Cobwebs Quilt Block Pattern

Cobwebs quilt block

Cobwebs quilt block

The Cobwebs quilt block is an unusual but easy to make quilt block.  I’ve made it here as a 9″ square finished size.  Although I’ve used brown and yellow only here, this block would also be a useful one for using up scrap fabrics.

Cutting requirements for the cobwebs quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  four white

3.7/8″ squares:  two white

4.1/4″ squares:  two brown, two yellow




Quarter square triangle layouts

Quarter square triangle layouts

Make the quarter square triangles

I’ve chosen to make the quarter square triangle units with individual triangles rather than making several at a time as I usually do.  Cut the 3.7/8″ white squares along one diagonal and cut the 4.1/4″ brown and yellow squares along both diagonals.  These are shown at the top of the photo.

For the corner blocks of the cobwebs quilt block, place one white triangle with a brown and a yellow triangle.  Sew the brown and yellow triangles together first and then sew this pairing to the white triangle.

Make the central block using two yellow and two brown triangles.  Place these so that the yellow triangles are top and bottom while the brown triangles are on the sides.  Sew the triangles into pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.

Completed units

Completed units

The completed units are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Trim the corners where fabric sticks out.  You need to make four of the corner units with a white triangle but just one of the central block with yellow and brown triangles only.

Cobwebs quilt block layout

Cobwebs quilt block layout

Assemble the cobwebs quilt block

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.

Place the yellow/brown unit in the middle with a white square on each edge.  Lay the corner units in the remaining spaces with the white always on the outside, forming the corners of the block.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Quilt design ideas

For the basic quilt I have shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.  I felt that the design of the block became lost in this design.

With added sashing

With added sashing

So for my next attempt I added sashing between the blocks.  I felt that this allowed the block design to show through.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

Hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Nine Patch Plaid Quilt Block Pattern

Nine patch plaid quilt block

Nine patch plaid quilt block

The nine patch plaid quilt block is an extremely easy block.  It would work for a jelly roll quilt and it has also given me an idea for a quilt to match some curtains that I’m making.  I’ve made it here as an 18″ square finished size and there’s not a half square triangle to be seen!

It may look slightly lopsided, but that gives you a lot of scope for changing the design by rotating the blocks within a quilt.

Cutting requirements for the nine patch plaid quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  eight light blue, six white, four dark blue

9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  two white

15.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangle:  one dark blue

18.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangle:  one dark blue




Block layout

Block layout

Make the 9 patch plaid quilt block

Begin the layout with a white square in the middle. Place a dark blue square on each edge of the central square and add a light blue square in each corner of this central section.

Above the central section lay a 9.1/2″ white rectangle with a light blue square on either side of it.  Repeat for the bottom row.  Place three white squares down each side.  Finally place the 15.1/2″ dark blue rectangle across the top of the block and the 18.1/2″ dark blue rectangle down the left hand side.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

The reason that I have used white rectangles across top and bottom but individual squares down the sides is purely for simplicity.  By doing it this way I can sew the squares across each row before sewing them all together.

The squares without the dark blue rectangles make a 25 patch block.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  Finally sew the top dark blue rectangle to the block and then add the other dark blue rectangle to the left hand side.

Quilt suggestions

Basic quilt suggestion

Basic quilt suggestion

I have shown a quilt with the nine patch plaid block laid out in four rows of four with no rotations.  Quite a pretty block, but not terribly interesting.

Quilt design with rotations

Quilt design with rotations

Once you introduce rotations, though, you can transform the quilt design.  I think that this makes a far more interesting design.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Silver Lanes Quilt – Free Pattern

Silver Lanes quilt

Silver Lanes quilt

The Silver Lanes quilt block has such a lovely layout that I didn’t feel that it needed an alternate block.  I’ve made this quilt using just nine blocks which are all 18″ square finished size.  Each block contains purple, white and three shades of blue which gives the quilt plenty of interest.

The quilt measures 58″ square and I needed 1 yard each of white, dark blue and purple fabric, with 3/4 yard each of medium blue and light blue fabrics.  I don’t have any of that fabric left over, so there’s no special discount quilt kit this week.

If you wanted to make a rectangular quilt you could make twelve blocks (four rows of three) and this would give you a quilt 58″ wide by 76″ long.




