Half Log Cabin Quilt

Half log cabin quilt

Half log cabin quilt

This half log cabin quilt was inspired by a dress that I saw in a shop in town.  The dress itself was way beyond my price range so obviously I did the next best thing and made a quilt using a similar design.  The basis of the design is a half log cabin, which is the main part of the design that is like the dress that I saw, but I have also included a nine patch unit in the middle just because I felt like it!  The quilt is 42″ wide by 80″ long.  I have used four colours plus black in each colourway and I have made four blocks in each of three different colourways.

This week’s special offer is for just the coloured fabrics of this quilt at 10% discount on the normal fabric price. Click on special offer for more details.

Three versions of the block

Three versions of the block

Fabric requirements for the half log cabin quilt

The amount of fabric used is is best listed as just what you will need for one set of blocks, because total fabric requirements will vary depending on how many colours you use.

So for four blocks I cut one 2.1/2″ strip of the first (lightest) colour, two 2.1/2″ strips each of the second and third colours and three 2.1/2″ strips of the fourth (darkest) colour.  For each four blocks, I used three 1.1/2″ strips of black fabric.  That’s about 1/2 yard total in black.

The white fabric requirements are going to be the same whatever different colours you use:

four rectangles, 4.1/2″ by 16.1/2″, four rectangles 16.1/2″ by 11.1/2″, two rectangles 16.1/2″ by 7.1/2″, two rectangles 16.1/2″ by 2.1/2″, two rectangles 16.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ and two rectangles 4.1/2″ by 8.1/2″.  That’s about 1.1/2 yards total in white fabric.

First round of the half log cabin quilt block

First round of the half log cabin quilt block

Making the half log cabin quilt block

The log cabin quilt block usually begins with square in the middle (representing the hearth of the log cabin), surrounded by strips of fabric (the logs) which are sewn on around this central square in either a clockwise or an anti clockwise direction.  For this block the starting point is a 2.1/2″ square, but the logs are only added on three sides.  They are added in an anti clockwise direction, so the first log is sewn to the top of the square, the next one to the left hand side and the third one across the bottom.  Then the process is repeated with another colour which is darker.

Begin with a 2.1/2″ square of the lightest colour.  This will be the centre of the log cabin, although it will stay on the right hand side of the block as we are only adding logs on three sides..

The first frame around it consists of a 2.1/2″ square placed above the central square, a 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangle down the left hand side and a 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangle across the bottom.

Second frame of the half log cabin

Second frame of the half log cabin

Fourth frame of the half log cabin quilt block

Fourth frame of the half log cabin quilt block

The next frame will be made using colour three.  You will need a 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip across the top, 8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip down the left hand side and a 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip across the bottom.  Sew them on in that order to the previous frame.

The fourth colour is added in another frame around the block.  You will need a 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip across the top, a 12.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip down the left hand side and an 8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strip across the bottom.

Add black for the last frame of the log cabin quilt block

Add black for the last frame of the log cabin quilt block

That completes the colour section of this half log cabin quilt block.  The final round for all of them is made using 1.1/2″ strips of black fabric.  You’ll need one strip 8.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ across the top, one strip 15.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ down the left hand side and one strip 9.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ across the bottom.

Make four of these blocks in this first colour and then four more in each of two more colours – twelve log cabin quilt blocks in total.

Make a nine patch unit for the middle

Make a nine patch unit for the middle

Making the nine patch unit

I felt that the quilt needed something different in the middle, so I made a nine patch unit using squares left over from all three of the colours, with a black 2.1/2″ square in the centre.

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Completed nine patch unit

Completed nine patch unit

Finally, sew a black frame around this nine patch unit – you’ll need two strips 6.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two strips 8.1/2″ by 1.1/2″ for the sides.

Row one of the log cabin quilt

Row one of the log cabin quilt

Assembling the half log cabin quilt

I decided to put the quilt blocks together with loads of white between them to show up the colours and to provide a complete contrast to the black edging.  This also gives lots of lovely open space for quilting!  Although the log cabin blocks are not square, it is still possible to sew them together in rows.

For rows one and five, place a block at each end vertically and a block in the middle horizontally.  Sew a 16.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ rectangle of white to one side of the vertical blocks.  This is the side with the black edging, so that the central square of the blocks is on the outer edge of the row.  Sew a 16.1/2″ by 7.1/2″ white rectangle to the black edging of the horizontal block.  These three blocks can now be sewn together across the row.  Row five is the same as row one, but with the central block placed so that the white is on top and the log cabin beneath it.

