Quarter Log Cabin Quilt – Free Pattern

Quarter log cabin quilt

Quarter log cabin quilt

The quarter log cabin quilt pattern is just what it says – blocks made in the traditional log cabin style but representing only one quarter of a completed log cabin block.  This allows you far more freedom to rotate the blocks, allowing many new design options.  In this rectangular quilt design I have put the blocks together to make one complete log cabin block with half and three quarter log cabins around it.

The quilt measures 52″ by 68″, using 3/4 yard each of dark blue and medium blue, together with 1 yard of light blue and 1.1/4 yards of white fabric.  I have used thirty six blocks which are 8″ square finished size.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




 

Cutting requirements for the quarter log cabin quilt

2.1/2″ squares:  thirty six dark blue, thirty six medium blue

4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six medium blue, thirty six light blue

6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six light blue, thirty six white

8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six white

For the borders you will need to cut 2.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric:  three each in medium blue, light blue and white.  You will need to cut seven strips in dark blue.

Sew together two strips

Sew together two strips

Make the quarter log cabin quilt block

The first part of the block can best be made using strip sewing.  Sew together a strip of dark blue and one of medium blue.  Cut these strips at 2.1/2″ intervals. This gives you rectangles 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ which are basically a square each of the two blues.

Add a strip on the left

Add a strip on the left

Lay down one of these rectangles with the dark blue square at the bottom.  Sew a 4.1/2″ medium blue square to the left hand side.  This forms the first frame around the dark blue.

As you can see, the dark blue square is only framed on two sides, whereas in a full log cabin block it would have a medium blue frame on all four sides.

Add the light blue frame

Add the light blue frame

Now add a 4.1/2″ light blue strip to the top.  Sew a 6.1/2″ light blue strip to the left hand side.

Add the final frame

Add the final frame

For the final frame I have used white patterned fabric.  Sew a 6.1/2″ white strip to the top.  Add an 8.1/2″ strip to the left hand side.

That completes the quarter log cabin quilt block.  It measures 8.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make thirty six of them.

Assemble the quarter log cabin quilt – first three rows

First three rows

First three rows

Sew the blocks together in six rows of six.  I’m showing the rows three at a time for the sake of clarity.

I find it most simple to concentrate on the dark blue squares so that I can see which way to rotate the blocks.

Row one contains three pairs of blocks – with the dark blue at the bottom right and bottom left.  This way the dark blue squares form three rectangles.

In row two place the dark blue squares top right, bottom right twice, bottom left twice and then top left.  At each side you can now see the corner frame formed with three dark blue squares.

For the third row place the dark blue bottom right three times and then bottom left for the remaining three blocks.

Rows four, five, six

Rows four, five, six

Remaining three rows

In the second three rows the design is similar but the other way up.

For row four place the dark blue squares top right three times and then top left three times.

In row five place the dark blue bottom right, top right twice, top left twice and then finally bottom left.

Lay the blocks in row six in three pairs – one top right and one top left within each pairing.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the main section of the quilt top.

Borders for top and bottom

Borders for top and bottom

Add the quilt borders

I’ve used all the colours in the borders and have made the quilt rectangular by using bigger borders for the top and the bottom.

Both panels are made using dark blue, medium blue, light blue and white fabrics followed by an additional dark blue strip.  For each one the colours fade from dark blue to white away from the quilt.  This means placing the panels with white near the top on the first panel and near the bottom on the second panel.

Make two panels 48.1/2″ long and sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.

Add the side borders

Add the side borders

Finally add a 68.1/2″ dark blue strip to each side of the quilt.

That completes the quarter log cabin quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Palace in Oslo

Palace in Oslo

Last week I promised you some details of my trip to Oslo.  There were too many to tack on to this pattern so I have written a complete article with lots of photos.  You can see it in Visiting Oslo.

Log Cabin Cross Quilt Pattern

Log cabin cross quilt

Log cabin cross quilt

In the log cabin cross quilt I have used log cabin blocks along with stripey blocks which are made using the same fabrics in the same widths.  Just to mix things up a little, I’ve used different widths of logs.  I have also shaded one colour from dark to light and the other from light to dark.  That’s what I love about log cabin quilts – they are so simple and there are so many ways that you can vary the basic pattern.

