London Underground Quilt Pattern

London Underground quilt

London Underground quilt

The London Underground quilt pattern is based on the fabric used in the seating on a lot of the carriages.  While sitting there waiting to reach my destination I couldn’t help noticing what a good quilt design the seating would make.

Original seating design

Original seating design

The rectangular quilt measures 63″ by 83″, using 1.1/4 yards of white fabric, 2.1/2 yards of red and 3.1/2 yards of blue.  The quilt uses two different but very simple blocks and I’ve used twelve of the first block and six of the second.  They all measure 14″ square.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




 

London underground quilt blocks completed

London underground quilt blocks completed

Cutting requirements for the London underground quilt

2,1/2″ squares:  ninety six blue, fifty four red, ninety six white

10.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips:  twenty four blue

14.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips:  twelve blue

6.1/2″ by 14.1/2″ rectangles:  twelve blue

2.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ strips:  twelve blue, forty eight white

10.1/4″ squares:  one red

14.7/8″ squares:  five red

For the border you will need to cut seven 2.1/2″ blue strips across the width of fabric.

Make the first block

This first block contains four red squares and a broken white frame while the second block is just one red square on a blue background.

First block layout

First block layout

The first block contains seven rows.  In rows one and seven place a 6.1/2″ white strip on either side with a blue square in the middle.

Rows two and six are made with a white square at each end and a 10.1/2″ blue strip in the middle.

For rows three and five you need alternating squares:  white, blue, red, blue, red, blue, white.

Finally row four, the central row contains just a 14.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ blue strip.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It measures 14.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make twelve of them.

Second quilt block layout

Second quilt block layout

Make the second block

The second block is even more easy to make.  Place a 14.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ blue rectangle at top and bottom.  For the middle row place a 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ blue rectangle either side of a red square.

Sew the pieces of the middle row together first and then sew all three pieces to each other.

The block also measures 14.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make six of them.

Cut the triangles

Cut the triangles

The triangles

In addition to the quilt blocks, this design also needs red triangles in the corners and at each end of the rows.

For the corners I have used a 10.1/2″ red square cut across both diagonals to make four triangles.  At the ends of each row a bigger triangle is needed:  I have used 14.7/8″ squares cut along one diagonal only.  I know that the red squares look the wrong size relative to each other, but that’s for the simple reason that I miscalculated and used half size squares before I realised my mistake.

Rows 1,2 and 3

Rows 1, 2 and 3

First 4 rows of the London underground quilt

I have used a diagonal setting for this quilt.  That means that the layout begins in the top left hand corner of the quilt, rather than being made up of horizontal rows of blocks.

I am counting row one as the red corner triangle at the top of the photo.  This comes from a 10.1/4″ red square.  Make row two with a 4 square block beneath the corner triangle and a red side triangle (from 14.7/8″ squares) on either side of it.  Check the photo to be sure of the placement of these triangles – the right angle (square) corner of the triangle is placed against the bottom of the quilt block.

Make row three with three blocks and a red side triangle at each end.  Now you can see the sides of the quilt beginning to form – the red triangles are forming straight lines away from the corner triangle.

I find it safest to sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other as I go rather than waiting until I have laid out all the blocks.  That way I can be sure that the blocks are alternating both across the rows and down the columns.

Add row 4

Add row 4

Lay out three of the first block alternating with  two of the second block alternating for the fourth row.  On the left hand end of the row place a red side triangle.

Corner triangle on row 4

Corner triangle on row 4

At the other end of the row place a red corner triangle.  This corner triangle forms the top right hand corner – the next row will start to form the right hand edge of the quilt.

Row five

Row five

Last 4 rows of the London underground quilt

Make row five also with three of the first block alternating with two of the second block.  This time you need to place a red corner triangle at the left hand end of the row.

End of row five

End of row five

On the right hand end of row place a red side triangle.  Note that this time the square corner of the red side triangle is placed against the top of the block beside it.

Row six

Row six

Now the rows of the quilt are reducing in size, forming the bottom right hand section of the quilt.  So row six contains only three quilt blocks with a red side triangle at each end.