Rows two and four of the log cabin quilt

Rows two and four of the log cabin quilt

Rows two and four are also the same as each other.  You will need two quilt blocks placed vertically.  Sew a 16.1/2″ by 11.1/2″ white rectangle to the sides of the blocks that are not black and place them with the white on the edges of the row.  Sew a 16.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ white strip between the two blocks on the black edging.

Central row of the log cabin quilt

Central row of the log cabin quilt

Row three is the middle row and contains the nine patch unit.  Place two quilt blocks vertically on the ends of the row and sew a 16.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ white rectangle to the black edges of these blocks.

Sew an 8.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ white rectangle to the top and bottom of the nine patch unit.  Sew the three sections together across the row.

Sew the five rows to each other to complete the half log cabin quilt top.  It can now be layered, quilted and bound.

Here’s the video:

 

Longarm quilting

Longarm quilting

I have had more time this week to play with Minnie, my longarm machine.  It has been enormous fun because I really feel that I have achieved something with her.  Next week I feel that I can take the exciting step of putting a real quilt on her rather than just sample panels.  To see how I got on click on longarm quilting.
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Stars in Their Eyes Quilt

Stars in their eyes quilt

Stars in their eyes quilt

I’ve used a star quilt block and another block in two different colours to make this quilt and it gives a pretty overall effect.  Both the blocks are simple ones and the star comes together quite quickly.  It is 60″ square and I have used 1/4 yard of the blue star fabric, 1/2 yard each of the yellow and pink star fabrics,  3/4 yard of the green star fabric, 1 yard of the light pink fabric and 1.1/4 yards each of the white and light green fabric.  You can buy all these fabrics as a kit at a discount of 10% off the normal fabric price. Click on this week’s special offer.

Star quilt block

Star quilt block

Cutting requirements for the five star quilt blocks

6.1/2″ squares:  five yellow

3.7/8″ squares:  ten each in blue and white, twenty each in yellow and white

 

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the evening star quilt block

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units which are 3.1/2″ squares.

Star quilt block layout

Star quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in four rows of four – well it would be if you count the yellow square in the centre as four squares.  There’s a blue/white half square triangle in each corner, the 6.1/2″ yellow square in the middle and yellow/white half square triangles everywhere else.  Note that the white triangles are placed so that they form a larger white triangle on each edge of the star quilt block, pointing in towards the middle.

Sew the squares in pairs

Sew the squares in pairs

Sew the squares together in pairs – in rows one and four they can be sewn in pairs across the rows, but in the middle the two half square triangles are sewn together vertically so that they are then the right size to sew to the large square.

Sew all the rows to each other to complete the evening star quilt block.

Green quilt block

Green quilt block

The next quilt block is a version of the new album block, but I’ve added a few extra half square triangles in.  You will need to make twelve green blocks and eight pink blocks.

Cutting requirements for the twelve green quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares: forty eight yellow

3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  twenty four yellow

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty four each in green star and white, twenty four each in green star and yellow

Cutting requirements for the eight pink quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty two light pink

3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles: sixteen light pink

3.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in pink star and white, sixteen each in light pink and pink star

Alternative quilt block layout

Alternative quilt block layout

Making the alternative quilt blocks

Make half square triangles with all the 3.7/8″ squares in the colour combinations listed above.  Lay the squares out in four rows of four.  There’s a green/white half square triangle in each corner with the green on the outside.  The 6.1/2″ rectangles are placed across rows one and four between the corner squares.  Rows two and three are the same as each other with a yellow square at each end of the row and two green/yellow half square triangles in the middle.  These are placed to form a diamond shape in the middle of the quilt block.

Pink quilt block layout

Pink quilt block layout

The layout for the pink quilt blocks is the same.

Sew the patchwork squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt blocks.

 

Assembling the quilt

You will now have twenty five quilt blocks in total and these are sewn together in five rows of five.

Layout for the stars in their eyes quilt

Layout for the stars in their eyes quilt

Rows one and five have an evening star quilt block at each end with a pink block in the middle and a green block on either side of the pink.

Rows two and four have a green block at each end and in the middle with pink blocks in the remaining spaces.

The third row is the middle row and this has a star block in the middle with a green block on either side of it and a pink block at each end.

Sew the quilt blocks together across the rows and then sew the rows to each other to complete the stars in their eyes quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Samantha

Samantha

Quilting has had to take backstage this week while my daughter has been home.  As you can see, she has been revising hard for her accountancy exams!

