blocks are reversed for rows 2, 3, 4 and 5, with a grandmothers choice block at each end and two alternate blocks between them.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Make the border with 2.1/2″ strips of yellow fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 94.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Bourneville pavilion

Bourneville pavilion

After all my gardening last week, I needed a trip to the tip to take all my garden clippings.  I have to go through a part of Birmingham called Bourneville – which of course is where all the chocolate is made.  I will go to Cadbury World one day and show you some photos, but on this particular day it was the Pavilion that struck me.

Bourneville pavilion - side view

Bourneville pavilion – side view

When the boys were young I took them to cricket grounds all over the country for their games, but I don’t remember ever seeing such a beautiful pavilion as this one.  Before you ask, yes it was raining when I took these photos.  You can see the rain spots on the top photo!

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