Completed silver lanes quilt block

Completed silver lanes quilt block

Cutting requirements for the silver lanes quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty six white, thirty six light blue, seventy two medium blue

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty six each in light blue and dark blue, thirty six each in dark blue and white, eighteen each in purple and white

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ strips of purple fabric across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Layout of the central area

Layout of the central area

Make the silver lanes quilt block

I’ve shown the central area of the block first.  Place four purple/white half square triangles in the middle to make a pinwheel.

Around this pinwheel place two medium blue squares on each edge with a light blue square in each corner.

Silver lanes quilt block layout

Silver lanes quilt block layout

Now you can add the outer frame.  Place a white square in each corner of the block.  On either side of each corner, place a light blue/dark blue half square triangle.  These two light blue triangles together with the light blue square already in place make a rosebud shape which is repeated around each corner of the block.

In the middle of each edge of the block, lay two dark blue/white half square triangles.  Place these so that the two white triangles together form a larger white triangle pointing towards the middle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  This now measures 18.1/2″ square and you need to make nine blocks altogether.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Assemble the silver lanes quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  For the border you will need 2.1/2″ strips of purple fabric:  two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the silver lanes quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Mayflower steps

Mayflower steps

When I visited Torquay the week before last, I also spent a day in Plymouth, further along the coast.  What a lot of history there is in that city!  Along the harbour front there is an area called the Mayflower Steps.  This is where the Mayflower set off in 1620 taking the Pilgrim Fathers to settle in America.  You can’t see them in the photo, but the flags of both the UK and the USA fly beside the steps.

Eddystone Lighthouse

Eddystone Lighthouse

A little further along the coast and up a hill known as the Hoe I found a small lighthouse – actually too far inland to be useful.

I was fascinated to find that it’s known as Smeaton’s Tower and is in fact the top half of the Eddystone Lighthouse.

Eddystone light quilt block

Eddystone light quilt block

It used to function as a lighthouse but the top half was transported stone by stone to Plymouth where it was rebuilt.

When I made the Eddystone light quilt block I just assumed that it came from America, when in fact the lighthouse was here on the south coast all along!

Thanks for visiting my website.  For various reasons there will not be a quilt pattern next Friday.

 

Darting Birds Quilt Block Pattern

Darting Birds quilt block

Darting Birds quilt block

The Darting Birds quilt block pattern is amazingly simple but makes a lovely quilt.  It just goes to show that quilt blocks don’t have to be complicated to be pretty.  I’ve made it here as a 9″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the darting birds quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  one light green, two white

3.7/8″ squares:  one light green, two dark green, three white




Make the half square triangle units

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a white square right sides together with either a light green or a dark green square.  Mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This produces two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the green fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Make the darting birds quilt block

Darting birds quilt block layout

Darting birds quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.  Place a light green/white half square triangle in the top left position with a light green square in the top right and a dark green/white half square triangle between them.

Make the second row with a dark green/white half square triangle at each end and a white square in the middle.

For the third row you’ll need a white square followed by a dark green/white half square triangle and then a light green/white half square triangle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the darting birds quilt block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Darting Birds quilt suggestions

As a basic design, I have shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four blocks.  The block design does get rather lost in this design.

Alternate quilt design

Alternate quilt design

For an alternative design, I’ve added an alternate block of a diamond in a square.  This block could be made with half square triangles made from 4.7/8″ squares.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Nosegay Quilt – Free Pattern

Nosegay quilt

Nosegay quilt

The Nosegay quilt may look complicated, but each block is easy to make.  I was trying to capture the magic of early summer, nosegays at weddings and all that sort of thing.

The quilt measures 64″ square, using sixteen blocks which are 15″ square finished size.

I have used 1/2 yard of lilac, 1.1/4 yards of purple, 1.1/2 yards of green and 2 yards of white fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed nosegay quilt block

Completed nosegay quilt block

Fabric requirements for the Nosegay quilt

11.1/4″ by 6.1/4″ rectangles:  sixteen white, sixteen purple

8″ by 3″ rectangles:  sixteen white

10.1/2″ by 3″ rectangles:  sixteen white

5.7/8″ squares:  sixteen purple, sixteen white

3″ squares:  eighty green, sixty four lilac

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ strips of green across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangles

Use the 5.7/8 ” squares to make half square triangles.  Place a purple and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.

These are now 5.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the purple and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.  You need to make sixteen of them.

