Roman Pavements Quilt Pattern

Roman pavements quilt

Roman pavements quilt

The Roman Pavements quilt pattern arises of course from my recent visit to Rome.  It is not based on designs that I saw there, but rather on two blocks which both have ‘Roman’ in their name.  I’ve used nine blocks which are 18″ square finished size – the Roman Pavements quilt block and the Roman Stripes and Squares block.  The colours used are those of the Italian flag – red, white and green.

The quilt measures 58″ square and I needed 1/4 yard of light green, 1/2 yard of white, 1 yard each of dark green and red with 1.3/4 yards of medium green.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




 

Cutting requirements for the Roman pavements quilt

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

3.1/2″ squares:  four dark green

3.7/8″ squares:  eight each in dark green and white, four each in medium green and white, four each in light green and white

6.1/2″ squares:  eight white

18.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  sixteen red, thirty two medium green

6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty two red, sixteen green

For the border you will need to cut seven 2.1/2″ strips of dark green across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.

Place a green square right sides together with a white square.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a seam 1/4″ either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the white and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.  These are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Central section of the block

Central section of the block

Make the Roman pavements quilt block

I’m showing this block in sections to make it more easy to check on the correct placement of the triangles.  Place four dark green/white half square triangles in the middle.  Lay them so that the dark green triangles are together, forming a diamond in the middle.

On each edge of this place a pair of light green/white half square triangles.  Lay them so that the light green triangles lie together to form a larger triangle pointing towards the middle.

Place a dark green/white half square triangle in each corner with the dark green on the outside, forming the corners of this section.

Roman pavements quilt block layout

Roman pavements quilt block layout

The next frame contains medium green and dark green.  Lay two medium green/white half square triangles on each edge of the central section with a dark green/white half square triangle on either side of them.  Place a dark green square in each corner.  Lay the medium green triangles so that the white triangles together form a larger white triangle pointing towards the middle.

The dark green square with three dark green triangles together form a shape that looks a bit like an open envelope in each corner.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  It measures 18.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make one only.

Use strip piecing

Use strip piecing

Make the Roman stripes and squares blocks

I’ve adapted this simple block to fit with my ideas for the quilt.  It is much more easy to make if you use strip piecing.  Sew together panels of 2.1/2″ strips of red/green/red and of green/red/green.

Make squares and rectangles

Make squares and rectangles

Cut the red/green/red at 6.1/2″ intervals to make 6.1/2″ squares.

Cut the green/red/green panels at 18.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles 18.1/2″ by 6.1/2″.

Roman stripes and squares layout

Roman stripes and squares layout

Lay these strips out as shown – a green/red/green strip on each side with a central column made using two red/green/red strips and a white square in the middle.

Sew the three squares together down the central column and then sew the three columns to each other.

This block also measures 18.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make eight of them.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the Roman pavements quilt

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.  Rows one and three are the same as each other, made with three stripes and squares blocks.  Place the first and third blocks with the long stripes running vertically.  Lay the second block with the long stripes running horizontally.

Row two

Row two

Make row two with the Roman pavements quilt block in the middle.  Place a stripes and squares block on each side of it, with the long strips running vertically.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Quilt border

Quilt border

Add the quilt border

I’ve used 2.1/2″ strips of dark green fabric for the quilt border.  You’ll need two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 58.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Roman pavements quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

Roman images

Roman images

Last week I promised you photos of my trip to Rome.  I’ve written them up as a separate article.  Click on Rome images to see the article and photos.

Oslo Norwegian Quilt – Free Pattern

Oslo Norwegian quilt

Oslo Norwegian quilt

I made the Oslo Norwegian quilt based on my recent travels.  The block for the central part of the quilt comes from a floor tile design that I saw in Oslo Cathedral.  It measures 76″ square.

Original tile pattern

Original tile pattern

I wanted to brighten up the design and make it fresh and cheerful for the beginning of the New Year so I have surrounded  the central area with diamond frames in blue and red together with lots and lots of white.  It’s a large quilt, but the individual blocks are very easy to make.

I’ve used sixteen blocks which are all 18″ square finished size. In order to make the quilt I needed 1 yard each of dark blue and red, 1.1/2 yards of light blue and 3 yards of white.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.  I’m also holding a sale throughout the next seven days – details at the bottom of the page.




 

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the Oslo Norwegian quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  one hundred and thirty six light blue, twenty four white, seventy two red – these can be made with strip piecing, so don’t cut them till you’ve read the pattern

3.7/8″ squares:  sixteen dark blue, sixteen red, eight light blue, forty white

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  forty white

9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  twenty four white

12.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  twenty four white

For the border you will to cut eight 2.1/2″ dark blue strips across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use all the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a white square with either a dark blue, light blue or red square, right sides together.

Mark a line along one diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the coloured fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Central area of the Oslo quilt block

Central area of the Oslo quilt block

Make the Oslo quilt block

For the central area of this block, you need to place four light blue/white half square triangles together to make a four patch unit.  Place them so that the blue is always in the middle, creating a blue diamond in a white square.

Add the next frame

Add the next frame

Make the frame around this area using light blue squares in the corners with a pair of red/white half square triangles on each edge of the central area.  Place these so that the white triangles form a larger white triangle pointing towards the middle.

Oslo quilt block layout

Oslo quilt block layout

The outer frame of the Oslo block is very simple.  Place a 6.1/2″ white rectangle on either side of a pair of dark blue/white half square triangles.  This is the same in rows one and six, but note that the blue triangles always point away from the middle.

