Owen Jones Quilt – Free Pattern

Owen Jones quilt

Owen Jones quilt

The Owen Jones quilt is perhaps wrongly named because I’ve designed this quilt very very loosely on an Owen Jones pattern design.  You can see what Wikipedia says about him:

Owen Jones (15 February 1809 – 19 April 1874) was an English-born Welsh architect. A versatile architect and designer, he was also one of the most influential design theorists of the nineteenth century. He helped pioneer modern color theory, and his theories on flat patterning and ornament still resonate with contemporary designers today.

Original Owen Jones design

Original Owen Jones design

The design that I began working from – as you can see the connection between this and the quilt is fairly loose!

Please don’t look at it and think it looks too complicated for you.  I have only used half square triangles, squares and rectangles to design the blocks.




The quilt measures 52″ square and I have used nine 16″ square (finished size) blocks. You need to use 3/4 yard each of dark blue and white with 1 yard of red and 1.1/4 yards of light blue fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the Owen Jones quilt

2.7/8″ squares:  nine each in dark blue/light blue, sixty three each in light blue/white, fifty four each in dark blue/white

4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six dark blue

2.1/2″ squares:  thirty six light blue

2.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles:  eighteen light blue, eighteen red

For the border you need to cut five 2.1/2″ strips of red across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangles

Use the 2.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 2.1/2″ squares.

You need to make these in light blue/white, dark blue/white and light blue/dark blue.

Make the central area of the block

Layout of the central area

Layout of the central area

I have shown the layout of the central area separately before the full layout for the block.

Place four light blue squares in each corner of this area.  The light blue/dark blue half square triangles are placed at the end of the fourth row and the beginning of the fifth row.  Everywhere else there are light blue/white or dark blue/white half square triangles only.

Rather than trying to list the squares individually, I think it’s best for me to point out the larger shapes within the area which can be used to make sure that the placement is correct.

The most obvious of these are the two dark blue diamonds within white frames and the two crown shaped dark blue shapes in the middle – the left hand one pointing upwards while the right hand one points downwards.  Running down the sides of the central area, there are two larger light blue triangles formed by placing two light blue triangles side by side.

When you are happy with the placement, sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Owen Jones quilt block layout

Owen Jones quilt block layout

Complete the Owen Jones quilt block

Now you can add the sides to the block.  On each side add first a red strip and then a light blue strip.  Place a 4.1/2″ dark blue rectangle above and below each pair of strips – so that’s four needed for each block.

Sew the long strips together first

Sew the long strips together first

Begin by sewing the two long strips to each other on each side.  Then you can add the dark blue rectangles above and below.

You should now have three columns.  Sew these to each other to complete the block.  You need to make nine of these.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the Owen Jones quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Some of the blocks are rotated, which is what gives the quilt its deliciously complicated look.

In rows one and three place the blocks at each end with the red strips running from top to bottom, while in the middle block the red strips run from side to side.

Row two

Row two

For row two place the blocks so that the ones at each end have the red strips running horizontally while the block in the middle has the red strips running vertically.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of the red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom together with two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Owen Jones quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Stitches 2017

Stitches 2017

Last week I went to a trade fair at the NEC.  It’s known as Stitches but covers knitting, papercraft and many other crafts.  There were lots and lots of fabric manufacturers there so it was a wonderful day.

This sheep really took my fancy – his body is made using something similar to puff quilting – isn’t he gorgeous!

Temple Court Quilt – Free Pattern

Temple court quilt

Temple court quilt

For the Temple Court quilt I have used a very simple alternate block in the middle of the quilt and I think it has made a quilt that has a medallion look to it.  Although the Temple Court block is a stunner, it can be made with only squares and half square triangles.  Altogether I have used nine blocks which are all 16″ square finished size.

The quilt measures 52″ square, using 1.1/4 yard of light purple, 3/4 yards of dark purple with 1.3/4 yards of white.  The two purples that I have used are rather lovely dragonfly fabrics by Inprint Makower.  As ever, you can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the temple court quilt

8.7/8″ squares:  two purple, two white

4.1/2″ squares:  thirty two lilac, eight white

4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  sixty four white

3.3/8″ squares:  thirty two lilac

2.7/8″ squares:  thirty two each in lilac and white, with a further sixty four in white only

2.1/2″ squares:  thirty two lilac

For the border you will need five 2.1/2″ purple strips cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

You need to make half square triangles using both the 2.7/8″ squares and the 8.7/8″ squares.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will give you two half square triangle units which are now either 2.1/2″ or 8.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.  Incidentally, in case you’re wondering – the seam allowances are pressed towards the darker fabric purely because then there’s less chance of the seam allowance showing through on the top of the quilt.

Alternate block layout

Alternate block layout

Make the alternate block

This is really so simple.  Place the four large half square triangles in two pairs with the purple always towards the middle, forming a diamond shape.

