Anniversary Dog Quilt – Free Pattern

Anniversary dog quilt

Anniversary dog quilt

I’ve named the Anniversary Dog quilt after two totally different things.  The first is that the design comes from a wall in a restaurant that I went to in London last weekend.  I had been to watch the Anniversary Games held in the Olympic Stadium (more about that at the end of the page).  The second totally separate reason for the name is that I’ve used all the fabrics from a new range of dog fabrics that I have just bought.

The quilt is rectangular, measuring 49″ by 64″.  I’ve used twelve blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.  The fabric requirement is for 3/4 yard of each of five different fabrics with just 1/4 yard of light blue.  I’ve tried to call the fabrics in shades of blue rather than just the pattern on the fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the Anniversary Dog quilt

Light blue fabric (dog breeds):  thirty six 3.1/2″ squares

Medium blue fabric (words):  twelve 6.1/2″ squares, twelve 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles

Dark blue fabric (bones):  twenty four 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles

The wall that inspired the quilt design

The wall that inspired the quilt design

White fabric (dog silhouettes):  twelve 6.1/2″ squares, twelve 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles, twelve 3.1/2″ squares

Red fabric:  twelve 15.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ strips of a sixth fabric across the width of fabric.

The block is most easily made in two completely separate halves

Make the top half of the block

Top half of the block

Top half of the block

Begin with a 6.1/2″ medium blue square on the left.  Next to this place a white rectangle and a light blue square with a light blue square and a dark blue rectangle beneath them.

Sew the pieces across the two right hand rows and then sew the two rows to each other.  Sew this section to the square on the left.

It’s an incredibly simple design, but it just struck me as  delightful when I saw it on the wall.

Make the lower half of the block

Lower half of the block

Lower half of the block

This is very similar to the top half, but place the large 6.1/2″ square on the right this time.  Working from the left, place a light blue square and a dark blue rectangle with a medium blue rectangle and light blue square beneath them.  Place a large white square on the right.

Once again sew the rectangles to the small squares and then sew these two rows to each other.  Sew this panel to the white square on the right.

Completing the block

Add red sashing

Add red sashing

I had intended to sew these two sections of the block together to make a rectangular block, but when I put several of them together they just looked a muddle.  So I decided to add a red strip across the middle between the two sections.  I felt that this would help me give some structure to the quilt design.

It also makes the block square, although that was not my primary objective.

Sew a red sashing strip between the top and lower half of the block.

The block now measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make twelve of these.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the anniversary dog quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of three blocks.

In the first row the red stripes are all vertical.  I’m using the red stripes and the medium blue large squares to define how to place each block.  The blue squares are placed bottom left, bottom left and then top right.

Row two

Row two

For the second row, the red stripes are vertical then horizontal then vertical again.

Place the medium blue squares bottom left, bottom right and then top right.

Row three

Row three

In row three the red stripes are again vertical then horizontal and then vertical.  Place the medium blue squares bottom left, top left and then top right.

Row four

Row four

Finally for row four place the red stripes all vertically.  The medium blue squares lie bottom left, top right and top right.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border you will need to sew two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 64.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the anniversary dog quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

The Monument in London

The Monument in London

The Anniversary Games are held each year in the former Olympic Stadium in London.  Last weekend was the first time that I had visited the Stadium and it was a real treat to see some of the great stars of athletics in action.  Mo Farah is retiring this year so it was a privilege to see him running.

We also had time for some sightseeing and went to see the Monument which commemorates the Great Fire of London in 1666.  The tower was built a few years later to celebrate the re building of London and it still dominates the area even all these centuries later.

Havana Cathedral Quilt – Free Pattern

Havana Cathedral quilt

Havana Cathedral quilt

The Havana Cathedral quilt is based on a gorgeous stained glass window that I saw in the Cathedral when I was in Cuba recently.  I had intended to make a wall hanging, but somehow I’ve ended up with a queen size quilt pattern!  Each block is easy to make and they are big blocks so the quilt goes together quite quickly.  It’s also rectangular and would fit a queen size bed, so it ticks a lot of boxes.