Down the sides place a white square either side of two dark blue/white half square triangles.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the Oslo quilt block.  It now measures 18.1/2″ square and you need to make four of these.

Use strip piecing

Use strip piecing

Make the alternate quilt block

For this block I have used strip piecing for speed.  Sew together a 3.1/2″ strip of light blue and red fabrics to make one panel.  Sew together 3.1/2″ strips of light blue, red, light blue to make the second panel.

Cut these panels at 3.1/2″ intervals to make rectangles consisting of either two or three squares.  These are 3.1/2″ wide by either 6.1/2″ or 9.1/2″ long.

Alternate quilt block layout

Alternate quilt block layout

Lay the sections out for the alternate block in six rows.

The first and sixth rows contain a blue/red strip with a 12.1/2″ white strip.  In the first row place the red/blue on the right.  In the sixth row the blue/red is on the left.  Make sure that the red square is always on the diagonal line.

Lines two and five contain one blue/red/blue strip together with a 9.1/2″ white rectangle.  For lines three and four you need one blue/red/blue strip with a white square on one side and a 6.1/2″ white rectangle on the other side.  It’s easy enough to check your placements by making sure that the red continues down the diagonal.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  This block is also 18.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make twelve of them.

First 2 rows of the Oslo Norwegian quilt

First 2 rows of the Oslo Norwegian quilt

Assemble the Oslo Norwegian quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  Make row one with four alternate blocks.  In the first two blocks the coloured diagonal runs up from bottom left to top right.  For the last two blocks the coloured diagonal runs down from top left to bottom right.

In row two place two Oslo blocks in the middle with an alternate block at each end.  Match the coloured diagonals to the blocks in row one.

Rows three and four

Rows three and four

Rows three and four are similar, but forming the bottom of the diamond frames.  In row three place two Oslo blocks in the middle with an alternate block at each end.  Place the alternate blocks so that the coloured diagonals run from the sides towards the middle.

Make row four with four alternate blocks, matching the coloured diagonals to the block above.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Border in dark blue

Border in dark blue

Add the quilt border

I’ve used 2.1/2″ strips of dark blue fabric for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of 72.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 76.1/2″ for the sides of the quilt.

That completes the Oslo Norwegian quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

As I stated above, I’m holding a New Year sale from Friday 5th January to Thursday 11th January.  I’m offering an 18% discount across the shop on all orders over £5.  There is no coupon code required – the discount will be applied automatically when you check out.  Take a look at the shop here.

I have a favour to ask while you are looking:  I have made some tote bags with slogans on them and I’d really appreciate your comments on them – what you think of colour, font, design or any slogans that you think would look good.  I’d really appreciate your views.

18% DISCOUNT:  CLICK HERE

Floating Diamond Quilt – Free Pattern

Floating diamond quilt

Floating diamond quilt

In the Floating Diamond quilt I have used the sashed four patch quilt block as an alternative.  Both are very easy blocks and I think they go well together.  I rather like all the secondary designs that form within the quilt.

The blocks are 12″ square finished size and I have made eight floating diamond blocks and eight sashed four patch blocks.

The quilt measures 52″ square and I have used 1 yard of lilac fabric, 1.1/4 yards of purple and 1.1/2 yards of green fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




 

Completed quilt blocks

Completed quilt blocks

Cutting requirements for the floating diamond quilt

For the floating diamond quilt blocks:

3.1/2″ squares:  forty eight purple, sixteen lilac

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty two each in lilac and green

For the sashed four patch block:

4.1/2″ squares:  sixteen green, sixteen lilac

2.1/2″ squares:  sixteen green, sixteen lilac

8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty two purple

For the border you will need five 2.1/2″ green strips cut across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a lilac and a green square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.

Floating diamond quilt block layout

Floating diamond quilt block layout

Make the floating diamond quilt block

Lay the patchwork pieces out in four rows of four.

Place a 3.1/2″ purple square in each corner with a lilac/purple four patch unit in the middle.  Fill the remaining spaces with half square triangles.  Lay these so that the green triangles together form larger green triangles pointing away from the middle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block measures 12.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make eight of them.

Sashed 4 patch quilt block layout

Sashed 4 patch quilt block layout

Make the sashed four patch quilt block

This block is even more easy to make!  Once again place a four patch in the middle but this time use lilac and green 4.1/2″ squares.  Use 2.1/2″ squares in the corners.  Place two green corners to follow one diagonal and two lilac corners to follow the other diagonal.

Fill the remaining spaces with purple rectangles.

Partially sewn block

Partially sewn block

Sew the pieces together in the top and bottom rows.  For the middle section you need to sew the four patch unit together first and then you can sew a purple rectangle to each side.

Sew the rows to each other.  At this stage the block also measures 12.1/2″ square and you need to make eight of them.

Row one

Row one

Assemble the floating diamond quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four blocks.  In row one use a floating diamond at each end with two sashed 4 patch blocks in the middle.  Note the directions of the diagonals:  the green squares in the middle two blocks begin in the middle and move towards the side.  In the floating diamond blocks the purple squares begin in the corners and move towards the middle.

Row two

Row two

For row two you need two floating diamond blocks in the middle with a sashed 4 patch block at each end.  The squares in the diagonals continue the lines begun in the first row.

Row three

Row three

Row three also contains two floating diamonds in the middle with a sashed 4 patch at each end.  Now the green diagonals are moving from the sides towards the middle and the purple diagonals are moving from the middle towards the edges.

