Nordic Stocking Advent Calendar

Nordic stocking advent calendar and bunting

Nordic stocking advent calendar and bunting

The Nordic stocking advent calendar is a collection of 24 delightful stockings with a modern design on them.  You could just applique them to a background fabric, but I have chosen to make a traditional advent calendar with the red stockings and a string of bunting with the grey stockings.  You can buy all these fabrics here.

Cutting requirements

One panel of stockings for each project together with about 1 yard of fabric for backing the stockings

To make the bunting you will need  two 2″ strips of fabric cut across the width for the tape.

For the advent calendar you will need a 29.1/2″ square each of wadding and backing fabric, together with a 27″ square of background fabric and 1.1/2″ strips of red fabric for the border:  two at 27″ and two at 29″.  The hanging sleeve is made with a rectangle 3.1/2″ by 26″ of fabric.




Preparing the stockings

Cut the individual stockings out

Cut the individual stockings out

First you need to cut carefully round each stocking shape.  There is a grey seam allowance included on each stocking.  Cut carefully around this.  Place a stocking on the backing fabric and cut twenty four background stocking shapes which are longer at the top than the original stocking.

Clip the seam allowance at the curves

Clip the seam allowance at the curves

Turn the seam allowance at the top of the stocking towards the wrong side and sew in place.  With right sides together, sew each stocking to one of backing fabric, following the stitching line on the stockings.

Trim the seam allowances and clip all the curves through the seam allowance, taking care not to cut the seam itself.

Turn the stockings right side out, gently pushing out the curves and press.

Making the Christmas bunting

Fold the fabric to make tape

Fold the fabric to make tape

Cut a 2″ strip of the fabric to be used for the tape.  I should probably have used a length of fabric cut on the bias, but I have to confess that I just used a straight strip here.

Press the strip in half along its length, giving you a 1″ double strip.  Then fold each raw edge in towards the fold so that you have a 1/2″ strip, four layers of fabric, and all the raw edges tucked away.

Slip the stocking into the tape

Slip the stocking into the tape

Trim the background fabric above the stocking to 1/4″ and slip this background fabric between the layers of the tape.  You want the front of the stocking to be just below the tape so that the stocking can be opened.  Sew the tape across the top of the stocking, then slip the next one between the folds and sew that in place.  I have just put six stockings each to four lengths of tape rather than making one long length of bunting, but you might prefer to make one length with all 24 stockings on it.

Make the background panel

Make the background panel

Preparing the Nordic stocking advent calendar

For the background of this calendar I cut a 27″ square of blue Christmas fabric and sewed a 1.1/2″ strip of red fabric to the edges to frame it.

Layer the advent calendar

Layer the advent calendar

Then I layered it:  a 29.1/2″ square of wadding followed by the same sized square of backing fabric with right side up and then the background panel with right side down.  Sew all round the edges of three and a half sides, leaving a gap to enable you to turn the whole thing right side out.  Trim the seam allowance, clip the corners and turn the calendar right side out.  Slipstitch across the gap.

Assembling the Nordic stocking advent calendar

Arrange the stockings

Arrange the stockings

Prepare the stockings as above.  Trim the backing above the stockings to about 1/2″ and turn this down inside the stocking so that the front and the back of the stockings are at the same level.

Pin them in place on the background fabric.  I would recommend pinning them all in place so that you can check the placement and not run out of space at the end.  I have chosen to use straight rows and to place the stockings in numerical order, but obviously you might prefer a random placement.

Star embroidery looks better on the back

Star embroidery looks better on the back

In order to sew the stockings in place, I was going to use a straight stitch but then decided to use a star embroidery stitch as I thought that this would look better on the back of the calendar – it fits in better with the backing fabric.  It’s a bit fiddly just sewing the backing fabric of the stockings in order to allow the stockings to be opened and filled, but I felt that the result was well worth the effort.

Add a hanging sleeve

Add a hanging sleeve

The reason that I left sewing the stockings on till the last step (rather than sewing them to the panel before I sewed the layers together) was so that the embroidery stitches could form the quilting, holding the three layers together.

Finally I sewed a hanging sleeve on the back of the Nordic stocking advent calendar.  You can get more ideas for hanging wall hangings here.

I hope that this has given you some ideas for your Christmas sewing.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Christmas Bunting Templates


How to make Christmas bunting flags

How to make Christmas bunting flags

As Christmas approaches I thought that it would be a good idea to share my thoughts on how to make Christmas bunting flags:  my method is very simple and there’s a link to the bunting templates below.  I have made six bunting flags here but of course you could make as many as you needed depending on the length that you need and either repeat the designs or make up some of your own.

Cutting requirements

Light background fabric:  9″ strips cut across the width of fabric

Scraps of both Christmas fabric and interfacing

Length of ribbon or cord to hang the bunting

Click for Christmas bunting templates

Making the Christmas bunting flags

Mark 60 degree lines

Mark 60 degree lines

Mark and cut the bunting flags

Mark and cut the bunting flags

Cut a 9″ strip of fabric across the width of fabric.  Place your ruler so that the 60 degree line runs across the bottom edge of the fabric and mark a line on the fabric.  Turn the ruler to use the other 60 degree line to mark the lines in the other direction.  Cut along the lines to create the triangles which will form the bunting flags.

 

 

 

Two methods to stop fraying

Two methods to stop fraying

Turn under a 1/2" seam on the top

Turn under a 1/2″ seam on the top

In order to prevent fraying I tried two different methods.  On the left hand triangle I turned under a small hem and sewed it down with straight stitch.  On the right hand one I just zig zagged all the way around.  On balance I think I prefer the left hand option with a hemmed edge, but the other one does give a slightly wavy edge which you may prefer.

Along the top edge, turn under a 1/2″ seam.  Sew this as close to the bottom of the seam as possible to create a tube.  You will need this to thread the ribbon for handing the Christmas bunting flags.

Cut the bunting templates

Cut the bunting templates

Place the shapes on the bunting flags

Place the shapes on the bunting flags

Cut the bunting templates out in paper.  Make up a series of scraps of Christmas fabric with interfacing – I was able to use scraps of interfacing here.  Cut the template shapes in fabric and place one on each bunting triangle.

 

 

 

 

 

Zigzag round each shape

Zigzag round each shape

Sew around the edge of each bunting template shape using a zigzag stitch.  I set my sewing machine to stitch width 3 and stitch length 1.  In the example shown, when you reach the tip of a star, finish with your needle down on the right hand side before you swivel the fabric.  When you reach the base of each spike of the star, finish with your needle down on the left hand side before you swivel the fabric.  This should give you a neat corner in each case.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thread the ribbon on a safety pin

Thread the ribbon on a safety pin

Push the safety pin through the bunting flag

Push the safety pin through the bunting flag

When you have completed the Christmas bunting flags, it just remains to string them up.  Thread the end of the ribbon on to a safety pin.  This will give you a solid end to push through the tube at the top of each flag.  Keep going until you have all the flags threaded, hang up and enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

Hope to see you again soon.

Rose

 

 

 

 

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