Sew the squares together within each pair and then sew the pairs to each other.  That’s it – the central block is complete.  It measures 16.1/2″ square and you need to make just the one block.

Make the diamond in a square sections

Diamond in a square sections

Diamond in a square sections

The diamond in a square sections can be made with four half square triangle units if you prefer, but I prefer to make them by sewing triangles to the edges of a square.

Cut the remaining 2.7/8″ white squares along one diagonal to give two triangles per square.  Begin with a 3.3/8″ lilac square and place a triangle on each edge.  Sew these to the square in pairs – first sew the triangles to the sides of the square.

Add the remaining triangles

Add the remaining triangles

Press the triangles open and then sew the remaining two triangles to the top and bottom.

Trim the triangle tips that stick out in the middle of each edge.  These units are now 4.1/2″ square and you need to make thirty two of them.  If you did want to use half square triangles, you would need four hst’s made from 2.7/8″ squares for each unit.

Central area of the block

Central area of the block

Make the temple court quilt block

Finally we can lay out all the pieces to make the block.  Place a 4.1/2″ white square in the middle with a pair of half square triangles on each edge and a 2.1/2″ lilac square in each corner.  Note that the lilac triangles together form larger lilac triangles pointing away from the middle.

Temple court quilt block layout

Temple court quilt block layout

The outer frame of the block is now very simple.  Place a 4.1/2″ lilac square in each corner.  Between each pair of corners place a diamond in a square unit with a white rectangle on either side of it.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the pieces togethe across  the top and bottom rows.  In the central row you need to sew together the pieces vertically first – into columns.  On each edge sew the rectangles to either side of the diamond in a square.  In the middle sew each pair of half square triangles together and then sew them to the central square.  Outside of this, sew the two squares and two half square triangles together to make a column either side of the central column.

Now you can sew the pieces together across this central section.  Sew the three rows to each other to complete the temple mount quilt block.  This is now a 16.1/2″ square and you need to make eight of them.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.

Make rows one and three with three temple mount blocks sewn together in a row.

Row two

Row two

In row two place the alternate block in the middle with a temple block on either side of it.  Sew the blocks together across the row.

Finally sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of purple fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the temple mount quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Winter sunshine

Winter sunshine

Last week I was very slow to reply to emails and comments – my apologies for that.  I was in Spain grabbing a few days of winter sunshine and my internet access was very limited.

I love walking along the beach – even in the winter I’m happy to walk ankle deep in the water.  I’m afraid I’m far too much of a wimp to actually swim in the sea at this time of year.

Bird of Paradise flowers

Bird of Paradise flowers

These Bird of Paradise flowers were a welcome surprise.  I hadn’t expected to see them so early in the year.

Tea Basket Quilt Pattern

Tea basket quilt

Tea basket quilt

I’ve used a simplified version of the tea basket quilt block together with a simple diamond in a square block to make this quilt.  I’ve also added some blue to the block – you know how I like my blues!

The quilt measures 54″ square and I have used sixteen 12″ finished size blocks.  Fabric requirements are 1.3/4 yards of blue, 1.1/4 yards of brown, 3/4 yard of white and 1/2 yard of yellow.

Cutting requirements for the tea basket quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  thirty two brown, eight blue, twenty four white

3.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in yellow and white, eight each in yellow and brown, eight each in brown and white

6.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in blue and brown

For the border you will need five 3.1/2″ strips of blue fabric cut across the width of fabric.




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in the colour pairings listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Repeat with 6.7/8″ squares to make 6.1/2″ half square triangle units for the alternate blocks.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Tea basket quilt block layout

Tea basket quilt block layout

Make the tea basket quilt block

Lay the squares out in four rows of four.  There are brown 3.1/2″ squares in three corners, with a white square for the fourth corner.  The blue square in the second row is an addition that I made to tie in with the alternate blocks.  The yellow triangles form a butterfly shape across the white corner while the brown triangles form one across the diagonally opposite brown corner.

In the middle section, a brown square with two brown triangles form a larger triangle.  I think that this is a fairly easy block to layout because any wrong placements will show up quite quickly.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the tea basket quilt block.  YOu need to make eight of these.

Alternate block layout

Alternate block layout

Make the alternate block

This block is even more simple – just four of the large half square triangles.  Place these so that the blue is always on the inside, forming a blue diamond within the brown square.

Sew the squares into pairs and then sew the pairs to each other.  You also need to make eight of this block.

Assemble the tea basket quilt

Row one

Row one

The blocks are laid out in four rows of four.  Each row contains two tea basket blocks and two alternate blocks.  Row one is made with two alternate blocks in the middle.  The blocks at the ends of the row are placed so that the tea baskets point towards the corners.