Row four

Row four

Finally in row four place two sashed four patch blocks in the middle with a floating diamond at each end.  The diagonals continue in the same directions as they did in row three.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

Add the quilt border

For the quilt border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of green fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 48.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 52.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the floating diamond quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Sunrise in Iceland

Sunrise in Iceland

Last week I promised you some of my Icelandic photos.  There were so many to choose from that once again I wrote a separate article.  You can read about my Icelandic trip here.

Quarter Log Cabin Quilt – Free Pattern

Quarter log cabin quilt

Quarter log cabin quilt

The quarter log cabin quilt pattern is just what it says – blocks made in the traditional log cabin style but representing only one quarter of a completed log cabin block.  This allows you far more freedom to rotate the blocks, allowing many new design options.  In this rectangular quilt design I have put the blocks together to make one complete log cabin block with half and three quarter log cabins around it.

The quilt measures 52″ by 68″, using 3/4 yard each of dark blue and medium blue, together with 1 yard of light blue and 1.1/4 yards of white fabric.  I have used thirty six blocks which are 8″ square finished size.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




 

Cutting requirements for the quarter log cabin quilt

2.1/2″ squares:  thirty six dark blue, thirty six medium blue

4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six medium blue, thirty six light blue

6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six light blue, thirty six white

8.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  thirty six white

For the borders you will need to cut 2.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric:  three each in medium blue, light blue and white.  You will need to cut seven strips in dark blue.

Sew together two strips

Sew together two strips

Make the quarter log cabin quilt block

The first part of the block can best be made using strip sewing.  Sew together a strip of dark blue and one of medium blue.  Cut these strips at 2.1/2″ intervals. This gives you rectangles 4.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ which are basically a square each of the two blues.

Add a strip on the left

Add a strip on the left

Lay down one of these rectangles with the dark blue square at the bottom.  Sew a 4.1/2″ medium blue square to the left hand side.  This forms the first frame around the dark blue.

As you can see, the dark blue square is only framed on two sides, whereas in a full log cabin block it would have a medium blue frame on all four sides.

Add the light blue frame

Add the light blue frame

Now add a 4.1/2″ light blue strip to the top.  Sew a 6.1/2″ light blue strip to the left hand side.

Add the final frame

Add the final frame

For the final frame I have used white patterned fabric.  Sew a 6.1/2″ white strip to the top.  Add an 8.1/2″ strip to the left hand side.

That completes the quarter log cabin quilt block.  It measures 8.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make thirty six of them.

Assemble the quarter log cabin quilt – first three rows

First three rows

First three rows

Sew the blocks together in six rows of six.  I’m showing the rows three at a time for the sake of clarity.

I find it most simple to concentrate on the dark blue squares so that I can see which way to rotate the blocks.

Row one contains three pairs of blocks – with the dark blue at the bottom right and bottom left.  This way the dark blue squares form three rectangles.

In row two place the dark blue squares top right, bottom right twice, bottom left twice and then top left.  At each side you can now see the corner frame formed with three dark blue squares.

For the third row place the dark blue bottom right three times and then bottom left for the remaining three blocks.

Rows four, five, six

Rows four, five, six

Remaining three rows

In the second three rows the design is similar but the other way up.

For row four place the dark blue squares top right three times and then top left three times.

In row five place the dark blue bottom right, top right twice, top left twice and then finally bottom left.

Lay the blocks in row six in three pairs – one top right and one top left within each pairing.

Sew the blocks together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the main section of the quilt top.

Borders for top and bottom

Borders for top and bottom

Add the quilt borders

I’ve used all the colours in the borders and have made the quilt rectangular by using bigger borders for the top and the bottom.

Both panels are made using dark blue, medium blue, light blue and white fabrics followed by an additional dark blue strip.  For each one the colours fade from dark blue to white away from the quilt.  This means placing the panels with white near the top on the first panel and near the bottom on the second panel.

Make two panels 48.1/2″ long and sew one to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.

Add the side borders

Add the side borders

Finally add a 68.1/2″ dark blue strip to each side of the quilt.

That completes the quarter log cabin quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Palace in Oslo

Palace in Oslo

Last week I promised you some details of my trip to Oslo.  There were too many to tack on to this pattern so I have written a complete article with lots of photos.  You can see it in Visiting Oslo.

Disappearing Five Patch Quilt Pattern

Disappearing five patch quilt

Disappearing five patch quilt

This disappearing five patch quilt is my take on the better known disappearing nine or four patch quilts.  I don’t think that I’ve seen one using a five patch block and I’m quite pleased with the way it has turned out.  The quilt measures about 47″ square and I’ve used 1/2 yard each of dark blue, light blue and white with 3/4 yard of red fabric.

I’ve used nine very simple five patch blocks which are all 15″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the disappearing five patch quilt

3.1/2″ squares:  seventy two dark blue, seventy two white, seventy two light blue, nine red

For the border you will need to cut five 3.1/2″ red strips across the width of fabric.




Five patch block layout

Five patch block layout

Make the five patch block

Lay the squares out in five rows of five.  Place a red square in the middle.  Add a dark blue square in each corner and on each edge of the red square.  Place light blue squares to form a diamond shape around the dark blue/red area.  Lay two white squares in the remaining spaces on each edge.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  The block measures 15.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make nine of them.

Blocks cut along the middle lines

Blocks cut along the middle lines

Cut the blocks

Originally I had planned to cut the blocks along the horizontal and vertical, but the resulting blocks weren’t terribly interesting.

Cut the blocks along both diagonals

Cut the blocks along both diagonals

Instead I decided to cut each block along both diagonal lines to make four triangles from each block.  This gives a much more interesting block to work with.

Cut all the blocks along the diagonals so that you have thirty six triangles to work with.

