Darting Birds Quilt Block Pattern

Darting Birds quilt block

Darting Birds quilt block

The Darting Birds quilt block pattern is amazingly simple but makes a lovely quilt.  It just goes to show that quilt blocks don’t have to be complicated to be pretty.  I’ve made it here as a 9″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the darting birds quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  one light green, two white

3.7/8″ squares:  one light green, two dark green, three white




Make the half square triangle units

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a white square right sides together with either a light green or a dark green square.  Mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This produces two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the green fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Make the darting birds quilt block

Darting birds quilt block layout

Darting birds quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in three rows of three.  Place a light green/white half square triangle in the top left position with a light green square in the top right and a dark green/white half square triangle between them.

Make the second row with a dark green/white half square triangle at each end and a white square in the middle.

For the third row you’ll need a white square followed by a dark green/white half square triangle and then a light green/white half square triangle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the darting birds quilt block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Darting Birds quilt suggestions

As a basic design, I have shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four blocks.  The block design does get rather lost in this design.

Alternate quilt design

Alternate quilt design

For an alternative design, I’ve added an alternate block of a diamond in a square.  This block could be made with half square triangles made from 4.7/8″ squares.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Beltane May Day Quilt Block Pattern

Beltane May Day quilt block

Beltane May Day quilt block

I designed the Beltane May Day quilt block as a celebration of today being the first day of May.  It’s got heaps of symbolism – or you could just regard it as a colourful scrappy quilt block!

I have made it as an 18″ square finished size using lots of different colours.

Cutting requirements for the Beltane May Day quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  seven white, four green, two purple, two lilac, one yellow

3.7/8″ squares:  three each in red and white, three each in blue and white, one each in blue and yellow, two each in purple and green, two each in lilac and green




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in all the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ square.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Please note that you will end up with one blue/white and one blue/yellow half square triangle surplus to requirements.  This is because the units are made in pairs but only an odd number of units is required of these two colour combinations.

Central area of the block

Central area of the block

Make the Beltane May Day quilt block

The central area of the block is floral, to represent summer flowers – you can tell I’ve been working in my garden over the weekend!

Place a four patch unit of purple and lilac in the middle.  Add a purple and a lilac half square triangle on each edge of the central four patch.  Lay them so that the green triangles together form larger green triangles pointing towards the middle.  Place a green square in each corner.

Full layout of the Beltane May Day quilt block

Full layout of the Beltane May Day quilt block

Now add the frame around this central area.  Across the top of the block lay five blue/white and one blue/yellow half square triangles.  Place these so that the blue triangles together form larger blue triangles pointing downwards.

The blue and white represent the sky and clouds while the yellow represents the sun.

Down the right hand side of the block lay one yellow and three white squares.

Across the bottom row place six red/white half square triangle units.  Lay them in pairs so that the red triangles together form larger red triangles pointing upwards.  These represent the fire used in the Beltane Fire Festival.  Finally lay four white squares up the left hand side of the Beltane May Day quilt block.

Sew the patchwork pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Quilt design suggestions

The basic quilt I’ve shown here uses nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.

Alternate design using rotations

Alternate design using rotations

As an alternative I rotated every other block and I was quite pleased with the way zig zag lines of red triangles began to form.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Old Fashioned Quilt Block Pattern

Old Fashioned quilt block

Old Fashioned quilt block

The Old Fashioned Quilt Block may seem an odd title as you could be forgiven for thinking that most quilt blocks are old fashioned, but that really is its name.  It’s a five patch block and I have made it here as a 14″ square finished size.  The block has a lovely flowery feel to it.

Cutting requirements for the old fashioned quilt block

2.7/8″ squares:  four each in red and white, four each in blue and white

2.1/2″ squares:  eight red, nine blue, four white

6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  four white




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use the 2.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles in the colour combinations listed above.  Place a white square right sides together with either a red or a blue square.  Mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This produces two half square triangle units which are now 2.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the red or blue and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Layout for one corner

Layout for one corner

Make a corner of the block

Make the four corners of the block and then join these together with the white rectangles.

Each corner has a simple nine patch placement.  In the bottom right there is a four patch unit of red and blue squares with the blue squares following the diagonal from bottom right to top left.  The final square along that diagonal is a white square.  Place a blue/white half square triangle on either side of the white corner with the two blue triangles forming a butterfly shape across the corner.