Row two

Row two

For row two the alternate blocks are at the ends of the row.  The tea basket blocks are placed so that they point towards the top corners.

Row three

Row three

In row three the blocks are the same but the tea baskets point towards the bottom corners.  This gives you that X shape in the middle of the quilt.

Fourth row

Fourth row

Finally in the fourth row the tea basket blocks are at the ends, pointing towards the bottom corners.  The two alternate blocks are in the middle of the row.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of blue fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.

That completes the tea basket quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

What a time span!

What a time span!

St Martins Church, Birmingham

The rag market in Birmingham is situated just below the bullring shopping centre.  So is St Martins church.  The other day I happened to look up and realise what an amazing time span was covered by the war memorial on the left, a glimpse of the bullring shopping centre in the middle and St Martins church on the right.

St Martins is a Victorian building, built on the site of a 13th century church.  It was originally the parish church of Birmingham and is a lovely calming place to visit.

The Bullring dates back to medieval times, but the most recent version of the shopping centre was completed in 2003.

War memorial and St Martins church

War memorial and St Martins church

The Tree of Life war memorial was dedicated in 1993 and remembers the blitz when Birmingham had to endure 365 air raid alerts and 77 actual air raids.

So much history in one place!

V&A Museum Floor Tile Quilt Pattern

V&A museum floor tile quilt

V&A museum floor tile quilt

I have based the V&A museum floor tile quilt on the corners of a floor tile design in the museum.  There are many beautiful things to see in the museum, but I can’t help looking down at my feet wherever I go because there is so much inspiration down there on the floor.

I have simplified the design and also added some red to give some pop to the design.  I’m  hoping that I have achieved the aim of showing the blue square frame in the middle weaving over and under the grey and black strips.

You’ll be pleased to hear that this quilt is made with 2.1/2″ strips only – not a half square triangle in sight.




Original tiles

Original tiles

The quilt measures 50″ square, using sixteen 10″ finished size blocks.  Fabric requirements are 1/4 yard of red, 3/4 yard each of blue and black with 1 yard of grey fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

Cutting requirements for the V&A museum floor tile quilt

Completed blocks

Completed blocks

The fabrics are all 2.1/2″ wide strips, so I have just specified the lengths of the pieces below.

Red fabric:  seventeen 2.1/2″ squares, sixteen 4.1/2″ strips

Blue fabric:  sixteen 2.1/2″ squares, sixteen 4.1/2″ strips, sixteen 8.1/2″ strips, sixteen 10.1/2″ strips

Black fabric:  sixteen 2.1/2″ squares, sixteen 4.1/2″ strips, thirty two 9.1/2″ strips

Grey fabric:  sixteen 2.1/2″ squares, sixteen 6.1/2″ strips, four 22.1/2″ strips, two 46.1/2″ strips, two 50.1/2″ strips

V&A floor tile quilt block layout

V&A floor tile quilt block layout

Make the individual blocks

Lay the strips out as shown.  The 10.1/2″ blue strip is across the top of the block, with the 8.1/2″ blue strip down the left hand side.  8.1/2″ black strips are placed horizontally above and below the central area.  The central area is made with a 4.1/2″ black strip on the left, a 4.1/2″ red strip above a red square.  To the right of these are a black square and a 4.1/2″ blue strip.

Sew the central area first

Sew the central area first

Sew the central area together first:  that’s the red strip with a black square in one row and the red square with a blue strip in the other row.  Join these two rows as shown on the right of the photo.

Add the black strips

Add the black strips

Now you can sew the black strip to the side of the unit and then black strips to the top and bottom.  Finally sew the blue strip to the left hand side and then the blue strip across the top of the block.

It really is a very simple block to make!

Make the sashing strips

Make the sashing strips

Make the sashing strips

For the sashing, sew together a 6.1/2″ grey strip with first a blue square and then a grey square.

You need to make sixteen blocks and sixteen sashing strips.

One quarter of the quilt

One quarter of the quilt

Assemble the V&A museum floor tile quilt

Make the quilt in four quarters, using four blocks for each quarter.  Form one row with two blocks and a sashing strip between them.  For the second row sew together two sashing strips with a red square between them.  In row three place two blocks with a sashing strip between them.

Rotate the blocks so that the blue is always on the outside.  This is how you form the blue square frame weaving over and under the black and grey strips.

Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  Make four of these sections.

Sew the four quarters together

Sew the four quarters together

For the the sashing between the quarters use the 22.1/2″ grey strips with just the one red square in the middle.  So rows one and three consist of two blocks with a grey strip between them.  Make the second row with two grey strips and a red square between them.

Sew the sections together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the border

Add the border

Add the quilt border

Finally, for the border I have basically continued the sashing.  You’ll need two lengths of 46.1/2″ across the top and bottom and two lengths of 50.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the V&A museum floor tile quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Queues of people!