Rows 7 and 8

Rows 7 and 8

Rows seven and eight are very similar to the first two rows.  For row seven you need one single block with a side triangle at each end.  Row eight is the final corner triangle.

If you haven’t been doing this as you go along, sew the blocks and triangles together across the rows and then sew the rows to each other.

Use blue for the border

Use blue for the border

Add the quilt border

As there are so many triangles along the edges of the London Underground quilt there’s quite a danger of the fabric stretching a little.  So it’s a good idea to add the border as soon as possible.  I’ve used 2.1/2″ strips of blue fabric.  Do measure your own quilt, but for my quilt I used two lengths of 59.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 83.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the London Underground quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

View from Frankley Beeches

View from Frankley Beeches

Although I have lived in Birmingham for a few years now, I am constantly coming across places that are completely new to me.  Last week I was told about a place called Frankley Beeches, just a few miles from here.

At the very top of the hill there’s a small area of beech trees and the view from there is stunning.  You can see down the fields to Frankley Reservoir with Brimingham spread out behind it.  The wood is run by the National Trust.  Apparently on a good day you can see right across to the Berwyn Range in Wales, 70 miles away.  I was also told that the next point to the east as high as Frankley Beeches is in the Ural Mountains in Russia!

Sock Pattern Quilt

Sock pattern quilt

Sock pattern quilt

Don’t laugh, but the sock pattern quilt this week comes to you courtesy of a pair of socks that I fell in love with earlier this week.  I’ve made the quilt a little larger than the socks (74″ by 51″) but it’s one of those quilts that you can make smaller or larger fairly easily.  It’s made in rows using quilt blocks of different sizes from row to row, but they are always the same size within a row.

It reminds me slightly of the Arran sweaters that my mother used to knit for my father when I was a child – although in totally different colours.




Quilt with socks

Quilt with socks

I’ve used 1/2 yard each of the blue, pink and purple batik fabrics with 3/4 yard of white and 2.3/4 yards of black fabric.  I did wonder whether to use a solid black, but now that the quilt is finished I am glad that I used a patterned black.  I think that it softens the design.  As usual, you can buy these fabrics at a reduced price in this week’s special offer.

Completed blocks for the sock pattern quilt

Completed blocks for the sock pattern quilt

Cutting requirements for the sock pattern quilt

I have listed the 2.1/2″ squares here, but in fact I saved time by cutting rectangles as I made the blocks:  a 4.1/2″ strip for two squares, a 6.1/2″ strip for three squares, an 8.1/2″ strip for four squares.

Blue block:  one hundred and twelve black 2.1/2″ squares, thirty two blue 2.1/2″ squares, twenty four each 2.7/8″ squares in both blue and black

Pink block:  one hundred and ninety two 2.1/2″ black squares, sisty four 2.1/2″ squares

Purple block:  forty eight 2.1/2″ squares in both black and purple, sixteen 2.7/8″ squares in both black and purple

For the sashing you will need five 1.1/2″ strips of white 64.1/2″ long

For the black borders you will need in 2.1/2″ lengths of black:  two @64.1/2″, two @ 45.1/2″, two @ 70.1/2″ and two @ 51.1/2″ long

For the white border you will need in 1.1/2″ strips of white:  two@ 68.1/2″, two at 47.1/2″ long

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Sock pattern quilt – the blue blocks

Make half square triangle units using the 2.7/8″ squares:  place a black square and a blue square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will give you two half square triangle units which are now 2.1/2″ squares.  You will also need to make these for the purple block.

Blue block layout

Blue block layout

Lay the squares out in six rows.  As I mentioned above, instead of using squares all the time, I have used a 16.1/2″ black strip at the top and bottom, 4.1/2″ black strips in the second and fifth rows and 4.1/2″ blue strips in the second and fifth rows.  This saves time when you’re sewing everything together.  Take care with the half square triangles to be sure that you have them correctly placed.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block. The block measures 16.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ now and you need to make four of these.

Pink block layout

Pink block layout

Sock pattern quilt – the pink blocks

This is a very quick block to make.  In the first row I’ve used 6.1/2″ black strips with a 4.1/2″ pink strip.  In the second row I’ve used three 4.1/2″ black strips.  In the third row I’ve used an 8.1/2″ black strip and in the fourth row I’ve used a 12.1/2″ black strip.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows together to complete the block.  The block measures 16.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ and you need to make eight of these.

