SNOWBALL CUSHION COVER





Snowball cushion cover

Snowball cushion cover

I love the log cabin quilt block because there are so many different looks you can get using it.  I made this snowball log cabin quit block just to show a variation on log cabin and then realised that it would make a 19″ snowball cushion cover.

I have used different thicknesses of strip:  2″ strips for the red and 2.1/2″ strips for the white fabric.  Of course, the snowball log cabin quilt block could be made in different colours and using patterned fabric to give a totally different look.  The fron of the cushion cover is made using four log cabin quilt blocks with sashing between them.

Cutting requirements

white fabric:  2.1/2″ wide fabric cut into the following lengths:  2″, 4″, 5.1/2″, 7.1/2″ – four of each

red fabric:  2″ wide fabric cut into the following lengths:  2″, 4″, 5.1/2″, 7.1/2″ – four of each

for the sashing:  four strips of red fabric 2″ by 9″

for the cushion backing:  red fabric 19″ by 42″

Making the snowball quilt blocks

First pieces in the quilt block

First pieces in the quilt block

Build up the log cabin

Build up the log cabin

Begin with the red 2″ square.  This is the hearth of the log cabin.  with right sides together and using a 1/4″ seam sew the 2″ white strip to the bottom of the red square.  Working anti clockwise sew the 4″ white strip to the right hand side of the block.  Sew the red 4″ strip across the top and the 5.1/2″ red strip down the left hand side.

For the next round of logs, sew the 5.1/2″ white strip across the bottom of the block, the 7.1/2″ white strip on the right, the 7.1/2″ red strip across the top and the 9″ red down the left.

Making the front of the cushion cover

One layout for the snowball cushion cover

One layout for the snowball cushion cover

Alternative layout for the snowball cushion cover

Alternative layout for the snowball cushion cover

 

Make four of these log cabin quilt blocks.  There are several ways that you can put them together, these being the two of the more obvious ways.  I chose to go with the right hand version but I wanted to put sashing between the snowball quilt blocks.

 

 

Join the blocks with sashing

Join the blocks with sashing

Cut four lengths of 2″ red fabric 9″ long.  Sew one to adjoining sides of two blocks as shown on the left to create a pair of blocks.  Do the same with the other pair of quilt blocks.  Cut a 2″ square of white fabric and sew a length of sashing to either side of it for the middle of the snowball cushion cover.

Taking care to match the seams, sew the sashing to the bottom of the top pair of blocks and then to the top of the bottom pair of blocks.  Press the panel carefully on both wrong side and right side.

 

Make the back of the snowball cushion cover

Match the middle of the front and back panels

Match the middle of the front and back panels

For the back of the cushion, I find it easiest with a cushion of this size to cut one length 19″ by 42″.  This can be cut out of one strip 19″ wide cut across the width of the fabric.

Find the middle of the long edge of the backing fabric and of the cushion cover front.  Place the backing fabric with right side up and lay the snowball block on it, also with right side up.  Match the middle points of both.

 

 

Fold the backing fabric over the front panel

Fold the backing fabric over the front panel

Fold the other half of the backing over the front panel

Fold the other half of the backing over the front panel

Fold the lower edge of the backing fabric up over the top of the snowball block.  The fold of the backing fabric should be at the lower end of the snowball block.  Then fold the top edge of the backing fabric down over the snowball block.  There will be an overlap of 3 or 4″.  This makes the envelopopening on the back of the cushion for turning the cover right side out and putting in the cushion pad.

 

Zigzag the edge of the fabric to prevent fraying

Zigzag the edge of the fabric to prevent fraying

 

Using a 1/2″ seam sew all round the edge of the square that you have formed.  Then sew zigzag just outside the seam line all the way round to protect against any fraying.

Turn the snowball cushion cover right side out through the opening in the back, insert a cushion pad, sit back and admire.

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Comments

  1. Sandra Kerrod says:

    Hi Rose
    I’d like to make a log cabin cushion. I have a question, did you use wadding on the log cabin side?
    Thanks
    Sandra

    • Hi Sandra. I don’t think that I used wadding, but there is certainly nothing wrong with using it. I would definitely recommend a backing of some sort to protect the seams of the patchwork – I often just use a square of fabric to back the patchwork.

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