My eldest son and his fiancee are arriving tonight for the weekend so we will have a lovely full house.

I have two different new needles to try on Minnie (my longarm quilting machine) and I’m hoping that one or both of these will iron out the last few problems – I’ll be sure to let you know how I get on with these.

 

Craftsy

Quarter Square Triangle Quilt


Quarter square triangle quilt

Quarter square triangle quilt

The quarter square triangle quilt is a very simple but quite striking when fabrics with a strong contrast are used.  I’ve seen this design on vintage quilts before now and what struck me about it was the way the triangles are facing:  on the sides the dark triangles face outwards but on the top and bottom the dark triangles face inwards.  What this means is that if you rotate the block next to this, you’ll have two rows of triangles facing the same way – almost like a sashing between the blocks.  The quilt is made entirely from either half square or quarter square triangles and it measures 40″ square, making it a decent sized lap quilt.  I have used 1 yard each of both the black and the white.

Cutting requirements for the quarter square triangle quilt

2.7/8″ squares:  fifty six black, fifty six white

13.1/4″ squares:  two black, two white

2.1/2″ strips for the borders:  four strips each of black and white, cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Sew the triangles in rows

Sew the triangles in rows

Making one quarter of the quilt

Make half square triangles with the 2.7/8″ squares.  Place a black and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are 2.1/2″ squares.  Sew these half square triangle units together first in pairs so that they create one larger dark triangle with each pair of squares.  Then sew these larger triangles together in two rows of three triangles and two rows of four triangles.  Put these to one side for the moment.

Make quarter square triangles

Make quarter square triangles

One completed quarter square triangle unit

One completed quarter square triangle unit

Place a black and a white 13.1/4″ square with right sides together and make two half square triangle units as above.  Then take the two half square triangle units and place them right sides together.  Place them so that the white of one square is against the black of the other square.  Mark a line along the diagonal that crosses both white and black.  Sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line and when you cut along the line you will have two quarter square triangles which are both 12.1/2″ squares.  You need one of these for each quarter of the quilt.

 

Sew strips of triangles around the block

Sew strips of triangles around the block

Sew one strip of three small triangles to the top and one to the bottom of the quarter square triangle unit.  Sew one strip of four small triangles to each side.  Note that the black triangles at the top and bottom of the block are pointing outwards and the black triangles on the sides are pointing inwards.  This means that you are sewing the black edge of the strips to the big white triangles and the white edges of the strips to the big black triangles.

Sew the four quilt blocks together

Sew the four quilt blocks together

Completing the quarter square triangle quilt

Make four blocks the same and sew them together in pairs.  Notice that the quarter square triangles are rotated so that in each pair of quilt blocks the big black triangles are horizontal in one of the blocks and vertical in the other one.

Sew the two pairs of blocks together, checking the photo to see that you have the horizontal quarter square triangles diagonally opposite each other.

Two quilt borders

Two quilt borders

I’ve added two borders to this quilt, both made from 2.1/2″ strips.  The first border is made from black strips.  You will need two lengths of 32.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the sides.  The second border is made from white strips.  You will need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

The quarter square triangle quilt top is now complete and ready for layering, quilting and binding.  You can find full details of these steps in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

 

 

Propeller Quilt Pattern


 

Propeller quilt

Propeller quilt

The propeller quilt block is a simple enough one and I have just added a bit more for the eye to follow by changing the colours in a few of the blocks to create an inner red diamond.  The quilt measures 46″ square and I have used a yard each of the black and white fabrics with 3/4 yard of red.  The black requirement is exactly 36″, so you might be safer to buy a bit more than a yard to be safe.  There are thirteen quilt blocks and they are laid out in a diagonal setting.

Cutting requirements for the propeller quilt

4.7/8″ squares:  twenty six each in black and white

2.1/2″ squares:  sixty five white, thirty six black and sixteen red – don’t cut these yet as they can be strip pieced

7.7/8″ squares: two red cut along one diagonal for the corner triangles

10.7/8″ squares:  four red cut along one diagonal for the infill triangles

For the border you will need four 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the half square triangles

Use the 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a white square with a black square and mark a line along one diagonal.  Sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units for each pair of squares.

Press the seam allowance towards the black and trim the corners of the squares.  These should now be 4.1/2″ squares.

Strip piecing the small squares

Strip piecing the small squares

Strip piecing the small squares

Some time can be saved by strip piecing the 2.1/2″ squares.  Sew together lengths of white with either black or red.  Press the seam allowance towards the dark fabric and cut at 2.1/2″ intervals to make strips which are 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ of white and either black or red.