Purple block layout

Purple block layout

Sock pattern quilt – the purple blocks

Make half square triangle units as above with all the 2.7/8″ squares.

In the first row I have used a 12.1/2″ purple strip.  In the second row I have used an 8.1/2″ black strip.  In the third row I’ve used 4.1/2″ strips of both black and purple and in the fourth row I’ve used 6.1/2″ black strips.  There are two half square triangles in each row, placed so that the purple forms a large triangle, with a smaller black triangle on either side.

The block measures 16.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ and you will need to make four of these.

Sew sashing between the rows

Sew sashing between the rows

Assembling the sock pattern quilt

Sew the blocks together in rows of four – one row of four blue blocks, one row of four purple blocks and two rows of four pink blocks.

Sew the rows together using the 1.1/2″ white sashing strips.  Begin with a sashing strip, then a pink row with the triangles pointing up, then a sashing strip then the blue row then another sashing strip.

Final rows of the sock pattern quilt

Final rows of the sock pattern quilt

Continue with the purple row (triangles pointing down), then another sashing strip, the final pink row (triangles pointing down) and a final sashing strip – you should have used five sashing strips.

Sock pattern quilt borders

Sock pattern quilt borders

Sock pattern quilt borders

I’ve used three borders for this quilt.  The first border is made with 2.1/2″ black strips, the second with 1.1/2″ white strips and for the third border I returned to the 2.1/2″ black strips.  The lengths are given above in the cutting requirements.

That completes the sock pattern quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  You can find full details of these steps in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

An astonishing but heart warming thing happened last week.  A lady bought my window cat quilt and then asked me not to send it to her but instead to donate it to a child who would enjoy it.  Thank you, Gema – you are a kind and generous lady.

Craftsy

Pinwheel Squares Quilt Pattern


Pinwheel squares quilt pattern

Pinwheel squares quilt pattern

The pinwheel squares quilt pattern is another of those optical illusion quilts where the squares appear to lie behind the pinwheels.  It’s another Fabric Freedom pattern using their lovely Blossom fabric range.  I’ve made two versions of the pinwheel block – one dark and one light.  The quilt measures 43″ square and of course you could make it any size by just adding more blocks to either the width or the length.

I have used 3/4 yard of dark fabric (grey), 1/2 yard of light fabric (white floral).  I have used two medium fabrics:  3/4 yard of pink and 3/4 yard of green.  For the border I have used 1/2 yard of a different green from the same range of fabric.

The Blossom fabrics come in three different colour ranges, so I am offering this week’s special offer (all the fabrics for this quilt top at a 10% discount) in three variations:  pink, blue or red.  Click on this week’s special offer for details.

Cutting requirements for the pinwheel squares quilt pattern

4.7/8″ squares:  twenty six grey and twenty four white floral

2.7/8″ strips cut across the width of fabric:  seven strips each of pink and green

For the border you will need five 2″ strips of the second green cut across the width of fabric

Sew together strips of pink and green

Sew together strips of pink and green

How to make pinwheel squares quilt block 1

Cut the 4.7/8″ grey squares along one diagonal to make two triangles from each square.

Sew together strips of pink and green along the length.  Press and then cut these panels at 4.7/8″ intervals to make squares.

 

Cut the squares along one diagonal

Cut the squares along one diagonal

Place these squares so that the pink fabric is below the green fabric and cut along the diagonal that goes from bottom right to top left.  You will need the left hand triangle for quilt block 1 and the other triangle for quilt block 2.

Pinwheel squares quilt block 1 layout

Pinwheel squares quilt block 1 layout

 

Place four of the grey triangles with four pink/green triangles to make a pinwheel.  Note that the pink part of the triangle is placed outermost so that they appear to form a square frame behind the grey.  The green triangles form a small pinwheel in the middle – or a small green square behind the grey depending on how you look at it.

 

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block 1

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block 1

Sew the triangles together in pairs to make squares.  Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs to each other to create pinwheel  block 1.  Make thirteen of these.