Queues of people!

Birmingham Back to Backs

Yesterday I went into Birmingham centre and was rather surprised to see crowds of people just around the area that I was visiting.  It turned out to be the auditions for Britain’s Got Talent.

There were huge numbers of people waiting to get in to the theatre – they were very good natured and every now and then there was a huge roar of approval, presumably when someone well known arrived.

 

Back to backs

Back to backs

The reason that I was there was to visit a place called Back to Backs, which was absolutely fascinating.  These are houses set around a courtyard, but each house had another one attached to the back of it.  They had re created the interiors of the houses to show how they would have been at various times.  For this they had used actual families that had lived in the houses.

The earliest was set up as 1870, when the houses were built.  So much attention had been paid to making the details accurate that it was a real treat to see them.  In the most modern house – around 1970 – a tailor had been the tenant and there was evidence of his sewing all over the house.  I really wish that I had been able to take photos inside the house to show you.  I saw two sewing machines – one the treadle type which I’m sure you have seen, but the other was even older than that.  It looked very big and bulky and really interesting.  Apparently this tailor was so good that people used to come to him from London to get their suits made.

Cactus Pot Quilt – Easy Free Pattern

Cactus pot quilt

Cactus pot quilt

I’ve made the cactus pot quilt using two different colours for the block and some large white squares.  I feel that this gives a great feeling of space and freshness.

All the blocks are 12″ square finished size.  The quilt measures 78″ square and I have used 3.3/4 yards of white, 1.7/8 yards of purple, 1.1/4 yards of lilac with 1/4 yard of green fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the cactus pot quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  one hundred and forty white

3.7/8″ squares:  forty eight each in lilac and white, eight each in green and white, twenty eight each in purple and white

6.7/8″ squares:  twelve each in purple and lilac, two each in purple and green

12.1/2″ squares:  eight white

For the border you will need eight 3.1/2″ purple strips cut across the width of fabric

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares in the colour pairings listed above for the small half square triangle units.  Place a white square with either a lilac, green or purple square right sides together.  Mark a line along one diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Repeat with the 6.7/8″ squares which will give you 6.1/2″ squares.

Cactus pot quilt block layout

Cactus pot quilt block layout

Make the cactus pot quilt blocks

Lay the squares out in four rows of four.  Place a large half square triangle in the middle.  There are two lilac/white half square triangles above the central square and on the left hand edge.  On the right hand side and beneath the central square place a white square and a purple/white half square triangle.  The four corners are all white squares.

Look for the larger shapes.  Note that the two lilac triangles around the top corner form a butterfly shape.  In the bottom corner the white square with two white triangles form a larger white triangle.

Sew the squares together across the top and bottom rows.  For the middle two rows you need to sew the two small squares together first and then sew them to the central square.  Sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  You need to make twenty four of this version of the block.

Layout for alternate block

Layout for alternate block

Make the alternate version of the block

Lay the squares out exactly the same as for the block above, but swap the lilac shapes for green.

Make the block in exactly the same way.  You need to make four of this version of the block.

Assemble the cactus pot quilt

Row one

Row one

Lay the blocks out in six rows of six.

Row one is made with a green cactus at each end, two lilac blocks in the middle with a 12.1/2″ white square between the lilac and the green blocks.  Check the rotation of the blocks from the photos.

Row two

Row two

In row two there’s a white square at each end enclosing four lilac cactus blocks.  Again check the rotation of the blocks in the photo.

Row three

Row three

For row three you will need six lilac cactus blocks.  Check the photo to be sure you have all the blocks facing the correct way.

Row four

Row four

Row four is very similar to row three, but with different rotations of the blocks.  There are again six lilac blocks.

Row five

Row five

In row five the blocks are the same as in row two, but with the blocks facing in different ways.

Row six

Row six

Finally in row six you have the same blocks as row one, but this time the cactus in each block is facing downwards, two of them towards the left and two towards the right.

Add the border

Add the border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 3.1/2″ strips of purple fabric.  Piece together two 72.1/2″ strips for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two 78.1/2″ lengths for the sides of the quilt.

That completes the cactus pot quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Postcards from the V&A

Postcards from the V&A

Last week, as you know I went to the V&A Museum to see some rather spectacular embroidery – as well as lots of other fascinating things.  The exhibition was called Opus Anglicanum.  I had a wonderful afternoon there and you can see some photos here.

Pub Floor Tile Quilt Pattern

Pub floor tile quilt

Pub floor tile quilt

The design for the pub floor tile quilt pattern comes to you, of course, from the floor tiles in a pub that I visited recently.  They served a lovely red wine, so obviously it was a tough job researching this design to show you!