Make the nine patch units

Make the nine patch units

Make the nine patch units

These are dead simple – just 3″squares sewn together in rows of three.  Place green squares in the corners and the middle, with lilac squares in the other positions.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

These now measure 8″ square and you need to make sixteen of them.

Cut the rectangles along one diagonal

Cut the rectangles along one diagonal

Make the half rectangle triangles

Cut each 11.1/4″ by 6.1/4″ rectangle in half along one diagonal, making two triangles from each rectangle.

Place one purple triangle with one white triangle to re form a rectangle.

Sew the triangles together

Sew the triangles together

Sew the two triangles together along the diagonal seam.  Do be careful at this stage:  it’s very easy to sew these together incorrectly and end up with a weird shape that definitely isn’t a rectangle!

Mirror image rectangles

Mirror image rectangles

Note that you will end up with two different rectangles – they are mirror images of each other.  Sometimes this causes a problem, but for the nosegay quilt block you will need both versions of the rectangle.

These will be slightly larger than you require.  Trim them to 10.1/2″ by 5.1/2″.  I have suggested this to give your triangles better points – yes, mine do sometimes come out different sizes!  You will need sixteen of each version of the rectangle (thirty two in total).

Nosegay quilt block layout

Nosegay quilt block layout

Assemble the nosegay quilt block

Lay the pieces out as shown in the photo.  The nine patch unit is in the middle with an 8″ white rectangle above it and a 10.1/2″ white rectangle to the right of it.  Place the half square triangle in the bottom left corner with the white on the outside.

The half rectangle triangles take the remaining places – one of each kind.  Check the photo to make sure that you have the triangles placed correctly.

Make two columns

Make two columns

Sew the 8″ white rectangle to the nine patch unit and then sew the 10.1/2″ rectangle to the side.  Now sew the half rectangle triangle to the bottom to form one column.

On the left hand side, sew the half rectangle triangle to the half square triangle to make a second column.  Sew the columns to each other to complete the quilt block.

The block should measure 15.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make sixteen of them.

Rows 1 and 2

Rows 1 and 2

Finish the quilt top

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  Rows 1 and 2 are the same as each other.  Note the position of the half square triangle in order to get the rotation of the blocks correct.  In the first two blocks the half square triangle is on the top left of the block.  In the second two blocks, the half square triangle is on the top right.

Rows 3 and 4

Rows 3 and 4

Rows 3 and 4 are also the same as each other.  The half square triangles are in the bottom left position for the first two blocks.  They are in the bottom right position for the remaining two blocks.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the border

I have used 2.1/2″ strips of green fabric for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 64.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the nosegay quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

 

Torre Abbey ruins

Torre Abbey ruins

Last week I visited Torquay on the south coast to see a quilt exhibition at Torre Abbey Historic House and Gardens.  The quilts were supplied by the Quilter’s Guild.

The gardens and greenhouses of the Abbey were absolutely beautiful.

Flame Lily

Flame Lily

In one of the greenhouses I found a flame lily – this is the national flower of Zimbabwe and when I was a child we used to pick them for the house at Christmas time.  I don’t think that I have seen one growing for over 40 years, so I was jumping with excitement when I saw this one.  What an idiot I must have looked!

Beltane May Day Quilt Block Pattern

Beltane May Day quilt block

Beltane May Day quilt block

I designed the Beltane May Day quilt block as a celebration of today being the first day of May.  It’s got heaps of symbolism – or you could just regard it as a colourful scrappy quilt block!

I have made it as an 18″ square finished size using lots of different colours.

Cutting requirements for the Beltane May Day quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  seven white, four green, two purple, two lilac, one yellow

3.7/8″ squares:  three each in red and white, three each in blue and white, one each in blue and yellow, two each in purple and green, two each in lilac and green




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in all the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ square.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Please note that you will end up with one blue/white and one blue/yellow half square triangle surplus to requirements.  This is because the units are made in pairs but only an odd number of units is required of these two colour combinations.

Central area of the block

Central area of the block

Make the Beltane May Day quilt block

The central area of the block is floral, to represent summer flowers – you can tell I’ve been working in my garden over the weekend!

Place a four patch unit of purple and lilac in the middle.  Add a purple and a lilac half square triangle on each edge of the central four patch.  Lay them so that the green triangles together form larger green triangles pointing towards the middle.  Place a green square in each corner.

Full layout of the Beltane May Day quilt block

Full layout of the Beltane May Day quilt block

Now add the frame around this central area.  Across the top of the block lay five blue/white and one blue/yellow half square triangles.  Place these so that the blue triangles together form larger blue triangles pointing downwards.