 

Pinwheel squares quilt block 2 layout

Pinwheel squares quilt block 2 layout

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block2

Completed pinwheel squares quilt block 2

How to make pinwheel squares quilt block 2

The light pinwheel block is made in the same way but with the other triangles made from the green/pink squares and using white instead of grey triangles.

Note that the pink/green triangles are placed so that the green is outermost and the pink forms the small pinwheel in the middle.

Make twelve of the pinwheel squares blocks in these colours.

 

Alternate the blocks across the rows

Alternate the blocks across the rows

Assembling the pinwheel squares quilt

Sew the blocks together in five rows of five.  Rows one, three and five begin with the dark quilt block 1 and then alternate blocks 1 and 2 across the rows.  Row two and four begin with the light quilt block 2 and then alternate the blocks across the rows.

 

Pinwheel squares quilt border

Pinwheel squares quilt border

Pinwheel squares quilt border

For the border I have used 2″ strips of a different green fabric.  This will give a 1.1/2″ finished size border.

You will need two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 43.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the top of the pinwheel squares quilt pattern.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Last weekend I went to a really interesting workshop with Kimmy Brunner which gave me lots of lovely ideas for future quilts.  This weekend is going to be spent very quietly getting ready for my holiday – so many things that I had intended to make to take with me, but I just don’t think that I’ll have the time.

 

Butterfly Medallion Quilt


Butterfly medallion quilt

Butterfly medallion quilt

The butterfly medallion quilt is a great way to show off a range of fabrics.  In this case I have used the complete range of Butterfly Meadow from Fabric Freedom and this is their pattern for that range.  It measures 40″ by 46″ and I have used 3/4 yard each of the central floral fabric and the small print and white for the flying geese, with 1/2 yard each of the other three fabrics.  You can buy these fabrics at 10% discount in this week’s special offer.

Cutting requirements for the butterfly medallion quilt

Central panel:  18.1/2″ by 24.1/2″

First frame:  two strips 2.1/2″ by 24.1/2″, two strips 2.1/2″ by 22.1/2″

Second frame:  fifty eight floral rectangles 4.7/8″ by 2.7/8″, one hundred and sixteen 2.7/8″ white squares

Third frame:  four 3.1/2″ wide strips of butterfly fabric 36.1/2″ long

Final frame/border:  two 2.1/2″ gold strips 40.1/2″ long, two 2.1/2″ gold strips 42.1/2″ long

How to make flying geese units

How to make flying geese units

Making the flying geese units

Don’t be worried about making the flying geese – they are really very simple.  Place a floral rectangle right side up.  Place a white square on one side of the rectangle with right side down.  Sew a seam along the diagonal. Trim the excess fabric about 1/4″ above the seam and discard the two triangles.  Flip the remaining white triangle up so that it completes the rectangle and press.

Place another white square right side down on the other side of the rectangle.  It will overlap the first white triangle.  Sew a seam along the diagonal again.  Make sure that it’s the correct diagonal so that your two seams meet in the top middle of the rectangle.  Trim the excess triangles 1/4″ from the seam again and press the remaining white triangle up so that it completes the rectangle.

Make four cornerstones

Make four cornerstones

Make fifty eight of these.  Most of them will be sewn together in rows to make the second frame for the butterfly medallion quilt, but take four pairs of the flying geese and sew them together to make diamond in a square blocks.  These will be the cornerstones.  They will need trimming to make them 4.1/2″ squares.

Each individual flying geese unit should be trimmed to 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″.

Assembling the butterfly medallion quilt

Sew the first frame to the panel

Sew the first frame to the panel

This quilt is made by working out from the middle.  Place the floral panel down first and sew the two 24.1/2″ lengths of trellis fabric to the sides.  Then sew the 22.1/2″ lengths to the top and bottom.

Sew the flying geese units to the sides

Sew the flying geese units to the sides

Sew the flying geese units together in two lengths of fourteen units and two lengths of eleven units.

Sew a fourteen unit length to each side of the quilt.  Note that the triangles need to point upwards on the left hand side of the quilt but downwards on the right hand side of the quilt.

This will give you a complete frame of flying geese following each other clockwise around the quilt.

