Travel Jewellery Roll Pattern

Travel jewellery roll

Travel jewellery roll

This travel jewellery roll pattern was requested a long time ago and I feel ashamed that it has taken me this long to make one, but here it is at last.  I think that the problem is that I don’t wear much jewellery myself so the pattern took a while to rise to the top of my to do list.

I’ve made the roll small enough so that it doesn’t take up much space – about 3″ by 8″ when rolled but there’s plenty of padding for the jewels and I think that it is a very secure roll.

You can buy the kit to make the jewellery roll in this week’s special offer.




 

Jewellery roll wrapped up

Jewellery roll wrapped up

Cutting requirements for the travel jewellery roll

Two rectangles 17″ by 12″ – one in top fabric and one in lining fabric – I’ve used two cotton fabrics

One rectangle 9″ by 12″ in wadding

Two rectangles 4.1/2″ by 13″ in a contrasting fabric for the compartments – I’ve used red.

Three safety fasteners – I call them pressed studs.

Cut the corners off

Cut the corners off

Make the basic roll

Lay the two largest rectangles out with the 17″ edge along the top.  Mark a line 4″ in from each side.  These two lines are down the rectangle.  Mark a line 3″ down from the top of each rectangle and another line 6″ down from the top.  These two lines are across the rectangle.

The lines will now mark out a 3″ by 4″ rectangle in the top two corners of the rectangle and also a 6″ by 4″ rectangle in the bottom two corners.  Cut these corners out so that you are left with the central shape shown in the photo.

Layer the rectangles

Layer the rectangles

Lay the rectangles out with the wadding first then the lining fabric with right side up.  On top lay the main fabric with right side down.

Leave a gap in the stitching

Leave a gap in the stitching

Sew the three layers together around the outside edge of the shape.  Leave a gap of about 3″ on one side so that you can turn the project right side out later.  You can see the trailing threads on the right of the photo showing where I left a gap.

Clip across the corners where the angle is outwards and clip in towards the stitching on those corners where the angle is inwards.

Pin the gap

Pin the gap

Turn the project right side out through the gap, gently pushing the corners out.  Turn under a small hem across the gap and pin – don’t sew it yet.

Add the compartments

The compartments are formed by a red rectangle pinned to the top and the bottom of the main rectangle.  Turn under and sew a small hem on all four edges of the red rectangles first.

Pin the red for the compartments

Pin the red for the compartments

With the right side up, pin the first red rectangle to the bottom of the lining rectangle.  Line the ends up with the edges of the lining fabric along the sides.  The red rectangle is slightly longer than the main jewellery roll rectangle.  This is intentional, so that you can have some space to place your jewellery in at the top of each compartment.

I need four compartments so I have pinned the red to the lining at three places across its length – roughly at 3″ intervals.  Each time I have used two pins and raised the red fabric slightly between the two pins.  At the bottom of the red rectangle flatten this spare fabric to form a mini pleat.

Add the second red rectangle

Add the second red rectangle

Repeat with the other red rectangle at the top of the jewellery roll lining.  You now have four compartments at the top and at the bottom.  They all open towards the middle which I felt was the most secure way to place them.

Sew all round the edge of the main rectangle of the project – don’t include the tabs in this seam.  This secures the three layers of the main rectangle in place, secures the red rectangles on three sides and also closes the original gap left from when you turned the project right side out.  So it’s quite an important seam!

Roll up fabric for the rings

Roll up fabric for the rings

Make the ring roll

I wanted to make a separate section for rings so that there was no chance of them slipping out.

Use a spare rectangle of fabric – I used one about 5″ by 7″ from the outer fabric.  Turn under and press a small hem along the two long edges.  Fold the two short edges in towards the middle and roll the fabric up.  This gives you a roll about 7″ long.

Secure the ring roll

Secure the ring roll

Slipstitch the edge of the roll so that it doesn’t unroll.  Position the roll so that it’s midway between the top and bottom edges of the jewellery roll.  Sew one end to the red fabric.  Sew a snap fastener on the other end to make a closure for the other end of the ring roll.  Now you can undo the snap fastener to place your rings on the roll and then fasten it to stop them slipping off.

Fold the jewellery roll

Fold the jewellery roll

Finish the travel jewellery roll

Fold the sections of the jewellery roll to give its final layout.  I fold the left hand panel first, then the two panels on the right.

Fold the tabs down or up and secure them in place with a snap fastener on each tab.  You could use ribbon or buttons to secure the jewellery roll closed, but I felt that snap fasteners were the easiest and most secure way to do it.

I hope you find this jewellery roll pattern helpful – one of those projects that would make a great gift.

Here’s the video:

Birmingham's oldest statue

Birmingham’s oldest statue

There are loads of statues in Birmingham but I was quite surprised to see which one of them was considered to be the oldest.  This one is of King George I who died in 1722.  The statue was commissioned by the City of Dublin who then sold it 200 years later to the Barber Institute of Fine Art in 1937.  You can just see the edge of the Barber building on the right of the photo.

 

It’s a lovely statue and provides a great welcome to anyone visiting that section of the University.

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