For the entire quilt you will need to do this with one strip of white/red and three strips of black/white.

Making the propeller quilt blocks

Propeller quilt block layout

Propeller quilt block layout

There are three slightly different versions of the same propeller block within the quilt.  You will need five of the first one, which is entirely black and white.  Lay the squares out as shown in three rows.  There is a half square triangle in each corner, a white square in the middle and a black and a white square together in each of the remaining spaces.  The black squares are placed around the central square with the white squares on the outside.  Note that all the half square triangles are placed facing in different directions from each other.

Sew the patches together across each row.  Finally sew the rows to each other to complete the propeller quilt block.

Second version of the propeller quilt block

Second version of the propeller quilt block

The second and third versions of the quilt block both have two of the black squares replaced by red ones.

For the second version, replace the two black squares to the right and below the central square with red squares.

Sew the squares together across the rows as for the first version and then sew the rows to each other.

You will need four of this version of the block.

Third version of the propeller quilt block

Third version of the propeller quilt block

Three completed versions of the propeller quilt block

Three completed versions of the propeller quilt block

For the third version, replace two of the black squares with red squares again, but this time replace the ones to the right and left of the central square, so that they are in line along the central row of the block.

Sew the squares and rows together as before.  You will need to make four of this version of the propeller quilt block.

On the right you can see all three versions of the propeller quilt block completed.

First row of the propeller quilt

First row of the propeller quilt

Assembling the propeller quilt

As this quilt is set on the diagonal, the layout begins in the top left corner of the quilt with a corner triangle – that’s one half of a 7.7/8″ red square.  Beneath this place a black and white propeller quilt block with an infill triangle on each side of it – that’s one half of the 10.7/8″ squares.  Sew the quilt block and two triangles together and then add the corner triangle above the quilt block.

Second row of the propeller quilt

Second row of the propeller quilt

The second row is made with three quilt blocks and two infill triangles.  This time the central quilt block is the third version, with a second version of the block on either side and then the infill triangles outside these.  Check the photo to see which way the red squares should be placed.  Just rotate the block until your red squares match up with the photo.

Third row of the propeller quilt

Third row of the propeller quilt

The third row is the middle row of the quilt and it is made using five quilt blocks and two corner triangles.  I couldn’t fit the entire row in a photo, but the first, third and fifth quilt blocks are the plain black and white blocks while the second and fourth blocks are the third version, placed so that the red squares are in a downward line.  You can see that they are continuing the red line begun in the second row above them.  Note that the corner triangles are sewn on to the blocks by the longest edge of the triangle.

The fourth row of the propeller quilt

The fourth row of the propeller quilt

The fourth row contains three quilt blocks and two infill triangles.  The quilt blocks are the third version in the middle of the row with a second version on either side of it.  See how the blocks are rotated so that the red squares now complete the outline of a square.

This photo is probably the best one to  show which way the infill triangles should be placed.  In the first and second rows, the infill triangles are placed so that the longest edge of the triangle is on the outside (forming the edge of the quilt) and the right angled corners (the square corners) are sewn to the bottom of the quilt block.  After the central row, in rows four and five, the infill triangles are still placed so that the longest edge is on the outside, but this time the square corner is sewn to the top of the quilt block.

Fifth row of the propeller quilt

Fifth row of the propeller quilt

Finally the last row is another corner unit the same as the first row – one plain black and white propeller quilt block with an infill triangle on either side and a corner triangle beneath it.  Sew all the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Propeller quilt border

Propeller quilt border

As all the outside edges of this quilt are cut on the bias (the diagonal cut across the squares) they are liable to stretch so it’s a good idea to get the border on as quickly as possible to stabilise the edge.  I have used 2.1/2″ strips of black fabric for this.  You will need two lengths of 42.1/2″ for the first two edges and two lengths of 46.1/2″ for the remaining two edges, but do check your own measurements before you cut these lengths.

The propeller quilt top is now complete and ready for layering, quilting and binding.  You can find full details of these steps in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Double cross quilt kit

Double cross quilt kit

This week I have made the weekly  special offer quilt kit (10% off the normal fabric price) for the double cross quilt.  This is actually one of my Craftsy patterns, suitable for a queen sized bed and you will get the printed pattern included if you buy the kit.  I only have a few of these kits, so it’s first come, first served.