Make sure that the flying geese follow each other

Make sure that the flying geese follow each other

Sew one cornerstone to each end of both of the eleven unit lengths.  Sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.  On the top of the butterfly medallion quilt the triangles should be pointing from left to right while on the bottom of the quilt they will be pointing from right to left.

Third frame of the medallion quilt

Third frame of the medallion quilt

The next frame is completely straightforward.  Sew one length of the butterfly fabric to each side of the quilt and then sew one to the top and one to the bottom.  I had to check my measurements on this because I felt that all these strips should not be the same size, but in fact it works as long as you sew the sides first.

Border for the butterfly medallion quilt

Border for the butterfly medallion quilt

Quilt border

I’m not sure whether the final frame counts as a frame or a border, but sew a 42.1/2″ length of the gold fabric to the sides and a 40.1/2″ length to the top and bottom of the quilt.

You’ll have noticed that for this quilt I have always added the sides first and then the top and bottom.  This is unusual for me – usually I add the top and bottom first.  In fact, they are both perfectly acceptable methods – the important point is to be consistent.  Adding the sides first is known as ‘long horizontal’ while adding the top and bottom first is known as ‘long vertical’ – just in case you are interested!

The back of the butterfly medallion quilt

The back of the butterfly medallion quilt

That completes the butterfly medallion quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding. You can find full details of these steps towards the bottom of the quilting for beginners section.

You’ll be astonished to hear that Minnie and I have actually completed this medallion quilt.  The quilting shows up better on the back than on the front.  What I did was stitch in the ditch around each frame and then added a few lines of a flower design.

Here’s the video:


Craftsy

Quarter Square Triangle Quilt


Quarter square triangle quilt

Quarter square triangle quilt

The quarter square triangle quilt is a very simple but quite striking when fabrics with a strong contrast are used.  I’ve seen this design on vintage quilts before now and what struck me about it was the way the triangles are facing:  on the sides the dark triangles face outwards but on the top and bottom the dark triangles face inwards.  What this means is that if you rotate the block next to this, you’ll have two rows of triangles facing the same way – almost like a sashing between the blocks.  The quilt is made entirely from either half square or quarter square triangles and it measures 40″ square, making it a decent sized lap quilt.  I have used 1 yard each of both the black and the white.

Cutting requirements for the quarter square triangle quilt

2.7/8″ squares:  fifty six black, fifty six white

13.1/4″ squares:  two black, two white

2.1/2″ strips for the borders:  four strips each of black and white, cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Sew the triangles in rows

Sew the triangles in rows

Making one quarter of the quilt

Make half square triangles with the 2.7/8″ squares.  Place a black and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are 2.1/2″ squares.  Sew these half square triangle units together first in pairs so that they create one larger dark triangle with each pair of squares.  Then sew these larger triangles together in two rows of three triangles and two rows of four triangles.  Put these to one side for the moment.

Make quarter square triangles

Make quarter square triangles

One completed quarter square triangle unit

One completed quarter square triangle unit

Place a black and a white 13.1/4″ square with right sides together and make two half square triangle units as above.  Then take the two half square triangle units and place them right sides together.  Place them so that the white of one square is against the black of the other square.  Mark a line along the diagonal that crosses both white and black.  Sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line and when you cut along the line you will have two quarter square triangles which are both 12.1/2″ squares.  You need one of these for each quarter of the quilt.

 

Sew strips of triangles around the block

Sew strips of triangles around the block

Sew one strip of three small triangles to the top and one to the bottom of the quarter square triangle unit.  Sew one strip of four small triangles to each side.  Note that the black triangles at the top and bottom of the block are pointing outwards and the black triangles on the sides are pointing inwards.  This means that you are sewing the black edge of the strips to the big white triangles and the white edges of the strips to the big black triangles.

Sew the four quilt blocks together

Sew the four quilt blocks together

Completing the quarter square triangle quilt

Make four blocks the same and sew them together in pairs.  Notice that the quarter square triangles are rotated so that in each pair of quilt blocks the big black triangles are horizontal in one of the blocks and vertical in the other one.

