SILK NECKTIE QUILT PATTERN

Silk necktie quilt pattern

Silk necktie quilt pattern

A while ago I was asked for a silk necktie quilt pattern.  I decided to include three different necktie quilt blocks to give you plenty of ideas if you were planning one of your own.  The silk neckties in my quilt came from charity shops but you may have neckties in your household crying out to be made into a quilt – they certainly make vibrant quilts.  My necktie quilt is 32″ square so I think that probably makes it more suitable for a necktie quilted wall hanging.

Taking the neckties apart

Unpick the back seam

Unpick the back seam

Remove the lining

Remove the lining

I trawled the Ludlow charity shops and found seven lovely silk neckties.   I could have used some of the polyester or wool neckties but I felt that it was best to stick to one type of fabric within the necktie quilt.  They all have a seam up the back which can be unpicked fairly easily.

 

There is a layer of lining/strengthening which can be removed fairly easily, leaving the silk panel with a lined triangle at each end.  I had hoped to use these ends – maybe in the quilt border – but in the end I didn’t because it would have made the necktie quilt larger than I wanted it to be.

The four patch necktie quilt blocks

Two background squares with two necktie squares

Two background squares with two necktie squares

Make a four patch unit

Make a four patch unit

The amount of useable silk from each necktie obviously varies but I began by cutting two 4.1/2″ squares from six of the ties and made a four patch quilt block using these with two 4.1/2″ squares cut fromthe background fabric of gold coloured silk.  These photos show the first tie that I used and for this I didn’t use fusible interfacing.  That was a big mistake as the silk is very fine (for which read stretchy!) so I backed all the remaining neckties before I cut the patches.

The dresden plate necktie quilt block

Cut the dresden plate segments

Cut the dresden plate segments

The next quilt block that I made for the necktie quilt was the dresden plate patchwork for the centre.  Dresden plate templates vary in size but mine is for a twenty segment circle.  I decided on a 5″ unfinished length of segment so I cut a 5″ length of fabric and placed the template so that the thinnest end was at one end of the fabric and the 5″ line on the template was at the other end of the fabric.  I cut ten segments from the neckties and ten from the gold background fabric.

 

Mark 1/2" from the edge

Mark 1/2″ from the edge

Cut a triangle off the tip

Cut a triangle off the tip

 

I wanted a tip similar to the end of a necktie for each segment of the dresden plate so I measured 1/2″ from the wide end of each segment, folded the segment in half along the length and cut from the 1/2″ mark to the fold.

 

Sew the segments together

Sew the segments together

Alternate gold segments with necktie segments

Alternate gold segments with necktie segments

 

Sew the segments together in pairs then fours and so on until you have all twenty segments included.  Sew the first and last segments together to close the circle.

 

 

Cut the circle for the dresden plate centre

Cut the circle for the dresden plate centre

Embroider the circle in place

Embroider the circle in place

The dresden plate template comes with a circle to applique in the middle of the dresden plate.  I cut a circle in the gold silk and then trimmed 1/4″ all the way round as I had used interfacing so that I wouldn’t need to turn under a hem.  I placed first the dresden plate patchwork and then the central circle on a 16.1/2″ square of the gold fabric and embroidered the edges of both with buttonhole stitch.

The flip and sew necktie quilt blocks

Lay a gold strip across the diagonal

Lay a gold strip across the diagonal

Sew a necktie strip to it

Sew a necktie strip to it

The third quilt block that I used in the necktie quilt was a simple sew and flip block using the remains of the silk neckties.  I began with an 8.1/2″ square of calico (muslin in America) and placed a 2.1/2″ strip of gold fabric across the diagonal with right side up.  I then cut random pieces of the silk neckties, trying to vary the widths of the fabric to give some variations in the blocks.  Sew one necktie strip to the edge of the gold strip with right sides together.  Sew in place with a 1/4″ seam, flip and press.

Continue sewing strips across the squares

Continue sewing strips across the squares

Cover the square with strips

Cover the square with strips

 

Continue adding strips using flip and sew to either side of the gold strip until the entire calico square is covered.  No need to cut the lengths accurately.  all the extra can be cut off later.

 

 

Trim the necktie strips in line with the square

Trim the necktie strips in line with the square

Trimmed block

Trimmed block

 

When each square is covered, turn it over so that the calico square shows and trim the excess necktie fabric in line with the edge of the square.  Make six of these 8.1/2″ flip and sew quilt blocks.

 

 

Sewing the necktie quilt together

Sewing the blocks together

Sewing the blocks together

That’s all the silk necktie quilt blocks complete so now it’s just a question of sewing them all together.  I placed the dresden plate patchwork quilt block in the centre and then alternated the four patch and flip and sew quilt blocks around it.  Sew two blocks together for the top and for the bottom of the dresden plate and then sew two strips of four quilt blocks together and sew them to the sides.

 

Finishing the necktie quilt

Pink binding for the necktie quilt

Pink binding for the necktie quilt

The necktie quilt top is now complete.  Layer with a 36″ square of wadding and backing fabric, quilt and bind.  For the quilting I used stitch in the ditch as I didn’t trust myself to free motion quilt across all that silk.  As I had used pink embroidery thread for the dresden plate quilt block, I decided to use pink fabric for the necktie quilt binding.

I’m thrilled with my necktie quilt and I hope that it’s given you ideas for ways that you can use your own silk neckties in your quilting projects.

 

Here’s the video:

 

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Comments

  1. I thought you were a genius..now I KNOW you are–what a great idea–I sure hope I can find those ties that belonged to my daddy–if I don’t–I will hit the yard sales and thrift shops–such a clever idea using the bottom shaping–thanks so much–

    • Thanks, Aquila. It’s surprising how often quilters want to use neck ties in their quilts. This quilt was intended to give you several different ideas of ways to use them.

    • June Veronica Greendale says:

      What an excellent idea – your instructions are very clear, thank you. My husband would like a waistcoat made from his old ties – wish me luck!

  2. Linda Kirkman says:

    What a great idea I would love to make this so beautiful. Thank you

  3. Jan Smith says:

    I want to make a Dresden tie quilt with 10″ blades. How do I figure the degree angle

    • Hi Jan. The length of the Dresden blades doesn’t affect the number you need for a circle. It’s the width of the blades that matters. My template needs 20 segments (18 degrees) to complete the circle, but I think that you can get templates with different widths.

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