HEREFORD QUILT


Hereford quilt pattern

Hereford quilt pattern

I have named this quilt the Hereford quilt because it’s based on some of the floor tiles in Hereford Cathedral.  I’m delighted with the way that it has turned out.  The main part of the quilt top is very simple but the second quilt border is a bit more challenging.  If you are a beginner quilter you may wish to finish after the first border – it will still be a very pretty quilt.  The Hereford quilt measures about 52″ square and I have used 1.3/4 yards of red, 1.1/2 yards of cream and 1 yard of brown fabric.

Cutting requirements for the Hereford quilt pattern

The quickest way is to cut strips of fabric across the width of fabric and then cut them to size.

2.1/2″ strips:  thirteen red, five cream, five brown

2.7/8″ strips:  five each in red, cream and brown

2″ strips: nine cream

 

 

 

Making the Hereford quilt

Cut squares and rectangles

Cut squares and rectangles

First row of the Hereford quilt

First row of the Hereford quilt

You will need to cut 2.1/2″ squares and 6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles in all three colours.  The quilt layout is seventeen rows of seventeen squares each – that’s counting each 6.1/2″ rectangle as three squares.  The first eight rows are repeated to give sixteen rows and then row 1 is repeated again to make the 17th row.

The first row is shown on the right:  four 6.1/2″ red rectangles with two brown squares and two cream squares between them.  I had to show it in two sections because the row was too wide for the camera otherwise.  Sew all the patchwork pieces together across the row using a 1/4″ seam.

First four rows of the Hereford quilt

First four rows of the Hereford quilt

Rows five to eight of the quilt

Rows five to eight of the quilt

The first four rows are shown on the left and rows five to eight on the right.  I don’t think there’s any benefit in me listing them all.  You can see the stepped pattern beginning to form.  If you look at the brown fabric, for example, you’ll see that there is a brown square in the top row then a brown rectangle underneath it in the second row, with a brown square underneath the right hand edge of the rectangle in the third row.  That pattern of square, rectangle, square follows for all three colours with the colour placement being red, brown, red, cream, red, brown and so on.

 

First eight rows of the quilt

First eight rows of the quilt

The final row of the quilt

The final row of the quilt

The point that you need to watch is the beginning and end of each row.  Check with the photos as you begin each row to make sure that you keep the pattern running.  Repeat rows one to eight to make the second half of the quilt and then add a further repeat of row one to make the seventeenth row.  That way the top and bottom of the quilt are the same.

 

 

First border for the Hereford quilt

First border of the Hereford quilt

First border of the Hereford quilt

For the first border I used 2″ strips of cream fabric to separate the main border from the quilt top.  Cut two at 34.1/2″ and sew them to the top and bottom of the quilt.  Cut two at 37.1/2″ long and sew one to each side of the quilt.  You may wish to stop there if you are not a confident quilter.  You will have a 37″ quilt which is pretty in its own right.  Or you may prefer to add the next two borders …

 

 

Second border for the Hereford quilt

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

For the second quilt border you will need to make half square triangles with brown and cream 2.7/8″ squares.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangles.  These are 2.1/2″ squares.

 

 

 

Strips for the quilt border

Strips for the quilt border

Sew the strips together offset

Sew the strips together offset

Make strips using two half square triangle units, one 2.1/2″ red square and two red triangles made by cutting a 2.7/8″ red square along one diagonal.  You will need thirteen of these strips for each side of the quilt, which means making fifty two of them altogether.  Lay these out as shown on the right, with each strip moved one square to the right compared with the one above it (technical term – offset).  The left hand red triangle will be sewn to the brown triangle of the row above it.

 

Quilt border panel

Quilt border panel

Sew the first border panel to the quilt

Sew the first border panel to the quilt

Make four border panels of thirteen strips each.  Sew the first one to one side of the quilt.  As you can see there is a diagonal edge extending out to the left hand side of the quilt.  Lay the second border panel in place along the next edge of the quilt and you will see that there is a triangular gap between the edges of the two border panels.

 

 

 

Quilt corner triangle

Quilt corner triangle

The corner triangle in place

The corner triangle in place

To fill this gap you will need a corner triangle.  Lay out the patchwork pieces shown on the left – four half square triangles, two red 2.1/2″ squares and four red triangles cut from 2.7/8″ squares.  Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows together to complete a triangle.  Check the photo to ensure that you have the half square triangles facing the correct way.  On the right you can see how the triangle fills the gap nicely while keeping the pattern running.  Make four of these corner triangles.

 

Sew the corner triangle to the second border panel

Sew the corner triangle to the second border panel

The fourth border panel needs two corners

The fourth border panel needs two corners

Sew the corner triangle to the second border panel and then sew this to the first border panel and the next edge of the quilt.  At the corner where you need to change direction, leave the needle in the fabric, lift the presser foot and swivel the two fabrics so that they are in line with each other for the next part of the seam.  I know that this is almost impossible to explain even with a photo, but I hope it will become clear when you see the video.

The third border panel is added in exactly the same way.  For the fourth border panel you will need a corner triangle at each end.  Sew these to the border panel and then sew to the quilt top in the same way as for the previous border panels.

Third quilt border for the Hereford quilt

Third border for the Hereford quilt

Third border for the Hereford quilt

For the third quilt border I used 2″ strips of cream fabric again – two at 49.1/2″ long for the top and bottom and two at 52.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.

That completes the Hereford quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.

You might be interested to see the photo of the original floor tile pattern in Hereford Cathedral along with some photos of the cathedral itself – you can see them here.

 

Here’s the video:

 

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Comments

  1. Nancy Newman says:

    The new format is very nice. Much easier to read and follow along. I particularly like all the pictures. Thank you.