Sew the two pairs of blocks together, checking the photo to see that you have the horizontal quarter square triangles diagonally opposite each other.

Two quilt borders

Two quilt borders

I’ve added two borders to this quilt, both made from 2.1/2″ strips.  The first border is made from black strips.  You will need two lengths of 32.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the sides.  The second border is made from white strips.  You will need two lengths of 36.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 40.1/2″ for the sides.

The quarter square triangle quilt top is now complete and ready for layering, quilting and binding.  You can find full details of these steps in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

 

 

Square and Half Quilt


 

Square and a half quilt

Square and a half quilt

The square and a half quilt (I know it’s not a very imaginative name!) is made using one quilt block only but it has the look of a quilt carefully designed with two very different blocks.  I just love it when that happens.  I’ve used nine square and a half quilt blocks to make this 55″ square quilt, using 3/4 yard of green, 1 yard each of dark blue and white, with 1.1/4 yards of light blue.  Once again I am offering these fabrics as a kit with 10% off the fabric price for the next few days.  Click here for details.

Cutting requirements for the square and a half quilt

3.7/8″ squares:  fifty four each in dark blue and white

3.1/2″ squares:  nine green, thirty six white, thirty six light blue

4.1/4″ squares:  eighteen green, nine light blue, nine dark blue

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a white square and a dark blue square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangles which are 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowance towards the dark fabric and trim the corners of the square.  Put these to one side now so that they don’t get confused with the quarter square triangles made in the next step.

Make quarter square triangles

Make quarter square triangles

Completed quarter square triangle units

Completed quarter square triangle units

Making the quarter square triangle units

Use the 4.1/4″ squares to make half square triangles as above, using one green square with either a light blue or a dark blue square.

Place one green/light blue half square triangle right sides together with a green/dark blue half square triangle.  Make sure that the green on one square is placed against the blue in the other square.  Mark a line along the other diagonal – so that it crosses the seam.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This produces two quarter square triangles which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Each one has two green quarters opposite each other and a light blue and a dark blue quarter opposite each other.

Inner part of the square and a half quilt block

Inner part of the square and a half quilt block

Making the square and a half quilt block

I think it will be easier to see the layout of the block if I show you the middle first.  This is nine patches with a green square in the middle, a light blue square in each corner and a quarter square triangle unit against each edge of the central square.  Note that these are placed so that the dark blue triangle is always along the edge of the green square.

Square and a half quilt block layout

Square and a half quilt block layout

Now it’s a simple matter to add the outer layer of the quilt block.  There’s a white square in the middle of each edge and dark blue/white half square triangles everywhere else.  These are placed so that the dark blue triangles seem to cut across the corner of the block.  In each corner there are three half square triangles and these are placed so that the triangles are facing the same way as each other in each corner.

Sew the squares together across each of the five rows and then sew the rows to each other.  You will need nine of these quilt blocks.

Assembling the square and a half quilt

This is a terribly easy quilt layout – just sew the quilt blocks together in three rows of three.

First two quilt borders

First two quilt borders

Quilt border

I have used three borders to frame this quilt.  The first border is made using 2.1/2″ strips of light blue fabric.  You will need two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the sides.

For the second border I have used 1.1/2″ strips of the green fabric.  Make two lengths of 49.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the sides.

Third quilt border

Third quilt border

Finally, for the third border I have returned to the 2.1/2″ strips of light blue fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 51.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 55.1/2″ for the sides.

The square and a half quilt top is now complete and ready for layering, quilting and binding.  More details on these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

 

Here’s the video:

Thanks so much for all your wonderful suggestions for a name for my longarm machine.  It was a real treat to read them and I really appreciate so many of you taking the time to write in with ideas.  It was extremely difficul to choose, but I have decided to go with Minnie as my name for her.  It works on several levels – trips off the tongue whether I am pleased or annoyed with her, she is definitely not ‘mini’, and it’s a shortening of minion.  I’m still working on the last bit – she is most definitely the boss at the moment.  I have been trying to work with her a little each day and I definitely feel better about her now than I did a week ago.  My movements still seem a little jerky – but I can hardly blame that on her!
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Barn Dance Quilt


 

Barn dance quilt

Barn dance quilt

I was going to call this quilt pattern Square Dance but then I realised that I already have a quilt called that, so it is now officially the barn dance quilt – even though the quilt blocks are floral!  I just felt that the blocks reminded me of people whirling around in a dance.  The quilt measures 54″ square and I have used 1.1/2 yards of cream fabric, 3/4 yard each of yellow and pink fabric and 1/2 yard each of blue and green fabric.  Given the colours that I have used, I think I can see this as a beach or picnic quilt.