The blue and white represent the sky and clouds while the yellow represents the sun.

Down the right hand side of the block lay one yellow and three white squares.

Across the bottom row place six red/white half square triangle units.  Lay them in pairs so that the red triangles together form larger red triangles pointing upwards.  These represent the fire used in the Beltane Fire Festival.  Finally lay four white squares up the left hand side of the Beltane May Day quilt block.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Quilt design suggestions

The basic quilt I’ve shown here uses nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.

Alternate design using rotations

Alternate design using rotations

As an alternative I rotated every other block and I was quite pleased with the way zig zag lines of red triangles began to form.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Ornament Quilt – Free Pattern

Ornament quilt

Ornament quilt

The idea for the Ornament quilt came from one of Owen Jones designs – but it looks very different now from the original design.  I have designed two different quilt blocks and alternated them across the rows.

The blocks are both very simple, with hardly any half square triangles to make.

The quilt measures 64″ square, using sixteen blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.  I needed 1.3/4 yards of white with 1.1/2 yards each of red and blue fabrics.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the ornament quilt

4.3/4″ squares:  eight blue

3.7/8″ squares:  sixteen red, eight each in blue and white

3.1/2″ squares:  sixteen blue

6.1/2″ by 2″ rectangles:  sixteen blue

9.1/2″ by 2″ rectangles:  sixteen blue

9,1.2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty two white

5″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  sixteen white, sixteen blue

9.1/2″ by 5″ rectangles:  sixteen red

3.1/2″ by 8″ rectangles:  sixteen blue, sixteen white

For the border you will need to cut six 2.1/2″ strips of red across the width of fabric.

First block layout

First block layout

Make the first block

Lay the patchwork pieces out in four rows as shown.  Place a red 5.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangle in the top and bottom rows, with a 3.1/2″ by 5.1/2″ blue or white rectangle on either side.  In the top row the white is on the left while in the bottom row the white is on the right.

Make the two middle rows with 3.1/2″ by 8″ blue and white rectangles side by side.  In the second row place the white on the left but in the third row place the white on the right.

Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows together to complete the block.  It now measures 15.1/2″ square and you need to make eight of these.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

You just need two half square triangles for each of the second blocks.

Place a 3.7/8″ blue and white square with right sides together.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the blue and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Sew a triangle to each edge of the square

Sew a triangle to each edge of the square

Make the diamond in a square

The central area of this block is a diamond in a square.  Cut the 3.7/8″ red squares along one diagonal to make two triangles from each square.  Place one triangle on each edge of the blue 4.3/4″ square.

Sew the top and bottom triangles to the square and then press them open with the seam allowances towards the red triangle.

Sew the triangles on 2 at a time

Sew the triangles on 2 at a time

Now you can sew the triangles to the sides of the blue square.  Press these open and you will have a blue diamond in a red square.

Note the triangle tips sticking out in the middle of each edge – trim these to reduce bulk in the seams.

Central area of second block

Central area of second block

Make the second block

Place the diamond in a square in the middle of the second block.  Sew a 2″ by 6.1/2″ blue rectangle to the top and bottom and sew 2″ by 9.1/2″ blue rectangle to either side.

Second block layout

Second block layout

For the next frame, sew a 3.1/2″ by 8″ white rectangle to the top and bottom of the block.  Make a column on the left with a 3.1/2″ blue square, another 3.1/2″ by 8″ white rectangle and a blue/white half square triangle at the bottom of the column.

On the right hand side, make a similar column but with the triangle at the top and the square at the bottom of the column.

Sew the three columns to each other to complete the block.  This now measures 15.1/2″ squares and you need to make eight of these.

Rows 1 and 3

Rows 1 and 3

Assemble the ornament quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four, alternating them across each row.

In rows one and three, begin with a diamond in a square block and then alternate across the rows.  Note that the diamond in a square blocks are placed with a blue square on top left of the block, while the stripey blocks are placed with the red rectangles vertical.

Rows 2 and 4

Rows 2 and 4

For rows two and four begin with a stripey block and then alternate the blocks across the rows.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Ornament quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 64.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the ornament quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Nantes mechanical elephant

Nantes mechanical elephant

Last weekend I visited Nantes in France for their quilt show.  What a wonderful weekend that was!  I have written about both the quilt show and the amazing mechanical elephant in a separate article.  You can read all about them here.