The quilt measures 52″ by 76″.  I have used 1 yard each of light green and light purple, 3/4 yard each of dark green, medium purple and white, 1/2 yard each of medium green and dark purple.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed log cabin block

Completed log cabin block

Cutting requirements for the log cabin cross quilt

White:  twelve 3.1/2″ squares

Dark purple:  twelve 2.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ strips, twelve 2.1/2″ by 5.1/2″ strips

Medium purple:  twelve 2.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ strips, twelve 2.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ strips

Light purple:  twelve 2.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ strips, twelve 2.1/2″ by 11.1/2″ strips

Dark green:  twelve 1.1/2″ by 11.1/2″ strips, twelve 1.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ strips

Medium green:  twelve 1.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ strips, twelve 1.1/2″ by 9.1/2″

Light green:  twelve 1.1/2″ by 5.1/2″ strips, twelve 1.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ strips

For the alternate blocks you will need to cut four strips of each fabric in the widths they are used in the log cabins.  That’s 2.1/2″ in the purples, 1.1/2″ in the greens and 3.1/2″ in white

The final border is made using six 2.1/2″ strips of light green cut across the width of fabric.

First round of logs

First round of logs

Make the log cabin block first round

Use a 3.1/2″ white square for the central square.  This actually won’t finish up in the middle of the block because the logs are different widths, but it’s the starting point of the block.

Beneath that sew a 3.1/2″ dark purple strip.  On the right place a 5.1/2″ dark purple strip.  Across the top place a 5.1/2″ light green strip, followed by a 6.1/2″ light green strip on the left.

As you can see, the logs are all being sewn to the square in an anti-clockwise direction.  In other log cabins they may be sewn clockwise, but the important thing is to stick to one direction for each round of logs.

Second round of logs

Second round of logs

Second round of logs

Use the medium purple and green in this round.  Begin with the 6.1/2″ medium purple. Follow this with the 8.1/2″ medium purple.  Sew the 8.1/2″ medium green across the top.  Finish with the 9.1/2″ medium green on the left side.

Incidentally, you need to press this block at all stages, before you add another log.  Doing this increases the accuracy of the seams.  Always press the seam allowances away from the central square.

Third round of logs

Third round of logs

Third round of logs

Finally, make the third round of logs with the light purple and dark green strips.

Each block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage.  Make twelve of them.

The alternate blocks

Make panels of strips

Make panels of strips

I had intended to make the stripey blocks as individual blocks.  Then I realised that this would be an enormous waste of time, so I am using the striped sections in panels.

Make the panels using all the fabrics cut in the same widths as they are used in the log cabin blocks.  So that’s 2.1/2″ strips of purple, 1.1/2″ strips of green and a 3.1/2″ white strip.

Assemble the log cabin cross quilt

Make row 1 with a 24.1/2″ striped panel.  Place this with the purple at the top as shown in the photo above.

Rows 2 and 4

Rows 2 and 4

In rows 2 and 4, place two log cabin blocks so that the dark green runs across the top of the pair.

Rows 3 and 5

Rows 3 and 5

Rotate the blocks for rows 3 and 5 so that the dark green runs across the bottom of the pair of blocks.

Finally for row 6 place a 24.1/2″ striped panel.  This time place the green at the top of the panel.

Sew the pairs of log cabin blocks together and then sew the rows to each other.

The sides of the quilt

The sides of the quilt

The sides of the quilt

For the sides of the quilt make up two 48.1/2″ lengths of the striped panel.  Sew a log cabin block to each end of these panels.  In the photo the middle section is folded up purely so that I can show you the blocks at each end.  Rotate the log cabin blocks so that the dark green forms the outer corners of the quilt.

Sew one panel to each side of the quilt.  The panel shown forms the right hand side of the quilt.  Place the other panel the other way up for the left hand side of the quilt.  That way you keep the dark green on the outside of the quilt.

Quilt border

Quilt border

Add the quilt border

Finally make up four 2.1/2″ strips of light green for the border.  Two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the log cabin cross quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Cushions for labels

Cushions for labels

I mentioned recently that I had been to a National Trust property called Packwood House.  I didn’t have the space at the time to show you a really neat idea that they used for labels.  Usually you see printed labels on stands as you move around these properties.  However at this property they had the information printed on cushions.  I thought that was a lovely touch!