Once again I have made up a few kits of the butterfly fabrics used in this quilt top and I am offering them at 10% discount just for the next few days.  Click here for details.

Quilt block one

Quilt block one

Cutting requirements for quilt block one

2.7/8″ squares:  thirty two each in yellow and cream

4.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in cream and pink

2.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty two cream

Quilt block two

Quilt block two

Cutting requirements for quilt block two

4.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in yellow and cream, eight each in pink and green

4.1/2″ squares:  eight cream, eight pink

2.1/2″ squares:  sixteen green

2.7/8″ squares:  eight each in green and cream

You will also need five 3.1/2″ strips of blue fabric for the border

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

For both blocks, make half square triangles with all the 2.7/8″ and 4.7/8″ squares.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangles.  Press the seam allowances towards the dark fabric and trim the corners where the triangle tips stick out.

Layout for quilt block one

Layout for quilt block one

Sew the squares in pairs

Sew the squares in pairs

Make quilt block one

This is the one that made me think of four people whirling around in a dance.

Lay the patchwork squares out as shown in the photo.  This is classified as a five patch block but the differing sizes of the patches mean that it is not quite as straightforward as five rows of five.  Sew the yellow half square triangles together in pairs – two of them with the squares side by side and two of them with the square beneath them.  Sew the two large pink half square triangles in pairs.

Complete the two halves of the quilt block

Complete the two halves of the quilt block

Now you can sew the squares together across the rows.  The simplest way is to make up the two halves of the quilt block and then sew the two halves together, so you need to sew rows one and two to each other first and then add the rectangle.

You will need eight of these blocks.

Quilt block two layout

Quilt block two layout

Make quilt block two

Lay the patchwork squares out in three rows of three.  The pieces in this quilt block are almost all the same size so this one is more straightforward to sew together.

I forgot to take a photo of the green four patch unit in the bottom right corner of the block, but it is made with two 2.1/2″ green squares and two green/cream half square triangles.  You need to sew these together first and then the rest of the block can be made by simply sewing the squares together across each row and then sewing the rows to each other.  You will also need eight of these blocks.

Rows one and two of the quilt

Rows one and two of the quilt

Assembling the barn dance quilt

The main feature of this quilt is the green diamond formed in the middle of the quilt, so that’s the easiest way to describe the layout of the blocks.  The blocks are laid out in four rows of four.  Row one is made with quilt block one at each end and two of quilt block two in the middle.  Rotate the central blocks so that the two green triangles form a larger green triangle as shown.

Row two has two of quilt block one in the middle with a quilt block two at each end.  Place the end blocks so that the green triangles continue the diamond shape, extending the green to the edges of the quilt.

Final two rows of the quilt

Final two rows of the quilt

Row three has two of quilt block one in the middle again and one quilt block two at each end.  These are rotated so that the green triangles point down from each edge towards the middle.

Row four is the same as row one but with the green triangles coming to a point at the bottom of the quilt.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Barn dance quilt border

Barn dance quilt border

Barn dance quilt border

Obviously I couldn’t stop myself adding some blue to this quilt pattern, so I have used 3.1/2″ blue strips for the border.  You will need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the barn dance quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found towards the bottom of the beginner quilting page.

