LOG CABIN STAR QUILT

Log cabin star quilt

Log cabin star quilt

Log cabin quilts are just so easy to make and they make such eyecatching quilts.  For this quilt I have ended up with a star design, but I also show you two alternative layouts using the same log cabin quilt blocks.  The quilt measures 63″ by 84″ and I used forty eight 10.1/2″ log cabin quilt blocks.  I have used 3 yards each of light and dark fabric.

The whole idea of log cabin blocks is a square in the centre (the hearth of the log cabin) with strips of fabric added round it as the logs of the cabin.  The traditional block has two light logs and two dark logs in each round, splitting each block into light and dark more or less across the diagonal.

Cutting requirements (all 2″ strips)

three strips red for the hearth of the log cabin

eight strips first white and red fabric, seventeen strips of the second red fabric and white fabric,

twenty one strips of the third white and twenty two strips of the third red fabric

Making the log cabin quilt block

Complete log cabin quilt block

Complete log cabin quilt block

Sew red and white together

Sew red and white together

 

The central square and the first white log are both 2″ squares, so sew together three strips each of the red and white and cut the resulting two-fabric strips at 2″ intervals.  You need forty eight of these.

 

Place the first two squares on a white strip

Place the first two squares on a white strip

Keep adding pairs of squares as you sew

Keep adding pairs of squares as you sew

The second white log will go up the right hand side of the strip made above.  Using speed piecing means that you can make each quilt block much more quickly.  Place the two squares on a white strip with the white square on top.  Sew them together down the right hand side.  Stop sewing just before you reach the bottom of the red square and add another pair of squares with the white square just butting up to the bottom of the red square above it.  Continue adding pairs of squares down the length of the white strip.

Cut the strips between each pair of squares

Cut the white strip between eac pair of squares

Two white logs added

Two white logs added

 

Cut the white strip between each pair of squares.  This will give you a white strip on the side of the two squares.

 

 

 

Sew all the log cabins to a red strip

Sew all the log cabins to a red strip

Add the second red log

Add the second red log

The next log required is a red log across the top.  Lay down a red strip with right side up and begin to sew the log cabin blocks to this.  Make sure to place the last log that you sewed at the top when you place it on the red strip.  When all your log cabins have one red log, add the second red log as shown on the right.

Keep adding logs

The second round of white logs

The second round of white logs

Two complete rounds on the log cabin quilt block

Two complete rounds on the log cabin quilt block

Continue sewing the log cabins to strips of fabric to add logs.  Each round consists of two white logs and two red logs.  Always place the block with the most recent log on top and always sew down the right hand side.  Continue until you have three rounds of logs, when your block should be 11″ unfinished size.

 

Layout options for the log cabin quilt

Striped log cabin quilt layout

Striped log cabin quilt layout

Barn raising log cabin quilt

Barn raising log cabin quilt

Before I sewed the quilt blocks together I laid them out in a couple of different ways just to show you how many options there are.  On the left you see a striped log cabin quilt, made by just alternating the blocks across each row – one with white bottom left followed by one with white top right.  On the left you see a barn raising log cabin quilt using exactly the same blocks, just laid out in a different way.  The way to make this design is to begin with the white in the middle and then add the blocks around that to build up the pattern.

Layout of the log cabin star quilt

Log cabin star quilt layout

Log cabin star quilt layout

Log cabin star quilt layout

Log cabin star quilt layout

My preferred option is the log cabin star quilt.  For this layout you need to begin with the white in the middle again and work outwards.  If you look at the right hand photo, that white diamond in the middle is repeated on each side and above and below the centre.  If you get those in place then you are most of the way to completing the layout.  There are eight rows of six log cabin quilt blocks each.  Full details of the remaining steps of layering, quilting and binding can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

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Comments

  1. Really love all your quilts. Am just learning quilting and have learned a lot from all your lessons. You teach in a way that is so easy to understand. Am hoping to try the folded star cushion soon. Also added to my list to do is this log cabin quilt. Your quilts all look lovely. Well done for great website. Keep up the good work!!!

  2. Hi Rose,
    I really love your tutorials especially the one on cathedral windows. Thank you for your commitment to quilting, please keep the tutorials coming.

    Happy quilting!

    Belinda
    Chicago, IL USA

  3. Judy Gary says:

    I love the barn raising log cabin quilt, but I would like to make it for a king size bed. Will it work if I just add more quilt blocks all around the quilt?