Place 3 triangles side by side

Place 3 triangles side by side

Lay out the first row

I have used twelve triangles in each row, so there will be three rows altogether.

Begin by placing three triangles side by side with the red triangles at the bottom.

Add triangles beneath and at the ends

Add triangles beneath and at the ends

Now add two triangles beneath them with the red triangles at the top.  In addition, place one triangle at each end with the red triangles pointing towards the middle of the quilt.

Add two more triangles

Add two more triangles

For the next section add two more triangles with the red triangles pointing downwards.  You’ll see that these form squares with the triangles above them.

Complete layout for one row

Complete layout for one row

Finally lay three more triangles across the bottom with the red triangles pointing upwards.  This is the full layout for one row of the disappearing five patch quilt.

Begin sewing the triangles together

Begin sewing the triangles together

Sew the triangles together

The method of sewing these triangles together is not as complicated as it might look at first sight.  Begin by sewing together two triangles to form the bottom left corner.  Also sew together two triangles to form the top right corner of the row.  In the middle, sew together two pairs of triangles to make two diamonds (squares on point).

Sew triangles to the diamonds

Sew triangles to the diamonds

Now sew one triangle to the top left and bottom right of each of the diamonds.

Suddenly you just have four sections to sew together in easy straight lines!

The rectangle now measures approximately 41.1/2″ by 14″.  The reason that I say approximately is because on each triangle there are two edges which are cut on the bias (diagonal) so there is more give in those edges and your row might end up slightly larger or smaller than mine did.

Trim the seam allowances

Trim the seam allowances

The important thing is to match up the small red triangles when you are sewing the big triangles together.

You need to trim the seam allowances where they stick out to reduce bulk in the quilt.

Make three rows and sew them to each other.

Red for the border

Red for the border

Add the border

I’ve used 3.1/2″ strips of red for the border.  You’ll need two lengths of about 41″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of about 47″ for the sides – do measure the sides of your quilt before cutting the border strips.

That completes the disappearing five patch quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Barbarians vs New Zealand

Barbarians vs New Zealand

Last week I mentioned that I was going to Twickenham – what an amazing day that was.  If you live outside the UK, you may not know that Twickenham is considered to be the home of English rugby and the stadium has a very special feel to it.

The flags of the Barbarians and of New Zealand were held aloft during the National Anthems.  I did take a video of this part of the proceedings but haven’t been able to work out how to transfer it from my phone to here.

Planes flying over the stadium

Planes flying over the stadium

Twickenham is on the flight path to Heathrow Airport and there were planes over flying us throughout the match – it made me realise just how busy an airport it is.

Try celebrations

Try celebrations

Every time a try was scored we were treated to this fiery display – and there were lots of tries!

Rainbow Medallion Quilt Pattern

Rainbow medallion quilt

Rainbow medallion quilt

The Rainbow Medallion quilt is a big, bright and cheerful rectangular quilt suitable for a double or queen sized bed.  I have used all the colours of the rainbow – Richard Of York Gained Battles In Vain.  I’ve begun with red in the middle, working out to violet on the outside.  The width of the strips also increases from 3″ finished size in the middle to 6″ strips for the violet fabric.

It measures 72″ by 82″ and I have used 1/4 yard each of orange and yellow fabrics, 1/2 yard each of red and green, 3/4 yard of blue, 1 yard of indigo, 1.1/4 yards of violet and 1.3/4 yards of white fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the rainbow medallion quilt

Red:  one 3.1/2″ square, eighteen 4.1/2″ squares

Orange rectangles:  two 3.1/2″ by 5.1/2″, two 3.1/2″ by 11.1/2″

Yellow rectangles:  two 4.1/2″ by 13.1/2″, two 4.1/2″ by 21.1/2″

Green rectangles:  two 4.1/2″ by 23.1/2″, two 4.1/2″ by 31.1/2″

Blue rectangles:  two 5.1/2″ by 33.1/2″, two 5.1/2″ by 43.1/2″

Indigo:  two 5.1/2″ by 45.1/2″, two 5.1/2″ by 55.1/2″

Violet:  two 6.1/2″ by 57.1/2″, two 6.1/2″ by 69.1/2″

White:  cut twenty three 1.1/2″ strips across the width of fabric, eight 2″ strips across the width of fabric, eighteen 4.1/2″ squares

Central area of the rainbow medallion quilt

Central area of the rainbow medallion quilt

Begin in the middle

Place the 3.1/2″ red square in the middle and sew 1.1/2″ white strips around it:  3.1/2″ above and below the square with 5.1/2″ strips down the sides.

Add the orange frame

Add the orange frame

Next add the orange frame.  Sew the 5.1/2″ rectangles to the top and bottom with the 11.1/2″ rectangles going down the sides.

Add a white frame using 11.1/2″ strips above and below the orange and 13.1/2″ strips down the sides.

Next add the yellow

Next add the yellow

For the yellow frame I have increased the width of strips to 4.1/2″.  Two lengths of 13.1/2″ for the top and bottom, two lengths of 21.1/2″ for the sides.  The white strips are 21.1/2″ and 23.1/2″ long.

The green frame

The green frame

Green comes next – I found a lovely William Morris print for this.  The width of rectangles has remained at 4.1/2″:  two lengths of 23.1/2″ and two lengths of 31.1/2″.   The white strips outside the green are 31.1/2″ and 33.1/2″ long.

Light blue for the next frame

Light blue for the next frame

Outer frames of the rainbow medallion quilt

Blue for battles – I have used a pretty light blue for this frame.  The width of the strips increases to 5.1/2″ for this frame.  You’ll need two lengths of 33.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 43.1/2″ for the sides.