 

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Square and Half Quilt


 

Square and a half quilt

Square and a half quilt

The square and a half quilt (I know it’s not a very imaginative name!) is made using one quilt block only but it has the look of a quilt carefully designed with two very different blocks.  I just love it when that happens.  I’ve used nine square and a half quilt blocks to make this 55″ square quilt, using 3/4 yard of green, 1 yard each of dark blue and white, with 1.1/4 yards of light blue.  Once again I am offering these fabrics as a kit with 10% off the fabric price for the next few days.  Click here for details.

Cutting requirements for the square and a half quilt

3.7/8″ squares:  fifty four each in dark blue and white

3.1/2″ squares:  nine green, thirty six white, thirty six light blue

4.1/4″ squares:  eighteen green, nine light blue, nine dark blue

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a white square and a dark blue square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangles which are 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowance towards the dark fabric and trim the corners of the square.  Put these to one side now so that they don’t get confused with the quarter square triangles made in the next step.

Make quarter square triangles

Make quarter square triangles

Completed quarter square triangle units

Completed quarter square triangle units

Making the quarter square triangle units

Use the 4.1/4″ squares to make half square triangles as above, using one green square with either a light blue or a dark blue square.

Place one green/light blue half square triangle right sides together with a green/dark blue half square triangle.  Make sure that the green on one square is placed against the blue in the other square.  Mark a line along the other diagonal – so that it crosses the seam.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This produces two quarter square triangles which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Each one has two green quarters opposite each other and a light blue and a dark blue quarter opposite each other.

Inner part of the square and a half quilt block

Inner part of the square and a half quilt block

Making the square and a half quilt block

I think it will be easier to see the layout of the block if I show you the middle first.  This is nine patches with a green square in the middle, a light blue square in each corner and a quarter square triangle unit against each edge of the central square.  Note that these are placed so that the dark blue triangle is always along the edge of the green square.

Square and a half quilt block layout

Square and a half quilt block layout

Now it’s a simple matter to add the outer layer of the quilt block.  There’s a white square in the middle of each edge and dark blue/white half square triangles everywhere else.  These are placed so that the dark blue triangles seem to cut across the corner of the block.  In each corner there are three half square triangles and these are placed so that the triangles are facing the same way as each other in each corner.

Sew the squares together across each of the five rows and then sew the rows to each other.  You will need nine of these quilt blocks.

Assembling the square and a half quilt

This is a terribly easy quilt layout – just sew the quilt blocks together in three rows of three.

First two quilt borders

First two quilt borders

Quilt border

I have used three borders to frame this quilt.  The first border is made using 2.1/2″ strips of light blue fabric.  You will need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

For the second border I have used 1.1/2″ strips of the green fabric.  Make two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the sides.

Third quilt border

Third quilt border

Finally, for the third border I have returned to the 2.1/2″ strips of light blue fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 55.1/2″ for the sides.

The square and a half quilt top is now complete and ready for layering, quilting and binding.  More details on these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

 

Here’s the video:

Thanks so much for all your wonderful suggestions for a name for my longarm machine.  It was a real treat to read them and I really appreciate so many of you taking the time to write in with ideas.  It was extremely difficul to choose, but I have decided to go with Minnie as my name for her.  It works on several levels – trips off the tongue whether I am pleased or annoyed with her, she is definitely not ‘mini’, and it’s a shortening of minion.  I’m still working on the last bit – she is most definitely the boss at the moment.  I have been trying to work with her a little each day and I definitely feel better about her now than I did a week ago.  My movements still seem a little jerky – but I can hardly blame that on her!
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Arts and Crafts Quilt


Arts and crafts quilt

Arts and crafts quilt

This is a Fabric Freedom quilt pattern designed to showcase another beautiful fabric range.  It looks complex, but as so often it can be broken down into small steps which are not nearly as difficult as they look.  The more you look, the more you see in the design. The quilt measures 60″ square and I have used 1.1/4 yards of white fabric, 3/4 yard of the green fabric in block one and 1 yard of the patterned fabric in block one.  For block two I have used 1/2 yard each of the red fabric, the patterned fabric and the small red flowers fabric.

Cutting requirements for quilt block one

6.1/2″ squares:  twenty six in the patterned fabric

4.7/8″ squares:  twenty six in the green fabric

4.1/4″ squares:  fifty two white

Cutting requirements for quilt block two

3.1/2″ squares:  forty eight in red patterned fabric

3.7/8″ squares: forty eight white

4.3/4″ squares:  twenty four each in red and red/green fabric – but don’t cut these yet as they can be made with strip piecing.