    • Hi Judy. Yes, it should work fine. Just take care to keep the lines of colour running. You could also add to just the sides if you wanted the extra width. Rose

  4. Bonnie Jenkins says:

    Hi Rose, I am just learning how to do the log cabin quilt block as a ‘quilt as you go’. Thank you so much for the different layout ideas. I had no idea about the different options, they totally change the look of the log cabin quilt block.
    Thanks again for sharing your ideas. I look forward to your emails.
    Regards Bonnie

    • Thanks for your comments, Bonnie. I think that’s why we all love quilting – there are just so many different ways of doing everything.

  5. I just printed out your Octagon quilt pattern, I was wondering if you could make it so we could down load it to our computers. I have patterns on my Kindle and my computer and I don’t have room to store printed quilt patterns at the moment.

    • Hi LaRena. The best way to save a pattern is to click the ‘print friendly’ button at the bottom of the page. Then choose ‘print’ and when the printer choice screen opens up choose your pdf option. When the pdf is created it will give you an option of where to save it. Failing that, you could always bookmark the page or add it to favourites. Hope that helps. rose

  6. Hello Rose

    Only joined your website last night. I am so impressed with all the patterns you have and free as well! I have watched your videos and you explain everything so clearly.

    Glad I have joined.

    Margaret

  7. Hi Rose,
    Just wanted to say you are a real inspiration to ALL quilters. I have done 3 very small and very very rough quilts in the past, before I found computer skills, and now I have templates etc and your site I won’t look back. I’ve just pieced 48 squares for the star log cabing quilt and it looks georgous. A bit tricky to see pattern on a pale pink & white colour scheme but stuck with it and its fab. Daughter is waiting anxiously for it to finish. Can’t believe it was so quick to piece together. Keep up the fantastic work and good luck for many more happy quilting days.
    Janice

    • Thank you so much for your kind comments, Janice. I’m really glad you find the website helpful. The log cabin star is a great choice – I bet it looks lovely in the fabrics that you have chosen.

  8. Hi Rose, love the star quilt and want to make it in autumn colours for my parents. You said you used 3 yards of each colour to make it. Does that mean 1 yard of each of the 3 whites and 1 yard of each of the 3 reds? Just trying to figure out how much material I’m going to need. Thanks!

    • Hi Karen. Thanks for commenting. Yes, I did use one yard of each of the whites but you don’t need to use the same fabrics in each block so you could use a larger number of white fabrics if you were trying to use up stash, for example. The most important thing is getting a good contrast between the light and dark fabrics. Good luck with the quilt – I’m sure your parents will be thrilled with it.

  9. Thanks for getting back to me Rose. I’m thinking that I’m going to use 6 different colours, ranging from tan (being the lightest) to brown being the outside (darkest red on your quilt). I’m thinking tan, yellowy-orange (maybe batik), orange, red, burgandy & brown for the colours of autumn. Hopefully it turns out. Thanks again for sharing this quilt.

  10. Hi Rose, I am really inspired by your beuatiful log cabin, does the 2″ istrips and centre include seam allowance?

  11. Margaret John says:

    Hi Rose I just finished the Star pattern log cabin for my daughter. When I started I just meant to make a log cabin but when I found your page with the Star pattern it was perfect. My daughter’s name is Star. We chose red for a primary color and I think it turned out beautiful. Now I’ve started another log cabin for my great granddaughter. Your pattern and instructions are great! Thank you.

    • Hi Margaret. How lovely to be able to make such an appropriate quilt for your daughter. I love the log cabin block – it’s so versatile.

  12. Hi Rose, I just competed your log cabin star quilt and I wanted to show it to you. I am a senior in high school and when I saw your pattern I fell in love with it. Hopefully you will get back to me, i would love to see what you have to say about it. I used a contrasting black and red and white in the quilt. Thank you, Paige

    • Hi Paige. Well done. Log cabin is a lovely quilt pattern, isn’t it. I’d love to see a photo – you could either email me (rose@ludlowquiltandsew.co.uk) or post it on my facebook page. I’ll look forward to it.

  13. Michelle says:

    I understand the strips are 2 inches wide but how long are the strips?

    • Hi Michelle. The strips referred to in the pattern are cut the width of fabric. You then sew the partial block to a strip and cut off at the appropriate place for the block. You might find the video helpful to see what I mean.

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