Here’s the video:

Long arm quilting machine

Long arm quilting machine

Those of you who follow my blog will know that I bought a longarm quilting machine recently.  It arrived in lots of boxes and I foolishly believed the instructions that said it would take two to four hours to put it all together.  Eventually, I had to call in a friend to help me put it all together and then I felt slightly intimidated by this huge thing dominating the room. It was suggested to me (thank you, Carole) that the machine and I would become better acquainted if I named it – so it’s over to you:  can you help me by suggesting a name for my longarm.  I would love to see your suggestions – just leave your ideas in the comments section below and I’ll let you know next week which one I have chosen.
Fitbit Aria

Royal quilt pattern


 

Royal quilt pattern

Royal quilt pattern

I know that I have used an uninteresting name for this quilt pattern, but inspiration deserted me.  Do please let me know if you can think of a more exiciting name for it.  If you look closely you’ll see that it’s made from a few very simple blocks.  The colours are very different from my normal choices, but purple and gold do give a wonderfully rich look to a quilt.  When I began to design this quilt, I decided that I wanted a pinwheel in the middle with some sort of barn raising type design around it.  I laid out the squares and then went away and thought about it.  Gradually throughout yesterday I tinkered with the placement of the quilt blocks until I ended up with a completely different design – but one that I like a lot!

The quilt measures 58″ square and I have used 1.3/4 yards of the purple and 2 yards of the gold.  I’ve used a lot of strip piecing to speed things up.

Cutting requirements

6.7/8″ squares:  twelve each in purple and gold

6.1/2″ squares:  eight each in purple and gold

2.1/2″ strips:  twelve strips of both fabrics cut across the width of fabric, plus an additional six strips of gold for the border.

Making the half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles with the 6.7/8″ squares.  Place one purple and one gold square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangles.  You will need twenty four half square triangle units (made from twelve purple and twelve gold squares).

Making the nine patch units

Sew three strips together

Sew three strips together

These units are much quicker to make if you use some strip piecing.  Sew together 2.1/2″ strips in one panel of purple, gold, purple  and another panel of gold, purple, gold.  Press the seam allowances all the same way on each panel – it will make it more easy to nest them when you sew strips together.

Cut at 2.1/2″ intervals so that you have strips 2.1/2″ wide by 6.1/2″ long.

Make nine patch quilt blocks

Make nine patch quilt blocks

Each nine patch unit can be made with one strip of gold/purple/gold and two strips of purple/gold/purple.  Sew the three strips to each other to complete one nine patch quilt block.  You will need twenty eight nine patch blocks so cut fifty six of the purple/gold/purple strips and twenty eight of the gold/purple/gold strips.

Make stripey quilt blocks

Make stripey quilt blocks

Using the light/dark/light panels only, cut at 6.1/2″ intervals to make 6.1/2″ square stripey quilt blocks.  You will need twelve of these.

Along with the plain 6.1/2″ squares in both purple and gold, you now have all the blocks made ready to begin making the quilt.

 

Assembling the royal quilt top

This quilt design is symmetrical in all directions which makes it more easy to put together:  once you have laid out all the quilt blocks, you can keep checking one side against the other to make sure that you have everything in the right place and facing in the right direction.

First three rows of the royal quilt

First three rows of the royal quilt

The first row has a purple square at each end and in the middle.  On each side of the middle square there are a half square triangle, a stripey block and a nine patch unit.

The second row has a half square triangle at each end and a nine patch block in the middle.  On either side of the central square are a plain gold square, a nine patch unit and a half square triangle.

The third row has a stripey square at each end with the stripe placed vertically and a plain gold square in the middle.  On either side of the central square are two nine patch units and a half square triangle.

Rows four to six of the quilt

Rows four to six of the quilt

The fourth row is made with a nine patch at each end and a vertical stripe in the middle.  One either side are a nine patch unit and two half square triangles.  The two half square triangles are placed to form a diamond shape.

Row five is the central row of the quilt.  It has a purple square at each end and a nine patch in the middle.  On either side there are a nine patch, a plain gold square and a stripey block with the stripe horizontal.

Row six is where the quilt pattern begins to repeat itself, so it is made with the same blocks as row four, but with the triangles placed differently.

Final three rows of the quilt

Final three rows of the quilt

Row seven uses the same blocks as row three.  Row eight uses the same blocks as those used in row two and the ninth row has the same blocks as the first row.  In each case the triangles are angled so that the design draws in towards the middle.

Sew all the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Royal quilt border

Royal quilt border

For the border I have just used a simple gold 2.1/2″ strip.  You will need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the sides.  The royal quilt is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

 

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