The original stained glass window

The original stained glass window

Within the quilt I have used three blocks which are 18″ by 24″ finished size and six blocks which are 24″ squares.  The fabric requirements are 2 yards each of dark blue and red, 1.3/4 yards of light blue, 3/4 yard of white and 1/2 yard of medium blue.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the Havana Cathedral quilt

Completed Havana cathedral quilt block

Completed Havana cathedral quilt block

12.7/8″ squares:  twelve light blue, six red, six dark blue

4.3/4″ squares:  twelve medium blue

3.1/2″ squares:  twelve dark blue, twelve white

3.7/8″ squares:  eighteen each in dark blue and red, twelve each in light blue and red, six each in red and white.  These are for the half square triangles.  In addition you will need six dark blue, six white and twelve red squares for the diamond in a square blocks.

For the borders you will need to cut seven strips across the width of fabric in each of 2.1/2″ red, 1.1/2″ white and 2.1/2″ dark blue.

Make half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

Half square triangle units

You need to make half square triangles with some, but not all of the 3.7/8″ squares.  Use those squares listed in pairs above.

Place a red square right sides together  with either a light blue or a dark blue square.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line. Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Place triangles around the square

Place triangles around the square

Make diamond in square units

Cut the remaining 3.7/8″ squares along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square (shown in the top right of the photo).

Lay down a 4.3/4″ medium blue square and place a dark blue and a white triangle on two opposite edges, with two red triangles on the other two opposite edge.

Trim the edges

Trim the edges

Sew the dark blue and white triangles to the edges of the square first.

Press them open and then sew the two red triangles to the square.  When you press these open you’ll see that you have created a square with a medium blue diamond in the middle.  Trim the middle of each edge where the triangle tips stick out.  This is now a 6.1/2″ square.

Top half of the block

Top half of the block

Make the Havana Cathedral quilt block

This block is made of eight rows of six squares each – that’s counting the diamond in square units as equivalent to four squares.

I’ve shown the top four rows first.  In each corner place a dark blue square with a dark blue/red half square triangle beneath it.  In the middle place two diamond in a square units.  Lay them with the red triangles in the top middle to create a larger red triangle pointing downwards.

The third and fourth rows are made with dark blue/red half square triangles at each end and a light blue/red half square triangle inside them.  In the third row there are two white squares in the middle.   For the fourth row place two red/white half square triangles in the middle.

Lower half of the block

Lower half of the block

The lower half of the block is very similar.  Rows five and six are almost the same as rows three and four.  Just check which way to place the half square triangles.

Rows seven and eight are almost the same as rows one and two.  Again it is just the direction of the triangles that has changed.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the squares together across each row.  You need to make a double row at the top and bottom of the block.

Sew the dark blue square and red/dark blue half square triangles together first.  Then you can sew them to the diamond in a square units.

Sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It measures 18.1/2″ by 24.1/2″ at the moment.  You need to make three of these.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the alternate block

This is a huge block, but I felt that it gave the right feel to the surrounding area of the Havana Cathedral blocks.  It’s also dead easy to make!

Use the 12.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units. Use exactly the same method as above for the smaller half square triangle units.

Place two red/light blue half square triangles with two red/dark blue half square triangles as shown.  This makes one large red triangle, one large dark blue triangle and two large light blue triangles.  Sew them together in pairs and then sew the pairs together to create the block.  This is now a 24.1/2″ square and you need to make six of them.

As an aside, I had originally intended to make these blocks 18″ by 24″, same as the other blocks.  However the triangles were very odd sizes for this, so I opted for simplicity and made the blocks as  squares instead.

Rows 1 and 3

Rows 1 and 3

Assemble the Havana Cathedral quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Place the Havana Cathedral block in the middle of each row.

In rows 1 and 3 place the alternate blocks on either side with the dark blue triangle on the inside.

Row 2

Row 2

For row 2 the alternate blocks are rotated so that the light blue triangles lie on the inside.

On the left hand side the red triangle lies at the top while on the right hand side the blue triangle lies at the top.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Three quilt borders

Three quilt borders

Add the quilt border

I’ve used three borders to frame the quilt.  Make the first border with 2.1/2″ red strips.  Cut two lengths of 66.1/2″ for the top and bottom together with two lengths of 76.1/2″ for the sides.