Floor tiles

Floor tiles

The quilt measures 78″ square.  I have used 1/2 yard each of grey and white fabrics, 1 yard each of black and blue with 1.3/4 yards of red and 2.1/2 yards of cream fabric.  I have tried to stay true to the colouring of the original floor tiles as far as possible.  The quilt blocks are 12″ square finished size.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the pub floor tile quilt

Central block:  four 3.1/2″ red squares, two 2.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ cream rectangles, three 2.1/2″ by 8.1/2″ rectangles, two 2.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles

Corner blocks:  four 4.1/2″ cream squares, four 5.1/4″ black squares, four 5.1/4″ grey squares, eight 4.7/8″ grey squares, sixteen 3.3/8″ by 6.1/8″ white rectangles

For the rest of the quilt:

12.1/2″ by 44.1/2″:  four cream

12.1/2″ squares:  eight red

Black fabric:  twelve 12.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips, four 40.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ strips

2.1/2″ squares:  eight blue

For the borders you will need to cut eight 2.1/2″ strips of red and eight 3.1/2″ strips of blue across the width of fabric.

Central block layout

Central block layout

Make the central quilt block

Lay the patchwork out as shown in the photo.  There are four red 3.1/2″ squares with an 8.1/2″ cream strip between them horizontally and two 3.1/2″ cream strips between them vertically.  At each side there’s an 8.1/2″ cream strip and at the top and bottom there’s a 12.1/2″ cream strip.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the red squares together in columns with the cream strips between them. Then you can sew the columns together across the central area.  Finally add the cream strips at the top and bottom.  You only need to make one of this block.

Central area of block

Central area of block

Make the diamond in a square

These are a little more complicated, but still easy if you take it in small steps.

Cut a 5.1/4″ black square along both diagonals to make four triangles.  Place one triangle on each edge of the 4.1/2″ cream square.  Sew the triangles to the square on the top and bottom, press and then sew the remaining two triangles to the sides.  Press the triangles open and trim the middle of each edge where the fabric sticks out.

Make the central row of the block

Central row of the block

Central row of the block

Use this diamond in a square to form the central row of the block.  Place a white rectangle on each side with a grey triangle at each end of the row.  These triangles are made by cutting a 4.7/8″ square along one diagonal.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across the row.

Add the top section

Full layout of the corner block

Full layout of the corner block

The top section of the block is made in two rows.  Place a white triangle above the central row with a grey triangle on either side. These triangles are made by cutting a 5.1/4″ grey square along both diagonals to form four triangles.

Then above that row place a larger grey triangle (made from a 4.7/8″ square).  Note that the two smaller grey triangles are placed so that the right angled corner (the square corner) lie against the bottom of the white rectangle.

Complete the corner block

Add the top of the block first

Add the top of the block first

Sew these pieces together across the row and then sew them to the central row.

The bottom part of the block is very similar, but the smaller grey triangles are placed so that the square corners lie against the top of the white rectangle, rather than the bottom as they were in the top section.

Sew these two rows to the central row to complete the block.  You need to make four of these.

Assemble the central area

Layout for central area

Layout for central area

Having made the blocks, it is easy now to pull everything together.  Place the eight 12.1/2″ red squares around the central block.  Place two 12.1/2″ black strips between each pair of squares so that each row contains three blocks and two black strips.

Sew the blocks together across the rows.

Add sashing strips between the rows

Add sashing strips between the rows

In order to join the rows to each other, make two sashing strips of three black strips with two blue squares between them.  Now you can sew the rows together.

Add sashing around this area

Add sashing around this area

In order to complete the black sashing around the central area, sew a 40.1/2″ strip of black to the top and bottom.  Sew a blue square to both ends of the remaining two 40.1/2″ black strips and sew these to the sides.

Add the outer frame

Add the outer frame

Add the outer frame

This bit is really simple.  First sew a 40.1/2″ cream strip to the top and bottom.  Now sew a corner block to each end of the remaining two cream strips.  Sew these strips to the sides of the quilt.

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 68.1/2″ for the top and bottom together with two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.

Finally add the second border of 3.1/2″ strips of blue.  You’ll need two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the pub floor tile quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding – plenty of open spaces for quilting.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Sarehole Mill

Sarehole Mill

J R R Tolkien, author of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, spent part of his childhood in Birmingham. The other day (when I was lost), I happened upon a sign for Sarehole Mill.  Tolkien and his brother used to play in and around the mill.

It was too late in the day for me to visit the inside of the mill, but I was able to wander around the outside and it’s definitely somewhere I will return to.

Sarehole mill pond

Sarehole mill pond

It’s such a calm place – an oasis of quiet set within some quite busy roads.  I see that there is a Tolkien trail around Birmingham, so that’s a must for the summer.