In the remaining two spaces place red/white half square triangle units.  Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.  Make four of these corner blocks.

Old fashioned quilt block layout

Old fashioned quilt block layout

Assemble the old fashioned quilt block

Lay the corners out with a white rectangle between each pair of corners and a blue square in the middle.

You have three distinct rows now.  Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.

Basic quilt idea

Basic quilt idea

Quilt Ideas

For a basic quilt idea I have just shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.  This gives a very different quilt from what the individual blocks might suggest.

Alternate quilt idea

Alternate quilt idea

In order to showcase the blocks better, I then tried using an alternate block made using red and blue half square triangles sewn using 7.7/8″ squares.  I felt that this preserved the design of the quilt block a bit better.

In this case I have used just nine blocks total – five of the old fashioned quilt block and four of the alternate block.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Here’s the video:

California Chimney Quilt Block Pattern

California chimney quilt block

California chimney quilt block

The California Chimney quilt block is a delight – easy to make and using three different shades of blue with white.  It is classified as a five patch block and I have made it here as an 18″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the California chimney quilt block

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  four white, two medium blue

3.1/2″ squares:  four white, four medium blue

3.7/8″ squares:  two each in light blue and white, two each in light blue and dark blue, four each in light blue and medium blue




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units in the colour combinations listed above.  Place two squares with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the darker fabric and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the central section

Central section

Central section

I’m showing the central area first.  This is a more simple way of seeing the layout and all the half square triangles are used up in this section.

Place the four dark blue/light blue half square triangles in the middle.  Make sure that the dark blue triangles form a diamond in the middle of the block.

On each edge of this central area place two medium blue/light blue half square triangles.  Make sure that the medium blue triangles form a larger triangle pointing towards the middle.  In each corner of this section place a light blue/white half square triangle with the white on the outside, forming the corner of the section.

Full layout

Full layout

California chimney quilt block full layout

For the full layout you now need to add just one more frame.  The top and bottom rows are made with a 6.1/2″ medium blue rectangle in the middle and a white rectangle on either side.

For the sides, place two medium blue squares in the middle of each edge with a white square on either side.

I have chosen to use rectangles in the top and bottom rows but pairs of squares down the sides purely to simplify the sewing.  This way it is straightforward now to sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.

Basic California chimney quilt

Basic California chimney quilt

California chimney quilt ideas

For the basic quilt design I have shown nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.

With added green

With added green

As an alternate design I have simply added one green square in one corner of each block.  I was quite surprised at how much difference this made to the overall look of the quilt.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Oklahoma Twister Quilt Block Pattern

Oklahoma Twister quilt block

Oklahoma Twister quilt block

I have made the Oklahoma Twister quilt block before, but I managed to place one of the half square triangles wrong, so I am writing the pattern again.  This time with the triangles all correct, I hope!

In order to save time, I have also used white rectangles equivalent to either two or three white squares.  The block as I’ve made it is an 18″ square.

Cutting requirements for the Oklahoma Twister quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  six white

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  four white

3.1/2″ by 9.1/2″ rectangles:  two white

3.7/8″ squares:  eight red, eight white




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

The half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make the half square triangle units.  Place a red and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the red and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the Oklahoma Twister quilt block

Oklahoma Twister quilt block layout

Oklahoma Twister quilt block layout

Lay the patchwork pieces out in six rows.  It may look like a maze of half square triangles, but just take it slowly and look at small sections.

First of all, in the middle is a red/white pinwheel formed by four half square triangles.  From each blade of this pinwheel extends a white rosebud shape formed by a square and two triangles.  In the top left the rosebud is to the left of the pinwheel triangle while in the top right the pinwheel is above the pinwheel triangle.

Place the white rosebud to the right of the bottom right pinwheel triangle and beneath the bottom left corner of the pinwheel.

The 9.1/2″ white rectangles are placed in the top and bottom rows, while each of the other rows contains a 6.1/2″ white rectangle.

Sew the pieces together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.

Basic Oklahoma Twister quilt image

Basic Oklahoma Twister quilt image

Oklahoma Twister quilt ideas

For the basic quilt design, I have shown nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.  This gives quite a pleasant swirly look to the quilt.

