Nine Patch Jelly Roll Quilt Pattern

Nine patch jelly roll quilt

Nine patch jelly roll quilt

For this nine patch jelly roll quilt I wanted to make the entire quilt using just one jelly roll.  I nearly succeeded, only needing to add two strips of fabric from stash for the final border.  However, I know that jelly rolls do vary in the number of strips of fabric, so you may be able to complete this quilt with just the jelly roll.

There are lots of jelly roll quilt patterns, but I find that very often they require a jelly roll plus a lot of extra fabric.  The target that I set myself here was to use one jelly roll only.




Computer image to show the quilt design

Computer image to show the quilt design

If you haven’t come across jelly rolls before, they are rolls of fabric cut to 2.1/2″ wide and the strips all come from one fabric manufacturer so they usually all go together well.  It’s a great way of getting a wide variety of fabric without having to buy individual quantities of each fabric.  Although the strips are always the same width, the number of strips within a jelly roll can vary.

Because the fabrics vary so much, I have included a computer image of the quilt here using just a few colours so that you can see the quilt design more clearly.

Sort the fabric strips

Sort the fabric strips

Preparing the fabric

I began by sorting the strips into broadly dark, medium and light strips.  In fact I used the medium strips as either dark or light depending on what I needed and I also used them for the borders.

Make the stripey block

Make the stripey block

Make the stripey block

Sew together three strips of fabric in dark, light, dark colours.  This made a panel 6.1/2″ wide by the length of the strips.  Cut this at 6.1/2″ intervals to make a simple 6.1/2″ square.  This is the stripey block.  You should get six of these from each panel.  I found that I could also cut one 2.1/2″ strip from each panel.

Make the nine patch quilt block

Make the nine patch quilt block

Making the nine patch quilt block

For this block I needed panels of dark, light, dark fabric as above, but also some light, dark, light panels of fabric.  Cut these at 2.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles of fabric 2.1/2″ wide by 6.1/2″ long.

Place two dark, light, dark strips of fabric with a light, dark, light strip between them as shown in the top right of the photo.  Sew these three strips together to make the nine patch jelly roll quilt block.

Completed blocks

Completed blocks

The completed blocks

Both these quilt blocks are 6.1/2″ square at this stage.  You need to make twenty four of the stripey blocks and thirty nine of the nine patch jelly roll quilt blocks.

In order to do this, I needed to make nine panels of dark, light, dark fabric together with three panels of light, dark, light fabrics.

First three rows of the nine patch jelly roll quilt

Sew the blocks together in nine rows of seven blocks.

First three rows

First three rows

The first row is made with a stripey block at each end and five nine patch blocks between them.  Note that the left hand stripey block is placed with the stripes horizontal while the other stripey block has the stripes vertical.

In the second row the blocks are reversed, with a nine patch block at each end and five stripey blocks between them.  Note that the stripey blocks alternate between horizontal and vertical placements.

For the third row place a three nine patch blocks in the middle with a vertical stripey block either side of them and a nine patch block at each end.

Central area

Central area

Central area of the quilt

The next four rows are very similar to each other.  Each row has three nine patch blocks in the middle and a nine patch block at each end.  Place the stripey blocks in the second and sixth places of each row.

The stripey blocks alternate down the column, beginning with a horizontal block, then vertical beneath it and so on.  This is the only difference between the rows.

Last two rows

Last two rows

Final two rows of the nine patch jelly roll quilt

The last two rows are similar to the first two rows.  For row eight place a nine patch block at each end with five stripey blocks between them.  In row nine place a stripey block at each end with five nine patch blocks between them.  Check whether the stripey blocks are horizontal or vertical.  My intention with the corner blocks was to have them form a sort of circle around the quilt – that’s why they are placed both horizontally and vertically.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows together.  At this stage the quilt top measures 42.1/2″ by 54.1/2″.

Leftover fabric

Leftover fabric

Make the top and bottom quilt borders

Now my target was to use up the remainder of the jelly roll strips for the borders.  I had six complete strips of fabric and some 6.1/2″ strips left.  Note that you may have a different amount left over as jelly rolls do vary.

Top and bottom borders

Top and bottom borders

I decided to make three borders for the top and bottom of the quilt.

For the first border I used a strip of light fabric.  In the second border I used seven of the 6.1/2″ strips – that’s twenty one squares altogether.

I made the third border with a strip of medium fabric.  Sew the three strips together and sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.

Add the side borders

Add the side borders

Make the side borders

By now I was really running short of fabric strips!  I had one light strip left which I didn’t want to use for these borders.  I cut two medium 2.1/2″ strips from my stash and used them with the remaining medium strip and a few individual squares of medium fabric to make two 66.1/2″ lengths for the sides.

That completes the nine patch jelly roll quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Peckforton Castle

Pckforton Castle

My travels last week took me into Staffordshire to somewhere called Peckforton Castle.  What a treat that was!  It’s a genuine castle, although not as old as many of our castles.  It was built in the mid 19th century by a railway magnate for his family.  Outside it looks centuries old but inside there are all mod cons – and two lovely restaurants.

 

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