Jacobs Ladder Diamond Quilt

Jacobs ladder diamond quilt

Jacobs ladder diamond quilt

I’ve made the Jacobs Ladder Diamond quilt using a variation of the Jacobs Ladder quilt block, but I’ve used rotations of the block to give the diamond design and I’ve put a red square in the middle to tie in with the red border.

The quilt measures 84″ square and I’ve used thirty six 12″ square blocks.  Fabric used was 1.1/4 yards of dark blue, 1.3/4 yards of medium blue with 2 yards of light blue, 3/4 yard each of yellow and green and 1.3/4 yards of red.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.  I have deliberately used solid fabrics because I want to use quilting to highlight the diamond shapes and I thought that this would show up better with plain rather than patterned fabrics.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the Jacobs Ladder Diamond quilt

2.1/2″ squares:  three hundred and fifty six medium blue, four red, two hundred and eighty eight light blue, sixteen dark blue

4.7/8″ squares:  thirty six each in green and light blue, thirty six each in yellow and dark blue

For the border you will need to cut four 6.7/8″ squares in red and in dark blue, together with eight 6.1/2″ red strips cut across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangles using the 4.7/8″ squares in light blue/green and in dark blue/yellow.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 4.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

You’ll also need to make half square triangles with the 6.7/8″ red and dark blue squares for the border.  These will give you 6.1/2″ squares.

Make 4 patch units

Make 4 patch units

Make the four patch units

There are so many four patch units required that I would recommend strip piecing.  Sew 2.1/2″ lengths of light blue/medium blue or medium blue/dark blue together along the length.  Cut at 2.1/2″ intervals.  This will give you rectangles 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″, each containing two squares.  Sew these rectangles together in pairs, rotating them so that the colours are diagonally opposite each other.

You will need four of these units with a red square replacing the medium blue in the top left corner.

Quilt block layout

Quilt block layout

Assemble the Jacobs Ladder quilt block

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.  In the first row there’s a light blue/medium blue at each end and a light blue/green half square triangle in the middle.  The second row is made with a medium blue/light blue four patch unit in the middle, a green/light blue triangle unit n the left and a dark blue/yellow triangle unit on the right.  For the third row you need a medium blue/light blue four patch unit on the left, a yellow/dark blue triangle unit in the middle and a medium blue/dark blue four patch unit on the right.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  Make thirty two of these.

Alternate quilt block layout

Alternate quilt block layout

Assemble the alternate block

I have changed just one square in the alternate block.  The top left square is red instead of medium blue.  You need to make four of this version of the block.

Assemble the Jacobs Ladder Diamond quilt

Rows 1 and 2

Rows 1 and 2

Sew the blocks together in six rows of six.  Rows one and two are exactly the same as each other.  I’ll describe the blocks in terms of the stripe formed by the lines of the triangles.  In the first three blocks these stripes go up from bottom left to top right.  For the second three blocks the stripes go down from top left to bottom right

Rows 3 and 4

Rows 3 and 4

In row three the first two and last two blocks are the same as in the first two rows.  The middle two blocks are the alternate blocks and they are placed so that the red squares are side by side at the bottom of the row.

Row four is where the design starts to form the bottom part of the overall diamond design.  The first two blocks have the stripes going down from top left to bottom right.  These are followed by two alternate blocks with the red squares together at the top of the row.  In the final two blocks the stripes go up from bottom left to top right.

Rows 5 and 6

Rows 5 and 6

Finally rows five and six are the same as each other.  The first three blocks in these rows have the stripes running down from top left to bottom right while the last three blocks have the stripes running up from bottom left to top right.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

The borders are made with two red/dark blue triangles in the middle and lengths of red fabric on either side.  For the top and bottom of the quilt sew 30.1/2″ lengths of red to each side of the triangles.  Sew 36.1/2″ lengths of red to the sides of the triangles for the sides of the quilt.  The half square triangles are made from 6.7/8″ squares and the red fabric strips are 6.1/2″ wide.

That completes the Jacobs Ladder Diamond quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

 

There are no sightseeing photos this week, I’m afraid.  I’ve had real problems with my computer system and most of the week has been spent trying to sort these out.  This morning I’m off to the dentist and this afternoon I shall sit back and relax!
Craftsy

Times Remembered Quilt Pattern

Times remembered quilt

Times remembered quilt

I chose the Times Remembered quilt block for this quilt because that’s what I always find myself doing at the start of a new year – taking a glance back at the previous year.  Whether or not you do the same, I hope that you thoroughly enjoyed your festive break and will have a wonderful new year.