The white strips are 43.1/2″ and 45.1/2″ long.

Indigo frame

Indigo frame

Indigo covers quite a wide range of colours, but I have a colour from the same range as the light blue which I think looks like indigo.  The strips widths remain at 5.1/2″ and you need two lengths of 45.1/2″ and two lengths of 55.1/2″.  For the white strips you need two lengths of 55.1/2″ and two lengths of 57.1/2″.

Violet frame

Violet frame

Violet is the last colour of the rainbow.  I have increased the strip width to 6.1/2″ for this frame.  You’ll need two lengths of 57.1/2″ and two lengths of 69.1/2″ in violet.

For the white frame outside the violet I have increased the size slightly to 2″ strips.  You need two lengths of  69.1/2″ and two lengths of 72.1/2″.

I increased the white strip width because I wanted to add 4″  squares along the top and bottom of the quilt.  In order to do this I wanted to make the overall width 72.1/2″.  Then a strip of eighteen squares would fit exactly across the width.  I toyed with the idea of sewing strips of squares all round the quilt, but decided to add them on the top and bottom only so that my quilt would become rectangular rather than square.

Sew red and white strips together

Sew red and white strips together

Add the border

I used strip piecing to make the red and white squares.  Sew together 4.1/2″ strips of red and white and then cut this panel at 4.1/2″ intervals.  This gives you rectangles 8.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ containing one red square and one white square.

Add the border

Add the border

Sew these together side by side to make strips of alternating red and white squares.  You need to make two lengths of eighteen squares (nine pairs of squares).  Sew one strip to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.

Finally add a 1.1/2″ white strip at the top and one to the bottom.  That completes the rainbow medallion quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Holly's dragon

Holly’s dragon

I’m afraid that I’ve been working all week and haven’t got any travels to show you, so instead I thought I’d show you the dragon that I made for my grand daughter’s birthday.  It’s far too big for her, but I hope she’ll like it one day!

I made him from a kit that I bought at the Festival of Quilts and I think he’s gorgeous.

Flamingo Quilt Pattern – Tropicana Fabrics

Flamingo quilt

Flamingo quilt

For the Flamingo quilt pattern I have used fabrics from a lovely new range called Tropicana by Fabric Freedom.  I have based the block on the golden gate quilt block, using twelve 18″ blocks sewn together in four rows of three.

The rectangular quilt measures 62″ by 80″.  I have used 1 yard of pink fabric, 1.1/2 yards of green, 1/2 yard of the flamingo fabric, 3/4 yard of the tropical leaves fabric, with 1 yard of the large leaves and 1.1/4 yards of the small leaves fabric.

All these fabrics are available at a 10″ discount in this week’s special offer, but in addition I am holding a 12% sale this week (details below) to celebrate the new look to my shop.




Completed quilt block

Completed quilt block

Cutting requirements for the flamingo quilt

6.7/8″ squares:  twenty four pink, twenty four large leaves fabric

6.1/2″ squares:  twelve flamingo

6,1.2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  ninety six small leaves, forty eight green – cut sixteen and eight strips across the width of fabric for these

For the borders you will need fifteen 1.1/2″ green strips and eight 2.1/2″ tropical leaves strips, all cut across the width of fabric.

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangles

Use the 6.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a pink and a large leaves square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Mark a seam along one diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  These are now 6.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the pink triangle and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the stripey blocks

Make the stripey blocks

Make the stripey blocks

Sew together 2.1/2″ strips of green and small leaves fabric for this block.  Use a light fabric on either side with a dark fabric in the middle.

Cut these panels at 6.1/2″ intervals to make 6.1/2″ squares.  You need four of these for each block – forty eight in total.

Flamingo quilt block layout

Flamingo quilt block layout

Make the flamingo quilt block

The block itself is very easy to make – a simple nine patch block.

Place a flamingo block in the middle with a stripey block on each edge of the central square.  Place these so that in two of them the stripes are horizontal while in the other two they are vertical.  This way they form a frame around the central square.

Place a half square triangle unit in each corner of the block, always with the pink on the outside forming the corners of the block.  The pink was chosen to tie in with the flamingoes and has the lovely name of Hot Pink!

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows together.  The blocks measure 18.1/2″ square at this stage and you need to make twelve of them.

Assemble the flamingo quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of three.  The blocks are symmetrical so it doesn’t matter which way you sew them unless like me you are using a directional fabric.  I made sure that I kept the flamingoes standing the right way up when I sewed the blocks together.

Three quilt borders

Three quilt borders

Add the quilt borders

I had intended to use one border only.  However I decided that the quilt deserved more of a frame so I ended up with three borders.

I made the first border using 1.1/2″ strips of green:  two lengths of 54.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 74.1/2″ for the sides.

For the second border I used 2.1/2″ strips of a new fabric called Tropical Leaves.  I needed two lengths of 56.1/2″ for top and bottom with two lengths of 78.1/2″ for the sides.

Finally for the third border I returned to the 1.1/2″ strips of green – two lengths of 60.1/2″ for the top and bottom with two lengths of 80.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Flamingo quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Stepping stones

Stepping stones

I was asked for an image of the stepping stones in my garden so here it is.  Apologies for the shadow of the friend with his spade who helped me – I didn’t notice it till this morning.

They mean that I should be able to walk to my workshop in the winter without my feet sinking in to soggy grass.

New shop design

Now the big news this week is that I have a new home page on my shop.  It was suggested to me by the people who run the shopping cart side of things.  It was terribly stressful when they began work because they were emphasising what I thought were all the wrong things and using photos from the internet rather than my own photos.  Luckily we managed to agree things eventually and I am thrilled with the results – much more professional looking than it used to be.

