STORM AT SEA QUILT BLOCK





Storm at sea quilt block

Storm at sea quilt block

Storm at sea is a beautiful quilt block that gives lovely rolling designs when several of them are sewn together.  In keeping with my practice of trying to keep things as simple as possible, I have made it here using only squares, rectangles and triangles to avoid buying expensive templates.  However I have to admit that my original intention was to make a full quilt and then I opted to make just four blocks for a quilted wall hanging – it’s not a quick block to make.  Each storm at sea quilt block is 15.1/2″ square and I have used four to make a wall hanging 31″ square.

Fabric requirements for the storm at sea quilt

I have used (very approximately) a 4.1/2″ strip of grey, 1 yard of white, 3/4 yard each of light blue and black, 3/4 yard of dark blue.

The first section of the storm at sea quilt block

First section of the storm at sea quilt block

First section of the storm at sea quilt block

Sew a white triangle to each edge of the grey square

Sew a white triangle to each edge of the grey square

There are three basic sections to the storm at sea quilt block.  I have made four blocks the same.  The first section is the square in square shown.  Cut a 4.1/2″ grey square and two 4″ white squares.  Cut the white squares along one diagonal and sew one white triangle to each edge of the grey square.

 

 

 

The completed white/grey square

The completed white/grey square

Sew triangles to each edge

Sew triangles to each edge

Cut 5.1/2″ squares:  two light blue, one dark blue and one black.  Cut these along one diagonal and sew the triangles to the edges of the white square.  Place the dark blue and black triangles opposite each other and the two light blue triangles opposite each other.  Trim the finished block to 9″ square.  You will need one of these for each storm at sea quilt block, four for the wall hanging.

 

 

The second section of the storm at sea quilt block

The diamonds of the storm at sea quilt block

The diamonds of the storm at sea quilt block

Cut the rectangles along one diagonal

Cut the rectangles along one diagonal

The second section of the storm at sea quilt block is made using rectangles cut along the diagonal.  This is to make the diamonds that surround the central square.  Cut 5.1/2″ by 2.7/8″  rectangles:  eight white, four black and four dark blue.  Cut these along one diagonal.  Make sure that you cut the original rectangles in pairs as they come off the fabric:  one with right side up and one with right side down.  Otherwise your triangles won’t match up – you’ll end up with some that can’t be matched.

 

 

Sew the triangles together

Sew the triangles together

Trim the corners of the rectangles

Trim the corners of the rectangles

Sew the white triangles to either a black or a dark blue triangle.  You will need four of these pairs of rectangles for each diamond.  Note that when you sew the triangles together you need to have the tip of each triangle sticking out about 1/4″ at each end.  Otherwise you will lose too much length along the rectangle.  Press the rectangles and trim the corners.  Make two diamonds in black and white and two in dark blue and white for each storm at sea quilt block.  Trim them to 9″ long.

 

The third section of the storm at sea quilt block

The corners of the storm at sea quilt block

The corners of the storm at sea quilt block

Make three different corner units

Make three different corner units

The third section of the storm at sea quilt block is another square in square block, but with only one layer.  Cut four white 3.1/4″ squares for the centre and two 3″ black squares.  Cut the black squares along one diagonal to make triangles and sew one triangle to each edge of the white square.  For each block you will need one white square with four black triangles, one white square with one black and three dark blue triangles, and two white squares with one black, one dark blue and two light blue triangles.

 

Trim a little from each side of the square

Trim a little from each side of the square

 

Trim the square to 4″.  Take care to trim a little from each side rather than all from one edge.

 

 

Assembling the storm at sea quilt block

Storm at sea quilt block layout

Storm at sea quilt block layout

The four storm at sea quilt blocks are the same but rotated when they are sewn together to get that circular feel from the black diamonds.  The central square has the black triangle facing towards the corner that has the white square with all black triangles.  The two black diamonds are either side of that corner, with the two blue diamonds on the other two edges of the square.  The two corner squares with one black, one dark blue and two light blue triangles are in the top right and bottom left corners, both with the black facing towards the middle.  The remaining corner square is in the bottom right with the black triangle facing away from the central square.

 

Sew the rows together

Sew the rows together

Completed storm at sea quilt block

Completed storm at sea quilt block

Sew the pieces together across the rows and then sew the rows of the storm at sea quilt block together.  Sorry – I seem to have taken photos showing a different rotation each time, but trust me – they are all the same block!

 

 

Sew the quilt blocks together in two pairs, taking care to rotate them so that the black part of the quilt block makes a frame and then sew the pairs together to complete the storm at sea quilt top.  I shall probably make this into a wall hanging rather than a quilt, but you can find further details on layering, quilting and binding here.

Here’s the video:

 

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Comments

  1. Thank you for a wonderful clear and precise set of instructions , I was not able to play the video, the play button did not appear…was it me, or is the video down?

  2. Debra Friendly (Canada) says:

    Rose – I really like this block and have added it to my list of favourites. I look forward to trying it. I think I had heard of it but it doesn’t seem to be highlighted much in magazines, etc.

    • Hi Debra. I agree it’s a lovely quilt pattern. It’s more easy to describe on a video, so maybe that’s why it doesn’t appear so much in magazines. rose

  3. Dear Rose, I always thought this block was difficult to make but you have just changed my mind. I think it is wonderful and will have to have a go myself now. All I need are a few more hours in each day – it’s gardening time now!! Thank you for your wonderful hints, tips and explanations. It’s amazing how easy you make it for beginners like me.

    • Thanks, Anita. I’m glad you like it. Lots of quilts become simple when you break them down into small steps. I could also use many more hours in the day. It would be nice to reduce my UFO pile and tidy my garden! rose

  4. Rose, love your instructions and love this quilt.
    Thank you for taken us newbies under your wing and teaching us.

  5. Rose they are both beautiful patterns another 2to my list
    Thanks Rose. Rhoda

  6. This is probably the most exquisite of your designs – never know what you’re going to come up with next, but can’t wait. You’re super good!

  7. Marta Alfaro says:

    Muchas gracias Rosa, sus trabajos son siempre hermosos y sus explicaciones muy claras. Mucha gracias por compartir sus conocimiento, siempre me motivan a trabajas más. Muchas bendiciones y un gran abrazo desde Costa Rica, además quiero decirle que si algún día decide venir mi casa va ha ser tu casa.

    • Here’s the google translation of Marta’s lovely comments:
      Thank you very much Rosa, your works are always beautiful and clear explanations. Many thanks for sharing your knowledge, always motivate me to work harder. Many blessings and a big hug from Costa Rica, and I would say that if you ever decide to come my house is going to be your home.

      Thank you, Marta. Your comments are very kind. If I come to Costa Rica I would love to meet up with you. Rose

  8. Thank you, Rose for such a wonderfully clear explanation of this difficult block. You just made my day showing how easy it can be if you just break up the block into simple steps. Plus I am so happy to learn I don’t need a template for it. That is what always put me off from attempting it. Kudos, you are an excellent teacher. Your site goes on my ‘ go to’ list for piecing and quilting.
    Btw, How did you ‘quilt’ this?

    • Thanks, Ayse. It definitely isn’t a simple block – I think you end up with more seams to make it in this way, but as you say it does mean that you can get away with not having to buy a template. I haven’t quilted it yet, but would probably try to follow the circular shape to emphasise the design. I’ll put a photo up when I do eventually finish it.

  9. Não falo inglês, mas consegui entender as explicações muito detalhadas no vídeo. Parabéns!

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