WILLIAM MORRIS QUILT PATTERN


William Morris quilt

William Morris quilt

William Morris was a 19th century textile design, artist and writer and had a huge influence on the English Arts and Crafts Movement.  Fabric Freedom carry a range of fabrics known as William Morris and I have based this quilt pattern on one of their suggested projects (with their permission, I hasten to add!).  The basic quilt blocks are made from half square triangles and stars and the design comes from the placement and colour.  I have used five fabrics from Fabric Freedom’s William Morris range.

 Cutting requirements

red fabric:  two strips 8.7/8″ across the width of fabric for half square triangles, five strips 2.7/8″ for flying geese units, seven strips 1.1/2″ for first border, two strips 2.1/2″ for second border

brown fabric:  two strips 8.7/8″ for half square triangles, five strips 2.7/8″ for flying geese, two strips 2.1/2″ for second border

white fabric:  two strips 8.7/8″ for half square triangles, two strips 5.1/4″ for flying geese, two strips 2.1/2″ for second border, four strips 2.1/2″ for star corners

light brown fabric:  two strips 8.7/8″ for half square triangles, two strips 5.1/4″ for flying geese, four strips 2.1/2″ for star corners

square in star:  two strips 4.1/2″

binding:  seven strips 2.1/2″

the finished quilt size is 70″ square

Making the William Morris quilt blocks

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

 

I’ll begin with the half square triangle because it’s the simplest.  Take two 8.7/8″ squares and lay them with right sides together.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line.  cut along the marked line and you will have two squares each made of a half square triangle of each colour.  You will need sixteen of these in brown/cream and sixteen in red/white.

 

Mark the diagonals on the small squares

Mark the diagonals on the small squares

Place two small squares on a large square

Place two small squares on a large square

The star is made from a central square with a flying geese unit on each edge.  I’ll put the link for the flying geese video at the bottom of the page, but just to run through it now:  mark a line along the diagonal of the 2.7/8″ squares in the dark colours (brown and red).  With right sides together, put two of these squares on a 5.1/4″ square of the light fabric with the diagonal lines on the small squares running along the diagonal of the large square.  Trim one corner of each of the small squares so that they don’t overlap and sew seams 1/4″ either side of the marked line.

Fold up and pin the small squares

Fold up and pin the small squares

Add two more squares

Add two more squares

Fold up the two squares that you have just sewn to keep them out of the way and two more squares in the empty corners of the large square.  Trim the corners in the middle again and sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line.  The large square now has two seams along each diagonal.  Cut along the two diagonals between the seam lines and you will have four flying geese units.  Trust me, it will be clear you’ve seen the video.

 

Sew the flying geese units to the square

Sew the flying geese units to the square

Complete William Morris star quilt block

Complete William Morris star quilt block

Sew one flying geese unit to the top and to the bottom of the central square.  Sew a 2.1/2″ square in the light fabric to either end of two more flying geese units and sew these to the sides of the square.  that completes the William Morris star quilt block.  You will need sixteen of these in brown/cream and sixteen in red/white.

 

Sewing the William Morris quilt blocks together

Stars and half square triangles

Stars and half square triangles

Half with the star on the right

Half with the star on the right

So now it’s just a case of sewing them all together.  Sew each star to a half square triangle, keeping the reds and browns separate.  Then rotate half of these pairs of blocks and sew them together so each star is on the right in the top row and on the left in the second row.

 

 

Red blocks and brown blocks

Red blocks and brown blocks

These four patches sewn together are the basic William Morris quilt blocks.  Sew them together in pairs with a red next to a brown, then sew the pairs together in fours making sure that you continue alternating the red and brown squares.  This will give you four rows of four quilt blocks.  Sew the rows together making sure that if one row starts with a red block then the one underneath starts with a brown block.

 

William Morris quilt borders

I’ve followed the Fabric Freedom pattern in using two borders.  The first one is made using 1.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  Sew a 64.1/2″ strip to the top and bottom of the quilt and then sew 66.1/2″ strips to the two sides.

Coloured strips with white squares

Coloured strips with white squares

Second border of the William Morris quilt

Second border of the William Morris quilt

For the second border cut 2.1/2″ squares in white and 9.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips in red and brown.  Make up four strips using a coloured strip alternating with a white square.  For two of them use six coloured strips and five white squares so that there is a coloured strip at each end.  Sew these to the top and bottom of the quilt.  for the other two use six coloured strips and seven white squares so that there is a white square at each end.  Sew these to the sides of the William Morris quilt top which is now complete.  For full details of layering, quilting and binding, go to the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

 

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