  2. Liz Dicrescenzo says:

    Thank you for adding the “Print Friendly” feature. It makes it so much easier to keep your patterns handy. I also loved the pictures and articles on Hereford Cathedral.

  3. Gail Bennetto says:

    That is a beautiful quilt, I have a picture of the floor my husband were there about 4 years ago and I will put this one on my to do list
    thank you very much
    Kind regards
    Gail

  4. Pat Morton says:

    This is gorgeous. I wonder though, could you make strips totally connected and then cut apart at appropriate places to piece the quilt. I noticed that the odd number rows have a particular pattern and the odd rows have another. I am going to definitely make this quilt. I love it!

    • Hi Pat. I’m sure you could. I did think of piecing it that way, but then decided that just using squares and rectangles would make it simpler to explain.

  5. Wonderful! You always make things that look difficult easy to do. I would never think this would be easy to do, until you broke the pattern down for us. Thank you so much Rose! I always love getting your patterns. Nola

  6. Dear Rose,
    I love the Hereford Quilt very pretty and does not look too hard to do and thanks also for able to print it off, I never realized you were near Hereford been there many times on Holiday
    Thanks again for your Quilts keeps me going.
    Rhodax

    • Thanks, Rhoda. Hereford is probably our nearest city. My daughter and one of my sons went to sixth form college in Hereford. I think it’s a lovely city.

  7. What a nice design! I’m looking forward to trying this quilt. Someday I’d like to visit England. I’ve always wanted to see London and some specific sites, but now I want to see Hereford Cathedral as well. Thank you for all your work on this site. Your student from Sacramento, California, US.

  8. Thanks again for the wonderful quilt patterns. I enjoy going through them and save many [ too many ] for future plans. I will have to live for many many years to accomplish all my quilting “goals”

  9. Debra Friendly (Canada) says:

    Hello, Rose – Thanks for the printer friendly version. What I have done in the past is either save to favourites or doing a copy/paste to Word. I would only print it if I was going to make the project. Now I just have to save the printer friendly version as a .pdf!
    What I really liked about the Hereford pattern was that more complicated border. I’m going to try to remember that I have it and put it on a project (if I don’t make the Hereford).
    Thanks for this great site.

  10. Margaret Lowe says:

    Hi Rose,

    Have you a shop we can visit in Ludlow, my friend and I are planning a trip to Ludlow and would love to come and visit.

    Regards,

    Margaret

  11. Shirley says:

    Hi Rose, I have watched escape 2 the country & homes Under the hammer and I have taken photos of the wonderful tiles on the floors and windows designs to eventually make a quilt from some of the designs I have collected. I do love the quilt you have made. Keep up the good work. Shirley

  12. Trish Tarbuck says:

    Wow you have been busy Rose. I love this new layout because we can all see the news other members have to impart. I loved the border on this quilt and am going to have a bash.
    Off to Colne on Sunday morning to see the exhibition at Empress Mill, can’t wait.

  13. love this design i will be trying this one very soon

  14. Hello Rose I watch all your videos And they are so informative this quilt
    You have just made. Is lovely as all the quilts. I will have a go at makeing it and thank you for all the For them.

  15. I’m probably just a big ninny. I can see where/how many strips and the size of the squares/rectangles, but I cannot find how many squares/rectangles to cut from each strip. If you can find the time, would you please help clear this up for me? This is too pretty to pass up.
    Thanks.

  16. Thanks you so much Rose for all the details you put into these patterns,’
    makes life so much easier. Hoping to get over to the Malvern Show next week.

  17. Hi Rose. My oh My, what wonderful quilt patterns you give us. I love them all. I’m still a lazy beginner quilter for ten years now. I don’t like to hand sew, so anything I can machine stitch, I will. I have a Husqvarna Designer 1 Embroidery machine. so that’s what I do. I embroider quilts and include a lot of old time red work. which I love to do. Thank you so much for your wonderful tutorials. Mary Norma

  18. Margot K says:

    Rose, I look forward every week to seeing your next quilt design. This one is so very interesting. Thanks for inspiring and sharing.

  19. Marilyn Larkin says:

    Thank-you so much for the pdf format, so much simpler to download and store your precious patterns. Cathedrals have a wealth of beautiful art to borrow from, I took so many photos when we visited UK, in the hope I could transform them into quilts, your result is so good, and inspiring. thank-you, Bye the way, I love the Craftsy website. Great resource.

  20. Marta Alfaro says:

    Gracias nuevamente por compartir cosas ta hermosas. Bendiciones.

  21. That is so beautiful
    you make it all look so do able
    thank you.
    ROSE. you are a talented lady I wonder how many more cathedral floors have patterns which could be used n quilt making

  22. francesca says:

    Muchas g5racias ,hay tantas labores hermosas que no se por donde empezar.FRANCESCA

  23. Its nice design. thanks Rose.

  24. Hi Rose,Thank you so much for the wonderful patterns you make and then share with us.The Hereford one is stunning and I can’t wait to get started on it.You are my inspiration and I feel so privileged to be able to share all your amazing knowledge and skills.Thank you again Rose,Kind Regards Carole

  25. Hi Rose, I am just a beginner and love watching you making such beautiful quilts. You make it look so easy and the Hereford quilt is lovely, can’t wait to make it and hope that I can do your pattern justice. Your tutorials are inspirational and have given me the confidence to sew. Thankyou so much Rose. Kind regards. Tricia

    • Thanks, Tricia, for your very kind comments. I’m so glad if my patterns help your confidence – that’s what I try to do.

  26. Hello Rose,
    You’ve done it again. You have turned out another winner. The quilt is gorgeous – especially the border. Anybody who can take a picture of a tiled floor and turn out a beauty like this quilt …. well, all I can say is that you are one clever lady with lots and lots of talent. Keep up the good work.

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