Bargello chairs

Bargello chairs

They also had some gorgeous chairs which were very similar to the Bargello chairs on display in Florence – only in much brighter colours.

It was a real treat to see them as well as some tapestries that were centuries old.

 

Log Cabin Tunnels Quilt Pattern

 

Log cabin tunnels quilt

Log cabin tunnels quilt

The log cabin tunnels quilt pattern uses a block that I’ve tried to give a three dimensional look.  There are several ways of creating depth in a quilt block – one of them is through colour placement and another is through changing the size of the parts of the block.  I’ve used both these methods for the log cabin tunnels quilt and I’m hoping that it looks as if you’re entering a tunnel in each block.

The quilt measures 49″ square and I have used fourteen different fabrics!  The good news is that you don’t need very much of any one fabric.  I’ve used 1/8 yard each of purple, the darkest three blues and the darkest two browns, 1/4 yard each of the next blue and two browns, and 1/2 yard each of the last two blue and brown fabrics and the white.  As usual you can buy these fabrics at a 10% discount in this week’s special offer.

Cutting requirements for the log cabin tunnels quilt

Purple fabric:  sixteen 2.1/2″ squares.

Blue fabrics: 1.1/2″ by 2.1/2″, 1.1/2″ by 3.1/2″, 2″ by 4.1/2″, 2″ by 6″, s.1/2″ by 7.1/2″, 2.1/2″ by 9.1/2″.  The smallest rectangle at the beginning of the list is the darkest blue and the largest rectangle at the end of the list is the lightest blue.  You’ll need sixteen of each of these rectangles – one for each block.

Brown fabrics:  1.1/2″ by 3.1/2″, 1.1/2″ by 4.1/2″, 2″ by 6″, 2″ by 7.1/2″, 2.1/2″ by 9.1/2″, 2.1/2″ by 11.1/2″.  These are again listed from darkest to lightest colour and you will need sixteen of each rectangle.

White fabric:  twelve rectangles 1.1/2″ by 11.1/2″, five strips 1.1/2″ by 47.1/2″, two strips 1.1/2″ by 49.1/2″.

Log cabin tunnels quilt block

Log cabin tunnels quilt block

Making the log cabin tunnels quilt block

The idea of a log cabin quilt block is that you have a central square (the hearth of the log cabin) and this is surrounded by strips of fabric (the logs of the cabin).  In this particular version I have placed the square in the top left hand corner of the block and then built up the logs on two sides only.  The logs beneath the square are in six different shades of blue, starting with the darkest blue, which is the smallest log, and running through the shades until the last strip is the lightest and the widest.  The logs on the right hand side of the square are six different shades of brown, again starting with the darkest brown first (on the edge of the square) and running through to the lightest brown which is on the edge of the quilt block.

The first round of logs

The first round of logs

In addition to using different shades of the two colours for the logs, I have also varied the width of the logs in order to give the illusion of depth.  The first two rounds of logs are 1″ wide finished size, the second two rounds are 1.1/2″ wide finished size and the final two rounds use strips that are 2″ wide finished size.

I am counting one strip beneath the square and one strip on the right hand side of the square as one round of logs.  The square should be the darkest fabric of all.  The first round of logs is shown in the top left of the photo – the darkest (and smallest) blue strip sewn to the bottom of the purple square and the smallest and darkest brown strip sewn to the right hand edge of the square.

Second round of logs

Second round of logs

Fourth round of logs for the log cabin tunnels quilt

Fourth round of logs for the log cabin tunnels quilt

The second round of logs is now sewn on – the next longest and next lightest of the blue and brown fabrics sewn to the lower and right hand edges of the block.  Always sew the blue bottom strip first and then the brown strip on the right.

The third and fourth rounds are shown in the right hand photo.

The sixth round of logs

The sixth round of logs

Back view of the log cabin tunnels quilt block

Back view of the log cabin tunnels quilt block

Continue adding the strips of blue and brown fabric to make the fifth and sixth rounds of logs.

Very often I finger press the seams as I build up a quilt block, but in the case of the log cabin quilt block I always press at each stage with the iron.  The seam allowances should be pressed away from the square, so that in the photo you can see all the blue seam allowances pressed towards the bottom and all the brown seam allowances pressed to the left away from the square.