The Star and Cross block is my choice for an alternative.  I’m quite pleased with the way that it forms a circle around the central area of the quilt.  There are sixteen blocks – eight of each – and they are all 15″ square finished size.  Altogether I used 1/2 yard of dark blue, 3/4 yard of medium blue, 1.1/4 yards of light blue, 1.1/2 yards each of red and white fabrics.  The quilt measures 66″ square.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the times remembered quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  forty dark blue, forty eight medium blue, thirty two light blue for the times remembered blocks,  together with forty eight white and sixty four light blue for the star and cross quilt

3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  eight medium blue, eight red for the times block, together with eight white for the star block

3.7/8″ squares:  sixteen each in red and white for the times block, together with thirty two each in light blue and white for the star block

For the border you will need seven 2.1/2″ strips of red cut across the width of fabric.

Making half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

I’ve used 3.7/8″ squares for the half square triangles, in the colour pairings listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.

Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Times remembered quilt block layout

Times remembered quilt block layout

Make the times remembered quilt block

Lay the patchwork pieces out as shown in the photo.  Place a dark blue square in each corner and in the middle.  Add a light blue square on each edge of the central square and a red/white half square triangle in each corner of that central area.  Place these so that the white triangles are on the outside, forming the corners of that area.

For the outer frame you need a medium blue rectangle at the top, a red rectangle at the bottom and three medium blue squares on each side.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  Make eight of them.

Star and cross quilt block layout

Star and cross quilt block layout

Make the star and cross quilt block

Lay the patchwork out as shown.  Form the central cross with a white rectangle in row three and a white square above and below it.  Place a white square in each corner of the block, with a blue/white half square triangle forming a butterfly shape across each corner.

Place a light blue square in the middle of each edge of the block.  Add the remaining light blue squares diagonally inside each white corner square.

Sew the squares together across each row and sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  Make eight of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the times remembered quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  In row one place two star blocks in the middle with a times block at each end of the row.  Place these so that the red rectangles are at the bottom of the blocks.

Row two

Row two

The second row is made with two times blocks in the middle and a star block at each end.  Place the times blocks so that the red rectangle is first on the right and then on the bottom of the blocks.

Row three

Row three

For the third row the blocks are the same as for the second row, but this time the red rectangles are first on the top and then on the left of the blocks.  This is how the cross in the centre of the quilt is formed.

Row four

Row four

Finally the fourth row comprises two star blocks in the middle with a times block at each end.  Rotate the times blocks so that the red rectangles are at the top of the blocks.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

I’ve used 3.1/2″ strips of red for the quilt border.  You’ll need two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 66.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Times Remembered quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Earlswood lakes

Earlswood lakes

I’ve had a very relaxing break.  While my sewing machine was carefully tidied away I took lots of lovely walks.  One in particular to Earlswood Lakes gave me some gorgeous scenes of the sun shining on the water:  sometimes my camera just shows this as a blur, but for some reason this time it showed the sun’s reflection beautifully.  I think that I’ll have to try and use this particular photo as the basis of a quilt.

Holly's vest

Holly’s vest

In addition I wanted to share with you a baby vest that I adapted for my granddaughter, Holly.  It was very simple to make – I added some text to a photo of Christmas fabric and then printed it on plain fabric.  I sewed that and a holly shape on to the vest, giving a festive vest.  It was a really simple way of personalising a gift for her.

Red Hat Quilt – Free Pattern

Red hat quilt

Red hat quilt

This red hat quilt pattern was a request.  The members of the Red Hat Society wear red hats with purple outfits, so I decided to use both red and purple hats in the quilt.  I was asked for a very simple quilt pattern, so I designed the most simple hat quilt block that I could using two shades of colour and then made the blocks in both red and purple.

Each block measures 12″ square finished size and I have used 3/4 yard of dark red with 1 yard each of light red, dark purple and light purple.  The quilt itself is 52″ square.




Cutting requirements for the red hat quilt

6.1/2″ squares:  eight dark purple, eight dark red

2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  eight dark purple, eight dark red

2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles:  eight light purple, eight light red

3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  sixteen light purple, sixteen light red

2″ squares:  sixteen light purple, sixteen light red

3.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ rectangles:  eight light purple, eight light red

For the border you will need five 2.1/2″ strips of dark purple fabric cut across the width of fabric.

Red hat quilt block layout

Red hat quilt block layout

Make the red hat quilt block

Lay the pieces out as shown.  The first row is the 2″ by 12.1/2″ strip.  In the second row the dark purple square is in the middle with a 3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ light purple rectangle on each side.

For the third row you need to place the dark purple strip in the middle with a 2″ light purple square on each side.  Finally the fifth row is the 3.1/2″ by 12.1/2″ light purple rectangle.

Sew the pieces together across the rows

Sew the pieces together across the rows

Sew the pieces together across the rows in the second and third rows.

Then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.  Make eight blocks in purple and eight blocks in red.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Assemble the red hat quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four, alternating the purple and red across the rows and down the columns.