In order to celebrate the new look  I am holding an autumn sale – 12% off all purchases over £5 throughout the shop.  No coupon code needed – the discount will be applied automatically at the checkout.  You can browse the shop here.

Broken Star Quilt – Free Pattern

Broken star quilt

Broken star quilt

I’ve used the Broken Star quilt block together with trumpet cornerstones to make this pretty quilt.  It measures 42″ square and I’ve used 1.1/4 yards of white fabric, 1 yard each of yellow and brown together with 1/2 yard of orange.

I’ve used flying geese units within the block – don’t be worried if you haven’t made these before.  They really are very simple to make.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s special offer.




Cutting requirements for the broken star quilt

6.7/8″ by 3.7/8″ rectangles:  four white, eight yellow, eight brown

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  four white

3.7/8″ squares:  thirty two white, eight orange

6.1/2″ squares:  five white

3.1/2″ squares:  four white

For the borders you will need four 3.1/2″ strips each of orange, yellow and brown together with sixteen 5″ squares each in brown and yellow.

Making flying geese units

Making flying geese units

Make the flying geese units

There are many ways of making flying geese units, but I have chosen the most straightforward way this time.  Place a 6.7/8″ by 3.7/8″ rectangle with right sides up.  Lay a 3.7/8″ square right sides together on one side of the rectangle.  Mark a line along the diagonal of the square and sew along the line.

Cut the fabric 1/4″ away from the seam (in the photo this step is middle left).  Discard the two triangles that you have cut off (brown and orange) and press the remaining part of the square open.

Completed flying geese units

Completed flying geese units

Place another square right sides together on the other side of the rectangle.  Repeat the above step, drawing a line along the diagonal, trimming off excess fabric and pressing the triangle open.  There is a different method of making flying geese here.

Trim the flying geese units

Trim the flying geese units

You need to make eight flying geese units in yellow and white, four in brown and orange, four in white and orange.  Trim them to 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″, making sure to trim from all four edges.

Broken star quilt block top section

Broken star quilt block top section

Make the broken star quilt block

The top and bottom sections of this block are the same as each other.  These sections consist of two rows.  Make the first row with a 6.1/2″ white square at each end, then a yellow/white flying geese unit.  In the centre place a 6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangle with an orange/white flying geese unit beneath it.  For the second row place a yellow/white flying geese unit at each end, then a 3.1/2″ white square with a brown/orange flying geese in the middle.  Check the photo to make sure that you have the flying geese units correctly placed.

Sew the white rectangle and orange/white flying geese together first and then sew the patchwork pieces together across the rows.  Sew the two rows to each other.  Make two of these sections – one for the top of the block and the other to be placed upside down for the bottom section.

Middle row

Middle row

To make the middle row place a 6.1/2″ white square at each end and in the middle.  On either side of the central square place a brown/orange and a white/orange flying geese unit.

Sew the pieces together across the row.

Broken star quilt block layout

Broken star quilt block layout

Here you can see the full layout of the broken star quilt block when the three sections of the block have been sewn together.  Now you just need to sew the three sections to each other.

Top border

Top border

Add the quilt border

Sew together 3.1/2″ strips of brown, yellow and orange.  Make four of these and cut them to give strips 24.1/2″ long by 9.1/2″ wide.

Sew one to the top of the broken star block and one to the bottom.

Make the trumpet units

For the cornerstones I am indebted to Jennie Rayment.  She’s a star and if you ever have the chance to take one of her workshops then do grab the opportunity.  She always provides lots of information and lots of laughs.

Fold the square twice

Fold the square twice

I am using four trumpets for each corner unit.  Fold a yellow 5″ square along one diagonal with right sides together.  Then fold the resulting triangle in half to make a smaller triangle.  This has all the raw edges along one side, a fold on the second side and two folded layers on the third side.  This last is the open edge.

Sew the triangle between two squares

Sew the triangle between two squares

Place a yellow triangle along one edge of a brown 5″ square.  The side of the triangle with all raw edges lies along the edge of the square.

Place a second brown square right sides together on top of the first square.  Sew the edge that encloses the triangle to join the two squares with the yellow triangle appearing now between the two squares.

Press the triangle flat to make a pouch. and press.  Make eight of these units.

Lay two units to make a four patch

Lay two units to make a four patch

Complete the corner units

Lay two of the units with the open edges of the yellow triangles furthest from the middle.  Place two more yellow triangles to lie along the top of the bottom unit, meeting in the middle.  Make sure that the open edges of the triangles are at the ends away from the middle.

Completed corner unit

Completed corner unit

Flip the top unit down right sides together with the bottom unit and sew the two units together.

Flatten the triangles and press.

Sew the corner units in place

Sew the corner units in place

Sew one corner unit to each end of the two remaining border strips.  Add one strip to each side of the quilt.

Secure the trumpets

Secure the trumpets

There are several ways of securing the trumpets in place.  I have chosen to add a few stitches to either side of each trumpet just at the corners where my finger is pointing in the photo.

That completes the broken star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Flower display

Flower display

Last week I visited the Malvern Autumn Show.  The flowers on display were absolutely beautiful.  I was fired with enthusiasm and bought loads of spring bulbs although I could never hope to arrange my flowers as beautifully as the displays at the show.

Superb vegetables

Superb vegetables

They also had a section of giant vegetables which was fun to see.  These leeks must have been several feet long.

Giant marrows

Giant marrows

Although this isn’t a brilliant photo I thought that it would give you an idea of the size of these vegetables when seen beside people.