Make sixteen of these log cabin tunnels quilt blocks.  Before you sew these blocks together you need to trim them – see my comments at the end of the pattern.

Sew sashing between the blocks

Sew sashing between the blocks

Assembling the log cabin tunnels quilt

I’ve used 1.1/2″ strips of white fabric for the sashing between the blocks.  You need to arrange the blocks in four rows of four.  In each row you will have four blocks and three sashing strips, so that there is no sashing at either end of the row.

First row of quilt blocks

First row of quilt blocks

The design of the quilt is achieved by rotating the blocks across each row.  I think that it’s easiest if I tell you the placement of the purple square in each block so that you can see how to rotate the blocks.

In the first row, working from left to right, the purple square is placed top right for the first block, then bottom left, then top left and finally bottom right for the fourth block.

Second row of blocks

Second row of blocks

Third row of the log cabin tunnels quilt

Third row of the log cabin tunnels quilt

In the second row the purple squares are placed bottom left, bottom left, top left and top left.

In the third row the purple squares are placed bottom right, bottom right, top right, top right.

I’ve shown the blocks side by side in order to fit them into the photo, but you will need to sew sashing strips between them.

Fourth row of blocks

Fourth row of blocks

Sew sashing between the rows of blocks

Sew sashing between the rows of blocks

Finally the fourth row has the purple squares on the top left, bottom right, top right and bottom left.

In order to sew the rows together, use 47.1/2″ lengths of white sashing, in the same way that you joined the blocks together.  You’ll need five strips of sashing so that you have one strip between each row as well as one strip at the top and bottom of the log cabin tunnels quilt.

Sew sashing to each side of the quilt

Sew sashing to each side of the quilt

Digital image of the log cabin tunnels quilt

Digital image of the log cabin tunnels quilt

Finally sew a 49.1/2″ length of sashing to each side of the quilt.

Now this is probably the right place for my confession.  I did not carry out one vital step because I was in a hurry and because I was stupid enough to think that I could get away with it:  I didn’t trim the blocks before I sewed them all together.  If you look at the quilt photo at the top you’ll see that the sashing strips don’t match up down the quilt.  This is quite simply because the blocks have not been trimmed so that they are all exactly the same size.  That’s why I’ve included a digital image – so that you can see how the log cabin tunnels quilt would have looked if I had been more careful.

Once you have completed the quilt top, you can layer, quilt and bind it.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Needle eye sculptures

Needle eye sculptures

Last week I told you that I was going to the theatre in Birmingham.  It was a lovely day and an unexpected bonus was an exhibition at the Birmingham Library of micro sculptures placed either within the eye of a needle or on a pin head.  Quite extraordinary.  You can read about it here.

Log cabin quilt without sashing

Log cabin quilt without sashing

Post Script:  I was asked what the log cabin quilt would look like without sashing, so here is a digital image without sashing.

 

 

Half Log Cabin Quilt

Half log cabin quilt

Half log cabin quilt

This half log cabin quilt was inspired by a dress that I saw in a shop in town.  The dress itself was way beyond my price range so obviously I did the next best thing and made a quilt using a similar design.  The basis of the design is a half log cabin, which is the main part of the design that is like the dress that I saw, but I have also included a nine patch unit in the middle just because I felt like it!  The quilt is 42″ wide by 80″ long.  I have used four colours plus black in each colourway and I have made four blocks in each of three different colourways.

This week’s special offer is for just the coloured fabrics of this quilt at 10% discount on the normal fabric price. Click on special offer for more details.

Three versions of the block

Three versions of the block

Fabric requirements for the half log cabin quilt

The amount of fabric used is is best listed as just what you will need for one set of blocks, because total fabric requirements will vary depending on how many colours you use.

So for four blocks I cut one 2.1/2″ strip of the first (lightest) colour, two 2.1/2″ strips each of the second and third colours and three 2.1/2″ strips of the fourth (darkest) colour.  For each four blocks, I used three 1.1/2″ strips of black fabric.  That’s about 1/2 yard total in black.