Cut the white squares along the diagonal

Cut the white squares along the diagonal

Place the triangles around the square

Place the triangles around the square

Making quilt block one

For the first quilt block you need to make a diamond in a square – this is done by adding a triangle to each side of a square.

Cut the 4.1/4″ white squares along one diagonal to form triangles and place one triangle along each edge of the green square.  These can be sewn on in two pairs.

Sew triangles to opposite sides

Sew triangles to opposite sides

Sew the remaining triangles

Sew the remaining triangles

With right sides together, sew the first pair of triangles to opposite sides of the square.  The triangle edges are longer than the edges of the square and will extend beyond the square when you sew them.  Make sure that the triangle edges stick out by the same amount on each end of the square.

Press the seam allowance away from the square.  You can trim the corners at this stage but I personally prefer to leave them there and do all the trimming at the end.

Sew the remaining two triangles to the square, press and trim the resulting square.  It should be a 6.1/2″ square now.

You will need twenty six of these diamond in a square blocks.

Make a four patch unit

Make a four patch unit

Quilt block one complete

Quilt block one complete

Sew each 6.1/2″ patterned square together with a diamond in square.  Make a four patch unit with two pairs of squares, placing them so that the patterned squares are diagonally opposite each other.

This is a completed quilt block one. Make thirteen of these.

 

Sew strips of fabric together

Sew strips of fabric together

Sew the pairs of squares together

Sew the pairs of squares together

Making quilt block two

The second quilt block is similar in that it forms a diamond in a square, but the middle of the block is a four patch unit rather than a single square.  Strip piecing is the quickest way to make this four patch.  Sew together 4.3/4″ strips of red fabric and patterned fabric along the length.  Cut these panels at 4.3/4″ intervals to make strips that are made of a square each of the red and the patterned.

Sew two of these pairs of squares together, placing them so that the red squares are diagonally opposite each other.  Make twelve of these.

Cut the white squares along the diagonal

Cut the white squares along the diagonal

Make the large triangle

Make the large triangle

For the triangles to go on the edges of the four patch unit I came up with a super duper idea using strip piecing that would speed things up.  The only problem was that it didn’t work and I got myself in a right muddle.  So, I shall show you the simplest and most obvious way of making these triangles.

Cut the 3.7/8″ white squares along one diagonal to make two triangles.  Sew two triangles on two edges of the 3.1/2″ patterned square.  Note that the right angled corners (the square corners) are on the bottom left of both the triangles.  This will give you one large triangle.  Make forty eight of these.

Sew a triangle to each edge of the four patch

Sew a triangle to each edge of the four patch

Match the seams

Match the seams

Sew two triangles to two opposite edges of the four patch unit – just the same as you did for the diamond in a square in the first quilt block.  Press and then sew the remaining two triangles to the other two edges of the four patch.

When you are sewing the triangles on, match the corner of the square with the seam between the squares on the four patch as shown on the right.

Quilt block two complete

Quilt block two complete

That completes quilt block two and you will need twelve of these.  If you are using a directional fabric, as I have, then you need to decide whether you want the corner squares all to face in the same direction or not.  I have made them so that two have the lines horizontal and two have the lines vertical.  This was achieved by sewing all the squares the same way when I made the triangles.  If you wanted to have them all  horizontal then you would need to rotate half the squares before you sewed them into the triangles.  (I hope that makes sense).

Alternate the quilt blocks

Alternate the quilt blocks

Assembling the Arts and Crafts quilt

It is a simple job now to assemble the quilt.  You have twenty five quilt blocks and they are sewn together in five rows of five blocks.  Begin the first row with quilt block one and then alternate the blocks across the row.

Begin row two with quilt block two and then alternate the blocks across the row.  This way you will get the quilt blocks alternating across each row and also down each column.  Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

This completes the arts and crafts quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding, full details of which can be found towards the bottom of the beginner quilting page.

I have made up a couple of quilt kits for this quilt – all the fabric required to make the quilt top at a discount of 10% from the price of the fabrics if they were bought individually.  First come, first served so do take a look at this special offer.

Here’s the video:

To see how I quilted the Arts and Crafts quilt, click here.

Today I am having a complete break from quilting – I’m off to the Hay Literary Festival this afternoon to see talks by Johnny Vegas, Helena Attlee and Al Murray.  It should be a really amusing afternoon – and I hope the area isn’t as wet and muddy as it was the day that I went last year.
Craftsy

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