Using blue in each block

Using blue in each block

For an alternate idea, I changed the white rosebud shapes to light blue and this changes the look to a distinctly floral effect.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Lincolns Platform Quilt Block

Lincolns Platform quilt block

Lincolns Platform quilt block

The Lincolns Platform quilt block is usually made in red and white, but I’ve chosen to make it here in red and yellow.  I’ve made it as a 14″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the Lincolns Platform quilt block

4.7/8″ squares:  two red, two yellow

2.1/2″ squares:  thirteen yellow, eight red

6.1/2″ by 2.1/2″ rectangles:  four red




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangles

Use the 4.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a red and a yellow square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.

Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line to produce two half square triangle units.  Press the seam allowances towards the red and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the corners of the block

Make the corners separately

Make the corners separately

Sew the four corners of the block first – this is by far the most simple way to make the block.

Place a half square triangle with the yellow triangle on the bottom right.  Across the top place a red and a yellow square.  Down the left hand side place three squares:  yellow, red, yellow.

Make two columns

Make two columns

Sew the two top squares to each other and then sew them to the top of the half square triangle.

Join the three squares down the side to make a column.  Sew the two columns to each other.  This forms one corner of the block so you need to make four of these altogether.

Lincolns platform quilt block layout

Lincolns platform quilt block layout

Assemble the Lincolns Platform quilt block

Lay the corners out as shown.  Note that the corners are rotated so that the yellow triangle is always nearest the middle and there is always a yellow square in the corner.

Place a red rectangle between each pair of corners and a yellow square in the middle of the block.

Sew the pieces together across each of the three rows and then sew the rows to each other to complete the Lincolns Platform quilt block.

Basic Lincolns Platform quilt image

Basic Lincolns Platform quilt image

Quilt design ideas

For the basic quilt I have shown nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.  Quite interesting the way you get a shoofly type design appearing where the blocks join together.

Using an alternate block

Using an alternate block

For an alternative design idea, I have made four alternate blocks of a diamond in a square and placed these in the corners.  This is also quite an interesting design, I think.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Chisholm Trail Quilt Block Pattern

Chisholm Trail quilt block

Chisholm Trail quilt block

The Chisholm Trail quilt block is a really simple block that makes up nicely in red, blue and white.  It’s classified as a four patch block and I’ve made it here as a 12″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the Chisholm Trail quilt block

3.7/8″ squares:  seven red, seven white

3.1/2″ squares:  two blue




Make the half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a red and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This will give you two half square triangle units.  They are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the red and trim the two corners where the fabric sticks out.

Make the Chisholm Trail quilt block

Chisholm Trail quilt block layout

Chisholm Trail quilt block layout

Lay the squares out in four rows of four.  Make a four patch unit in the middle with two blue squares and two red/white half square triangle units.  Place these so that the red triangles form a butterfly shape in the middle of the block.

In each corner of the block place a half square triangle with the red on the outside.  Between each pair of corners place a pair of half square triangles, laying them so that the white triangles together form a larger white triangle pointing in towards the middle.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the block.

Basic Chisholm Trail quilt idea

Basic Chisholm Trail quilt idea

Chisholm Trail quilt ideas

For the basic quilt idea I have shown sixteen blocks sewn together in four rows of four.  The red seems to form grid lines along the diagonals which is quite attractive.

Same quilt with some rotations

Same quilt with some rotations

In the second idea, there may not seem to be much of a change, but there are a lot more secondary designs showing up.  All I have changed is the rotation of the blocks.  If you concentrate on the direction of the blue squares, you’ll see that I have rotated half the blocks.  This gives an impression of diamonds rather than the grid lines in the first quilt which I found far more pleasing.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Double Star Quilt Block Pattern

Double star quilt block

Double star quilt block

The double star quilt block is surprisingly easy to make – only two colours and it’s made from squares, rectangles and half square triangles only.  It is a big block, though.  I have made it here as a 30″ square finished size, but you could make it as a 20″ square using 2.1/2″ and 2.7/8″ squares instead.  In the size that I have made it, it just needs a few borders to become a lap quilt or a Linus quilt.