The second border is made with 1.1/2″ strips of white fabric.  Two lengths of 70,1.2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally make the third border with 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue.  Two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 82.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Havana Cathedral quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Iris flowers

Iris flowers

One of the colour combinations that I love in quilts is purple and green.  Yesterday I visited a National Trust property with a wonderful garden.  These iris flowers were a gorgeous deep purple – just as beautiful as the fantastic William Morris designs within the property.

Wightwick Manor

Wightwick Manor

The house itself was Wightwick Manor which is a celebration of the Arts and Crafts Movement – absolutely beautiful both inside and outside.

 

San Marco Quilt – Free Pattern

San Marco quilt

San Marco quilt

The San Marco quilt is the result of a quick trip I took to Venice last week.  It’s the most beautiful, inspirational city:  I’ve added a link to my Venice photos at the bottom of the page – together with a short video of a gondolier serenading his passengers.  This quilt is based on a small portion of the incredible floor tile designs that I saw in the San Marco basilica.

The quilt is rectangular, measuring 67″ by 85″, and I have used 3 yards of grey fabric with 1.1/2 yards each of red and black.  I’ve made sixty three blocks, all 9″ square finished size.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

Floor tile mosaic

Floor tile mosaic

The combination of a plain square with a diamond in a square is quite common in these floor tiles – you can see it in diagonal lines at the bottom of this photo.  It formed the basis of many of the designs.

The fact that there are plenty of plain grey squares make it a simple and quick quilt to make.  I have added the red part of the quilt design to give it some pop.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the San Marco quilt

9.1/2″ squares:  twenty eight grey

6.7/8″ squares:  sixteen grey, fourteen red

5.3/8″ squares:  sixty black

3.7/8″ squares:  ten red, ten grey

3.1/2″ squares:  twenty grey, five red

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units for the stars

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a red and a grey square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the red fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Star quilt block layout

Star quilt block layout

Make the star quilt blocks

Lay the 3.1/2″ squares and the half square triangles out in a nine patch formation.  There’s a red square in the middle, a grey square in each corner and half square triangles in the remaining spaces.  Check the photo to be sure of getting the triangle placements correct.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  You need to make five of these star blocks.

Sew the triangles to the squares

Sew the triangles to the squares

Make the diamond in a square blocks

Cut the 5.3/8″ black squares along one diagonal to create two triangles from each square.  Lay a triangle on each edge of the central 6.7/8″ square.  Sew the top and bottom triangles to the square first.  Then press these open and sew the remaining two triangles in place.

Trim the triangle tips

Trim the triangle tips

You will see that there are triangle tips sticking out in the middle of each edge.  Trim these to reduce bulk when you’re sewing the blocks together.

You need to make sixteen of these blocks in grey on black together with fourteen blocks in red on black.

The other block required is a plain 9.1/2″ grey square.

First three rows

First three rows

Assemble the San Marco quilt

Sew the blocks together in nine rows of seven blocks.  I’ll show you the rows three at a time.  In the first and third rows place the plain grey squares in positions one, three, five and seven.  The second row contains grey squares in positions two, four and six.  Place a red diamond in square in the middle of the first row with two red diamonds diagonally below it in row two.  Continue the diagonal lines with two red diamonds in row three.  Fill the remaining spaces with grey diamonds – two each in rows one and two with just one in the third row.

Rows four to six

Rows four to six

Rows four to six form the central area of the quilt.  Place a star in the middle of rows four and six, with three stars in row five.

There are two plain grey squares in each of these rows, together with two grey diamonds in each row.  The red diamonds appear twice in each of rows four and six but there are none of them in row five.

Rows seven to nine

Rows seven to nine

Finally, rows seven to nine are very similar to rows one to three.

The red diamonds are now forming a V shape to complete the overall diamond shape begun in the top of the quilt.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 63.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 85.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the San Marco quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Venice

Venice

Last week I had a magical few days in Venice.  I had so many photos that I’ve written a separate article about the gorgeous city.  Click here to see my photos and a very short video of a singing gondolier.

 

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