I had a problem on my way home which made it into a long day.  Birmingham was holding its first 100 mile bike race, Velo Birmingham.  It was a tremendous success (well done Birmingham!) but there were lots and lots of road closures.  My area seemed to be shut off completely and it took me ages to find a way home.

Moreton Hall Quilt Pattern – Stained Glass

Moreton Hall quilt

Moreton Hall quilt

The Moreton Hall quilt pattern is based on the outer walls of Little Moreton Hall.  When I showed you a photo after I had visited the hall, several quilters commented on what a lovely quilt it would make – and they were absolutely right!

Little Moreton Hall

Little Moreton Hall

I began with the stark black and white design that is common to Tudor buildings but then decided that I wanted some colour.  The addition of red and blue changed the look of the quilt completely.  Suddenly it began to look like a stained glass window.  I’m thrilled with it!




The quilt is rectangular, measuring about 47″ by 56″, using sixteen blocks which are also rectangular.  I have used 1/2 yard of blue fabric, 3/4 yard of white, 1 yard of red and 1.1/2 yards of black fabric.  You can buy these fabrics at a discount in this week’s Moreton Hall quilt kit.  Several people told me that they had trouble with the checkout process when they were buying fabric.  Thanks for alerting me to this – it has now been fixed and you should be able to use the Secure Checkout tab without any problems.

Completed blocks

Completed blocks

Cutting requirements for the Moreton Hall quilt

Black fabric:  thirty two rectangles 1.7/8″ by 12.1/2″, thirty two rectangles 1.7/8″ by 6.7/8″.  For the sashing and borders you will need twelve rectangles 2″ by 10.1/2″ as well as eleven 2″ strips cut across the width of fabric.

Red fabric:  sixteen rectangles 1.7/8″ by 9.3/4″, eight 2.7/8″ squares.  For the border you will need five 3.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric.

Blue fabric:  sixteen rectangles 1.7/8″ by 9.3/4″, eight 2.7/8″ squares.

White fabric:  sixteen rectangles 1.7/8″ by 13.7/8″.

Shaping the rectangles

Shaping the rectangles

Make the first half of the block

Cut the red and blue squares along one diagonal to make two triangles.  Each block contains a triangle in two corners and the rest of the block comprises stripes of varying size and colour.

To make the stripes in red, blue and black, fold down the top corner on each end of the rectangles so that it touches the bottom edge.  This forms a fold running from the bottom corner of the rectangle to the top edge.  Cut along the fold.

I would recommend that you don’t cut the white rectangles until you are ready to place them – the cuts are different for the white and I felt that it was safer to cut them when I could see which direction the edges need to point.

Begin in the bottom left corner

Begin in the bottom left corner

Begin with a blue triangle in the bottom left corner of the block.  Add a black stripe cut from a 6.7/8″ rectangle.  Now add a blue stripe cut from a 9.3/4″ rectangle.

I’ve shown the blue triangles that I have cut off to help you see where the cuts were made.

Continue with a black stripe cut from a 12.1/2″ rectangle.

Add the white stripe

Cut the white rectangle

Cut the white rectangle

Now comes the white stripe.  Follow the photo and fold down the top right corner of the rectangle.  Fold up the bottom left corner of the rectangle.  Cut along the folds.

Place the white stripe

Place the white stripe

Now lay the white stripe in place.  The black stripe above it is from another 12.1/2″ rectangle.  Notice that the stripes below the white were all placed like a bowl with the shorter edge at the bottom.  Place the black stripe above the white with the shorter edge at the top, like a mountain.

Look along the left hand edge and you’ll see a (more or less) straight line which will be the left hand edge of the block.  From the black stripe above the white the edge starts to run across the top of the block.

Complete layout

Complete layout

Continue adding stripes – a red stripe from a 9.3/4″ rectangle followed by a black stripe from a 6.7/8″ rectangle.  The red triangle completes the layout for this block.

Sew the stripes together, beginning with the blue triangle and adding stripes.

The blue overlaps the black

The blue overlaps the black

The triangle overlaps the black rectangle.  This means that when you press the triangle open you will get a straight line across the seam.  The same applies on each seam.

Press the block and trim the seams to remove all the ends of triangles sticking out.  I had intended the blocks to be 8.1/2″ by 10.1/2″ but mine ended up measuring 8″ by 10″.  The important thing is to keep all the blocks the same size as each other.  You need to make eight of them.

Make the second block

Make the second block

Make the second block

Not being the brightest button in the box, I had planned on rotating the blocks to form the design – until I remembered that the blocks were rectangular.  So the second block is almost exactly the same as the first, but the stripes move in a different direction.  I’ve shown the two blocks next to each other so that you can see how similar they are.

I built up the second block (on the left) from the bottom right corner, rather than the bottom left.  Follow the triangle with the same stripes in the same order.  Just pay special attention to the white stripe.  If you cut this stripe so that the edges are horizontal rather than vertical you will end up with another block the same as the first.  I know because that’s what I did!  My seam ripper worked hard while I made this quilt.  You need to fold the bottom right corner up and the top left corner down.  Apart from that the block is identical to the first.  Make eight of these as well.

Rows one and three

Rows one and three

Assemble the Moreton Hall quilt

Sew the blocks together in four rows of four.  Rows one and three are the same as each other.  Alternate the blocks across the row so that they form the top half of two red diamonds.

Lay three sashing strips between the blocks so that you have sashing between all of the blocks but not at the ends of the rows.