I’ve also included a short video of the elephant in action – he’s so realistic that he even blinks his eyes!

Old Fashioned Quilt Block Pattern

Old Fashioned quilt block

Old Fashioned quilt block

The Old Fashioned Quilt Block may seem an odd title as you could be forgiven for thinking that most quilt blocks are old fashioned, but that really is its name.  It’s a five patch block and I have made it here as a 14″ square finished size.  The block has a lovely flowery feel to it.

Cutting requirements for the old fashioned quilt block

2.7/8″ squares:  four each in red and white, four each in blue and white

2.1/2″ squares:  eight red, nine blue, four white

6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  four white




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 2.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place a white square right sides together with either a red or a blue square.  Mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This produces two half square triangle units which are now 2.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the red or blue and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Layout for one corner

Layout for one corner

Make a corner of the block

Make the four corners of the block and then join these together with the white rectangles.

Each corner has a simple nine patch placement.  In the bottom right there is a four patch unit of red and blue squares with the blue squares following the diagonal from bottom right to top left.  The final square along that diagonal is a white square.  Place a blue/white half square triangle on either side of the white corner with the two blue triangles forming a butterfly shape across the corner.

In the remaining two spaces place red/white half square triangle units.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  Make four of these corner blocks.

Old fashioned quilt block layout

Old fashioned quilt block layout

Assemble the old fashioned quilt block

Lay the corners out with a white rectangle between each pair of corners and a blue square in the middle.

You have three distinct rows now.  Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.

Basic quilt idea

Basic quilt idea

Quilt Ideas

For a basic quilt idea I have just shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.  This gives a very different quilt from what the individual blocks might suggest.

Alternate quilt idea

Alternate quilt idea

In order to showcase the blocks better, I then tried using an alternate block made using red and blue half square triangles sewn using 7.7/8″ squares.  I felt that this preserved the design of the quilt block a bit better.

In this case I have used just nine blocks total – five of the old fashioned quilt block and four of the alternate block.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

Nine Patch Jelly Roll Quilt Pattern

Nine patch jelly roll quilt

Nine patch jelly roll quilt

For this nine patch jelly roll quilt I wanted to make the entire quilt using just one jelly roll.  I nearly succeeded, only needing to add two strips of fabric from stash for the final border.  However, I know that jelly rolls do vary in the number of strips of fabric, so you may be able to complete this quilt with just the jelly roll.

There are lots of jelly roll quilt patterns, but I find that very often they require a jelly roll plus a lot of extra fabric.  The target that I set myself here was to use one jelly roll only.




Computer image to show the quilt design

Computer image to show the quilt design

If you haven’t come across jelly rolls before, they are rolls of fabric cut to 2.1/2″ wide and the strips all come from one fabric manufacturer so they usually all go together well.  It’s a great way of getting a wide variety of fabric without having to buy individual quantities of each fabric.  Although the strips are always the same width, the number of strips within a jelly roll can vary.

Because the fabrics vary so much, I have included a computer image of the quilt here using just a few colours so that you can see the quilt design more clearly.

Sort the fabric strips

Sort the fabric strips

Preparing the fabric

I began by sorting the strips into broadly dark, medium and light strips.  In fact I used the medium strips as either dark or light depending on what I needed and I also used them for the borders.

Make the stripey block

Make the stripey block

Make the stripey block

Sew together three strips of fabric in dark, light, dark colours.  This made a panel 6.1/2″ wide by the length of the strips.  Cut this at 6.1/2″ intervals to make a simple 6.1/2″ square.  This is the stripey block.  You should get six of these from each panel.  I found that I could also cut one 2.1/2″ strip from each panel.

Make the nine patch quilt block

Make the nine patch quilt block

Making the nine patch quilt block

For this block I needed panels of dark, light, dark fabric as above, but also some light, dark, light panels of fabric.  Cut these at 2.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles of fabric 2.1/2″ wide by 6.1/2″ long.

Place two dark, light, dark strips of fabric with a light, dark, light strip between them as shown in the top right of the photo.  Sew these three strips together to make the nine patch jelly roll quilt block.

Completed blocks

Completed blocks

The completed blocks

Both these quilt blocks are 6.1/2″ square at this stage.  You need to make twenty four of the stripey blocks and thirty nine of the nine patch jelly roll quilt blocks.

