SQUARE IN A SQUARE QUILT PATTERN


Square in square quilt

Square in square quilt

 

Usually for my projects I try to show you patterns that you can make using the basics without having to buy any extras, but occasionally I find a quilting accessory that makes such a difference that it is well worth telling you about.

Triangle template

Triangle template

 

This square in a square quilt was made using a Creative Grids template ruler called Quarter Square Triangle and the quilt was made in a fraction of the time that it would have taken me without the ruler.  The final quilt size is 50″ square and I have used 60″ of each of the two fabrics – that’s about 1.3/4 yards of each one.  You will then need more fabric for the binding, backing and wadding.

 

Making the square in square quilt blocks

Sew the strips in pairs

Sew the strips in pairs

 

I began by cutting twenty 2.1/2″ strips across the width of the fabric in each of two different fabrics.  It makes quite a dramatic quilt if you use two fabrics which contrast sharply, but of course it could also be used to make a jelly roll quilt.  Sew the strips together in pairs as shown on the left.  Press the strips with the seam allowance towards the dark fabric.

 

Sew two pairs of strips together

Sew two pairs of strips together

 

Take two pairs of strips and place them with right sides together and the light fabric facing the dark fabric.  Sew the pairs of strips together along the length to create a tube.  Repeat with the rest of the strips until you have ten tubes.

 

 

Cut the triangles of fabric

Cut the triangles of fabric

Take a tube of strips and fold it in half so that the two short edges are together.  Place the quarter square triangle ruler along the folded strip.  Line up the black broken line at the bottom of the triangle with the stitch line on your fabric and line up the right hand edge of the ruler just inside the selvedges of the fabric strips – if you haven’t already trimmed them.  Taking care to keep your fingers from the edges cut along the triangles of the ruler.

 

Unfold the fabric to cut one more triangle

Unfold the fabric to cut one more triangle

 

I find that I can cut three triangles as shown above.  Then I unfold the rest of the tube of the fabric and cut one more triangle as shown on the right.  As the tube is folded, that means that I get seven triangles from each tube of fabric.

 

 

Unpick the few stitches at the top

Unpick the few stitches at the top

Sew the squares together in pairs

Sew the squares together in pairs

 

At the top of each triangle there are a few stitches from the top line of stitching.  Unpick these and your triangle will unfold to make a 6″ square.  Sew all these squares together in pairs as shown on the right.

 

Sew the square in square quilt blocks together

Sew the squares together in fours

Sew the squares together in fours

Sew the square in square blocks together

Sew the square in square blocks together

Sew the pairs together to make a square.  With most quilts I would then recommend sewing together squares across each row and then sewing the rows together.  However for this quilt I found it best to sew together four blocks of four squares and then sew th blocks together.  That way you have shorter seams to deal with until the very last seam.

Square in square quilt border

The square in square quilt that I made used sixteen blocks which meant that I had six of the triangles left over as well as the offcuts – more leftover fabric than I would normally like – so I am still thinking about how to use this.

Add the first quilt border

Add the first quilt border

Square in square quilt complete

Square in square quilt complete

At this stage the square in square quilt measures 44″ square.  For the quilt border I added a 2″ strip of the dark fabric across the top and bottom (44″ strips) and then down each side (47″ strips), followed by a 2″ strip of light fabric across the top and bottom (47″ strips) and then down each side (50″).  That way I could use the dark fabric for the quilt binding.

I have kept the border simple so the entire quilt is extremely quick to make but a non quilter will think you laboured for months on this square in square quilt!

Here’s the video:

 

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Comments

  1. Jenny McIntyre says:

    This looks absolutely gorgeous and you make it look so easy. I might just try this – using just the two colours makes it look very dramatic. Thank you so much for showing me how to do it.

    • Thanks, Jenny. I agree – it’s quite a striking quilt, isn’t it. One of the oldest and most traditional quilt blocks as well. It’s surprising how many different ways there are to make the same block!

  2. Tina Tyler says:

    I love this pattern! It looks really easy. The only question I have: It says to cut twenty 2.1/2″ strips. Is that the width? If so, how long do we make them? I am confused 🙁

    • Hi Tina. Sorry if it’s not clear. Yes, 2.1/2″ is the width of the strips. They are cut across the width of the fabric from selvage to selvage, so they are about 42″ long. I hope that helps.

  3. Yes it does help. Thank you so much

  4. Louise Bennett says:

    I fancy having a go at this, as I am close to completing my very first quilt – a railfence. I am struggling to work out what quantity of light and dark fabric I would need for this quilt, can you help please Rose? Thanks

    • Hi Louise. Sorry – one of my earlier quilt patterns and I didn’t always include the fabric requirements then. You’ll need 1.3/4 yards each of the light fabric and the dark fabric. That will give you the quilt top only. For the binding you’ll need a further 1/2 yard of fabric and for the backing and wadding you’ll need squares of approximately 54″.

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