Rows two and four

Rows two and four

Rows two and four are the same as each other.  Lay the blocks so that they form the bottom half of two red diamonds.  Again, place three sashing strips between the blocks of each row.

Sew the blocks and sashing together across each row.

Add sashing between the rows

Add sashing between the rows

Join the rows with sashing

Cut five 2″ black strips to use as sashing between the rows.  These will be about 36.1/2″ long.  Sew one strip to the top of the first row, then one between all the rows and one at the bottom of the quilt.

Add sashing to the sides

Add sashing to the sides

In order to enclose the design fully, sew a 2″ black strip to each side of the quilt.  These will be about 47.1/2″ long.

Add the Moreton Hall quilt borders

I wanted a strong frame for the quilt, so I added two more borders.  For the first of these I used 3.1/2″ strips of red:  two lengths of 39.1/2 for the top and bottom and two lengths of 53.1/2″ for the sides.

For the final border I returned to the 2″ black strips:  two lengths of 45.1/2″ for the top and bottom and two lengths of 56.1/2″ for the sides.  These measurements for the borders are all approximate.

That completes the Moreton Hall quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Llandrindodd Wells

Llandrindodd Wells

My travels this week took me to Wales.  I visited several lovely areas but for this week I’ll just mention Llandrindodd Wells.  I hadn’t realised that this used to be a spa town – although the name of the town should have given me a clue!  On my way to see the old Victorian bath house I came across a gorgeous small forest all set up with walking trails.  Beside one particularly pretty section with a waterfall these four chairs (the four Kings) had been set up.  They were designed by a local artist and they were a real pleasure to see – so fitting for their surroundings.

Christmas Star Quilt – Free Pattern

Christmas Star quilt

Christmas Star quilt

The Christmas Star quilt is bright and cheerful and will definitely put you in the festive mood!  It’s small enough to be relatively quick to make but large enough to be useful as a throw, lap quilt or even on the festive table.

I’ve used 1.1/4 yards each of white and red, 1/2 yard each of batik green and metallic green with 1/4 yard of brown fabric.  The quilt measures 46″ square, using nine 12″ squares finished size with a Christmas tree border.

You can buy these fabrics at a discount by clicking on Christmas Star quilt kit.




Completed Christmas star quilt block

Completed Christmas star quilt block

Cutting requirements for the Christmas Star quilt

4.1/2″ squares:  nine white, four metallic green

4.7/8″ squares:  eighteen each in red and batik green, eighteen each in red and white

2.7/8″ squares:  thirty six each in metallic green and white

1.1/2″ strips cut across the width of fabric:  four white and two brown, eight red

2″ strips cut across the width of fabric:  four white

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a red square eight sides together with either a green or a white square and mark a line along the diagonal.

Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This gives you two half square triangles which are now 4.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the red and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Christmas star quilt block layout

Christmas star quilt block layout

Make the Christmas star quilt block

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.  Place a 4.1/2″ white square in the middle with a red/white half square triangle on each edge of the central square.  Lay a red/green half square triangle in each corner with the green on the outside, forming the corner of the block.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.  This measures 12.1/2″ square at the moment and you need to make nine of these.

Sew the blocks together in three rows of three.

Make the base of the tree

Make the base of the tree

Make the Christmas tree border

For this border I have changed to a different green – this one has a gold sheen to it, more like a decorated tree I thought.

For the trunk of the tree you need a brown square with a white strip on either side of it.  The simplest way to make this is by strip piecing.  Sew together a 1.1/2″ brown strip with a 2″ white strip on either side of it.  Cut this panel at 1.1/2″ intervals.  This creates rectangles 1.1/2″ by 4.1/2″ for the base of the tree.

Christmas tree layout

Christmas tree layout

Make half square triangles with the 2.7/8″ white and metallic green squares.

Place two half square triangles side by side with the green triangles forming a larger green triangle.  Lay the rectangle for the trunk beneath them.

Sew the half square triangles together and then sew them to the rectangle.  This creates a rectangle 4.1/2″ wide by 3.1/2″ high.  I was going to add a 1.1/2″ red strip across the top at this stage but then I realised that it would be far quicker to add a red strip after the tree blocks have been sewn together.

Sew the trees in strips of nine

Sew the trees in strips of nine

You need to make thirty six of the tree blocks and sew them together in four rows of nine trees each.

Add the first border

Add the first border

Complete the first border

Cut four 1.1/2″ red strips 36.1/2″ long and sew one to the top of each strip of trees.  Much easier doing it this way, isn’t it!

Sew one strip to the top and one to the bottom of the quilt.  Remember to place them so that the tree trunk is nearest the quilt.

Add the side borders

Add the side borders

Sew a 4.1/2″ metallic green square to each end of the two remaining strips of trees.  Sew one strip to each side of the quilt.

Add the final border

Add the final border

The final border

As a final border I have used more 1.1/2″ strips of red fabric.  You’ll need two lengths of 44.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt, with two lengths of 46.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the Christmas Star quilt top.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the quilting for beginners section.

Here’s the video:

Osborne House

Osborne House

A few weeks ago I had a wonderful few days in the Isle of Wight.  If you live outside the UK, this is an island off the south coast of England.  I took loads of photos and had great fun deciding which ones to show you.

Formal gardens

Formal gardens

In the end I decided that you would be most interested in Osborne House.  It was built for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert in the 19th century and apparently they spent a lot of time there.  I can certainly see why!

Osborne House interior

Osborne House interior

The gardens and parkland were gorgeous – and the interior was exquisite.  Some of the rooms were completely breathtaking.  Funnily enough, they didn’t feel formal – I felt that I could imagine Victoria there with her children and grand children running round the place.

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