In order to do this, I needed to make nine panels of dark, light, dark fabric together with three panels of light, dark, light fabrics.

First three rows of the nine patch jelly roll quilt

Sew the blocks together in nine rows of seven blocks.

First three rows

First three rows

The first row is made with a stripey block at each end and five nine patch blocks between them.  Note that the left hand stripey block is placed with the stripes horizontal while the other stripey block has the stripes vertical.

In the second row the blocks are reversed, with a nine patch block at each end and five stripey blocks between them.  Note that the stripey blocks alternate between horizontal and vertical placements.

For the third row place a three nine patch blocks in the middle with a vertical stripey block either side of them and a nine patch block at each end.

Central area

Central area

Central area of the quilt

The next four rows are very similar to each other.  Each row has three nine patch blocks in the middle and a nine patch block at each end.  Place the stripey blocks in the second and sixth places of each row.

The stripey blocks alternate down the column, beginning with a horizontal block, then vertical beneath it and so on.  This is the only difference between the rows.

Last two rows

Last two rows

Final two rows of the nine patch jelly roll quilt

The last two rows are similar to the first two rows.  For row eight place a nine patch block at each end with five stripey blocks between them.  In row nine place a stripey block at each end with five nine patch blocks between them.  Check whether the stripey blocks are horizontal or vertical.  My intention with the corner blocks was to have them form a sort of circle around the quilt – that’s why they are placed both horizontally and vertically.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows together.  At this stage the quilt top measures 42.1/2″ by 54.1/2″.

Leftover fabric

Leftover fabric

Make the top and bottom quilt borders

Now my target was to use up the remainder of the jelly roll strips for the borders.  I had six complete strips of fabric and some 6.1/2″ strips left.  Note that you may have a different amount left over as jelly rolls do vary.

Top and bottom borders

Top and bottom borders

I decided to make three borders for the top and bottom of the quilt.

For the first border I used a strip of light fabric.  In the second border I used seven of the 6.1/2″ strips – that’s twenty one squares altogether.

I made the third border with a strip of medium fabric.  Sew the three strips together and sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.

Add the side borders

Add the side borders

Make the side borders

By now I was really running short of fabric strips!  I had one light strip left which I didn’t want to use for these borders.  I cut two medium 2.1/2″ strips from my stash and used them with the remaining medium strip and a few individual squares of medium fabric to make two 66.1/2″ lengths for the sides.

That completes the nine patch jelly roll quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Peckforton Castle

Pckforton Castle

My travels last week took me into Staffordshire to somewhere called Peckforton Castle.  What a treat that was!  It’s a genuine castle, although not as old as many of our castles.  It was built in the mid 19th century by a railway magnate for his family.  Outside it looks centuries old but inside there are all mod cons – and two lovely restaurants.

 

California Chimney Quilt Block Pattern

California chimney quilt block

California chimney quilt block

The California Chimney quilt block is a delight – easy to make and using three different shades of blue with white.  It is classified as a five patch block and I have made it here as an 18″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the California chimney quilt block

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  four white, two medium blue

3.1/2″ squares:  four white, four medium blue

3.7/8″ squares:  two each in light blue and white, two each in light blue and dark blue, four each in light blue and medium blue




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the central section

Central section

Central section

I’m showing the central area first.  This is a more simple way of seeing the layout and all the half square triangles are used up in this section.

Place the four dark blue/light blue half square triangles in the middle.  Make sure that the dark blue triangles form a diamond in the middle of the block.

On each edge of this central area place two medium blue/light blue half square triangles.  Make sure that the medium blue triangles form a larger triangle pointing towards the middle.  In each corner of this section place a light blue/white half square triangle with the white on the outside, forming the corner of the section.

Full layout

Full layout

California chimney quilt block full layout

For the full layout you now need to add just one more frame.  The top and bottom rows are made with a 6.1/2″ medium blue rectangle in the middle and a white rectangle on either side.

For the sides, place two medium blue squares in the middle of each edge with a white square on either side.

I have chosen to use rectangles in the top and bottom rows but pairs of squares down the sides purely to simplify the sewing.  This way it is straightforward now to sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.

Basic California chimney quilt

Basic California chimney quilt

California chimney quilt ideas

For the basic quilt design I have shown nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.

With added green

With added green

As an alternate design I have simply added one green square in one corner of each block.  I was quite surprised at how much difference this made to the overall look of the quilt.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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