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of dark purple.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom, with two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the red hat quilt.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

Kansas Beauty Star Quilt Pattern

Kansas Beauty star quilt

Kansas Beauty star quilt

The Kansas Beauty Star quilt is based on the Kansas Beauty quilt block, but I have used three different colour variations to form a star design on the quilt.

I have used nine 16″ square finished size blocks.

The quilt measures 52″ square and I have used 1/4 yard of yellow star fabric, 1/2 yard each of light blue and dark blue, 3/4 yard of white and 1.1/2 yards of red fabric.  There are nine 16″ finished size blocks.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.

For those of you who have pointed out that the star looks like a swastiks, I apologise.  I did not see the likeness and I certainly meant no offence.  This is what Wikipedia says about the shape:

It is considered to be a sacred and auspicious symbol in contemporary religious cultures such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism and dates back at least 11,000 years.



Completed Kansas beauty star quilt blocks

Completed Kansas beauty star quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the Kansas beauty star quilt

4.1/2″ squares:  nine white

3.3/8″ squares:  seventy two red, thirty six white

5.1/4″ squares:  nine red, cut along both diagonals to make four triangles

8.7/8″ squares:  four yellow, six light blue, eight dark blue, cut along one diagonal to make two triangles

For the border you will need five 2.1/2″ red strips cut across the width of fabric.

Make diamond in a square blocks

Make diamond in a square blocks

Making the diamond in a square central section

Begin with a 4.1/2″ white square and on each edge of it place a red triangle cut from the 5.1/4″ red squares (cut along both diagonals to make four triangles).  Sew the top and bottom triangles on first, press them open and then add the triangles to the sides of the square.  The progression of making the block starts in the top left photo of the photo and then follows three columns till you get to the diamond in a square in the bottom right of the photo.

Press and trim the middle of each edge where the triangle tips stick out.

Add a frame to this section

Layout of central area

Layout of central area

The next part of the quilt block layout is common to all nine of the blocks – it’s only the outer triangles where I have used the colour variations.

Place the diamond in a square in the middle and surround it with red and white 3.3/8″ squares.  Each edge of this frame is made with one red, one white and then two red squares.  If you begin at the top left and follow the squares round in a clockwise direction, you’ll see that each edge follows the same pattern.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the squares together across the top and bottom rows.  Join the two pairs of squares either side of the diamond in a square together so that you can sew the middle section together in one row.  Now sew the three rows to each other.  You need to make nine of these sections.

Add triangles to the edges

Add triangles to the edges

Final frame of the Kansas beauty quilt block

Cut the 8.7/8″ squares along one diagonal to make two triangles from each square.  Now make further diamond in a square blocks using the red and white central sections for the diamonds.

Follow the same technique as above, adding two triangles at a time.  Press the first two triangles open and then sew the remaining two triangles in place.  You need to make four blocks with the colours as shown – two triangles of dark blue and two of star fabric.

In addition, make one block with only light blue triangles and make four more with two light blue and two dark blue triangles.  See the photo near the top of the page for the layouts.

Row 1

Row 1

Assemble the Kansas beauty star quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  In row one place a star/dark blue block in the middle with a dark blue/light blue block at each end.  Notice that the dark blue triangles are placed so that they form two larger dark blue triangles pointing downwards.  This means that you have light blue triangles in these top corners of the quilt.

Row 2

Row 2

In row two place the single light blue block in the middle with a dark blue/star block on each end.  Place these so that the star fabric triangles are on either side of the central block, with the dark blue triangles on the outer edges.

Row 3

Row 3

Use the remaining three blocks in the third row.  The dark blue/star block in the middle is placed with the star triangles at the top.  The two light blue/dark blue blocks on the edges are placed so that the dark blue triangles form two larger triangles at the bottom, pointing towards the middle row.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Kansas beauty star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Lantern festival horse and carriage

Lantern festival horse and carriage

Last week I told you that I was going to the Magic Lantern Festival in the Botanical Gardens.  We were lucky enough to have a lovely dry and mild night for it.  The lanterns were amazing!  They had fitted so many scenes into a relatively small area.

lantern festival toadstools

lantern festival toadstools

They even had a model of the Birminghm bull, but my photo of that didn’t come out very well, so I’m showing you some magic toadstools instead.

Where did my body go?

Where did my body go?

Then at the weekend, as part of my whirlwind runup to Christmas, my daughter and I went to Edinburgh.  What a beautiful city.  I’ll show you more photos of it after Christmas, but for now I couldn’t resist showing you where I was beheaded in in the Camera Obscura building.  As you will have already guessed, it’s all done with mirrors.

So now it just remains for me to wish you a very Merry Christmas.  I hope that you have a wonderful festive season leading up to a happy, prosperous and healthy new year.  Thank you for letting me share with you throughout this last year.

I won’t be sending out a quilt pattern next Friday – the next one will be Friday 6th January 2017.

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