The white fabric requirements are going to be the same whatever different colours you use:

four rectangles, 4.1/2″ by 16.1/2″, four rectangles 16.1/2″ by 11.1/2″, two rectangles 16.1/2″ by 7.1/2″, two rectangles 16.1/2″ by 2.1/2″, two rectangles 16.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ and two rectangles 4.1/2″ by 8.1/2″.  That’s about 1.1/2 yards total in white fabric.

First round of the half log cabin quilt block

First round of the half log cabin quilt block

Making the half log cabin quilt block

The log cabin quilt block usually begins with square in the middle (representing the hearth of the log cabin), surrounded by strips of fabric (the logs) which are sewn on around this central square in either a clockwise or an anti clockwise direction.  For this block the starting point is a 2.1/2″ square, but the logs are only added on three sides.  They are added in an anti clockwise direction, so the first log is sewn to the top of the square, the next one to the left hand side and the third one across the bottom.  Then the process is repeated with another colour which is darker.

Begin with a 2.1/2″ square of the lightest colour.  This will be the centre of the log cabin, although it will stay on the right hand side of the block as we are only adding logs on three sides..

The first frame around it consists of a 2.1/2″ square placed above the central square, a 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangle down the left hand side and a 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangle across the bottom.

Second frame of the half log cabin

Second frame of the half log cabin

Fourth frame of the half log cabin quilt block

Fourth frame of the half log cabin quilt block

The next frame will be made using colour three.  You will need a 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip across the top, 8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip down the left hand side and a 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip across the bottom.  Sew them on in that order to the previous frame.

The fourth colour is added in another frame around the block.  You will need a 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip across the top, a 12.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip down the left hand side and an 8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip across the bottom.

Add black for the last frame of the log cabin quilt block

Add black for the last frame of the log cabin quilt block

That completes the colour section of this half log cabin quilt block.  The final round for all of them is made using 1.1/2″ strips of black fabric.  You’ll need one strip 8.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ across the top, one strip 15.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ down the left hand side and one strip 9.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ across the bottom.

Make four of these blocks in this first colour and then four more in each of two more colours – twelve log cabin quilt blocks in total.

Make a nine patch unit for the middle

Make a nine patch unit for the middle

Making the nine patch unit

I felt that the quilt needed something different in the middle, so I made a nine patch unit using squares left over from all three of the colours, with a black 2.1/2″ square in the centre.

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Completed nine patch unit

Completed nine patch unit

Finally, sew a black frame around this nine patch unit – you’ll need two strips 6.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two strips 8.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ for the sides.

Row one of the log cabin quilt

Row one of the log cabin quilt

Assembling the half log cabin quilt

I decided to put the quilt blocks together with loads of white between them to show up the colours and to provide a complete contrast to the black edging.  This also gives lots of lovely open space for quilting!  Although the log cabin blocks are not square, it is still possible to sew them together in rows.

For rows one and five, place a block at each end vertically and a block in the middle horizontally.  Sew a 16.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangle of white to one side of the vertical blocks.  This is the side with the black edging, so that the central square of the blocks is on the outer edge of the row.  Sew a 16.1/2″ by 7.1/2″ white rectangle to the black edging of the horizontal block.  These three blocks can now be sewn together across the row.  Row five is the same as row one, but with the central block placed so that the white is on top and the log cabin beneath it.

Rows two and four of the log cabin quilt

Rows two and four of the log cabin quilt

Rows two and four are also the same as each other.  You will need two quilt blocks placed vertically.  Sew a 16.1/2″ by 11.1/2″ white rectangle to the sides of the blocks that are not black and place them with the white on the edges of the row.  Sew a 16.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ white strip between the two blocks on the black edging.

Central row of the log cabin quilt

Central row of the log cabin quilt

Row three is the middle row and contains the nine patch unit.  Place two quilt blocks vertically on the ends of the row and sew a 16.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ white rectangle to the black edges of these blocks.

Sew an 8.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ white rectangle to the top and bottom of the nine patch unit.  Sew the three sections together across the row.

Sew the five rows to each other to complete the half log cabin quilt top.  It can now be layered, quilted and bound.

Here’s the video:

 

Longarm quilting

Longarm quilting

I have had more time this week to play with Minnie, my longarm machine.  It has been enormous fun because I really feel that I have achieved something with her.  Next week I feel that I can take the exciting step of putting a real quilt on her rather than just sample panels.  To see how I got on click on longarm quilting.
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