Cutting requirements for the double star quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  twelve white

3.7/8″ squares:  twenty red, twenty white

3.1/2″ by 6.1/2″ rectangles:  six red

9.1/2″ squares:  four white




Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Make the half square triangles

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a red and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will produce two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the red and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Make the central star block

Central star layout

Central star layout

Lay the squares out in four rows of four.

Place two rectangles in the middle with a pair of half square triangles on each edge.  Lay the half square triangles so that the white triangles lie together, forming a larger white triangle pointing towards the rectangles.

Add a 3.1/2″ white square in each corner.

Sew the rows together

Sew the rows together

Sew the squares together across the top and bottom rows.  For the middle row you need to sew the two half square triangles together first and then you can sew the pieces together across the row.

Sew the three rows to each other.

Part star layout

Part star layout

Make the part star sections

The parts stars are obviously very similar to the full star block.  Lay the pieces out in three rows of four, using just one rectangle rather than the two used in the full star block.  Arrange the half square triangles in pairs around the rectangle.  Note that there are white squares in the first row only.

Sew the rows to each other

Sew the rows to each other

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows together.

You need to make four of these part star blocks.

Double star quilt block layout

Double star quilt block layout

Assemble the double star quilt block

This last bit is easy:  lay the blocks out in three rows of three.  Place a 9,1/2″ white square in each corner with the full star in the middle.  Lay one part star on each edge of the central star.  Rotate them so that the white corners are always on the outside.

Sew the blocks together across each row.  Note that the rows are different heights:  the first and third rows are 9.1/2″ high while the second row is 12.1/2″ high.  Sew the rows to each other to complete the quilt block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Double star quilt suggestions

When the block has been made this large, it doesn’t need much to make it into a quilt.  For my first quilt suggestion I have just added three borders to the block.

The first and third borders are 3″ wide while the middle border is 1″ wide.

Alternate quilt design

Alternate quilt design

As an alternative I have added large half square triangles around the block to give it more of a frame.

These half square triangle units are made from both 4.7/8″ and 9.7/8″ squares.

Here’s the video:

Starry Path Quilt Block Pattern

Starry path quilt block

Starry path quilt block

The Starry Path quilt block should be simple to make – it’s made entirely with squares, rectangles and half square triangles.  However I ended up unpicking several times because it’s terribly easy to place the half square triangles incorrectly.

I’ve made it here as a big block (24″ square finished size), so that I can use it as the basis for a Linus quilt by adding a few borders to it.

Cutting requirements for the starry path quilt block

3.7/8″ squares:  seventeen blue, seventeen white

3.1/2″ squares:  two blue, six white

6.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  two white, two blue

9.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  two white

15.1/2″ by 3.1/2″ rectangles:  two blue




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangle units.  Place a blue and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.

This produces two half square triangle units which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the blue fabric and trim the two seams where the fabric sticks out.

Top four rows

Top four rows

The first four rows of the block

I am showing the layout in pairs of rows to make it easier to see how the block goes together.  It can become a bit of a blur of half square triangles otherwise.  Look for the larger shapes to help you place the triangles.  There’s an egg timer shape formed by four half square triangles at the end of the first pair of rows.  This shape is repeated two squares before the end of the second pair of rows.  Note the progression of the white on the left hand side of the rows:  a triangle in the first row, a square and a triangle in the second row, a 6.1/2″ strip and a triangle in the third row with a 9.1/2″ white strip plus triangle in the fourth row.

I found it easiest to sew the squares together across each of these rows and sew the rows together first before continuing with the bottom half of the starry path quilt block.

The lower 4 rows

The lower 4 rows

The lower four rows

Once again, look for the larger shapes.  The egg timer shape continues down the diagonal, appearing two squares before the beginning of the fifth and sixth rows and then in the bottom left hand corner.  Note that along the other diagonal the blue is now appearing below the diagonal whereas it had been above the diagonal in the top half of the block.

I also found it helped to check the length of each row as I laid them out.  When you have strips of so many different lengths it’s possible to leave a square out without realising that you have.

Finally, sew the squares together across the rows and sew these rows to the top four rows.

Basic starry path quilt design

Basic starry path quilt design

Quilt designs

I’ve shown a basic quilt design using nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.

Quilt design with rotations

Quilt design with rotations

However when you start rotating the blocks, a very pleasing design shows up.  You’d need to make the blocks smaller to make this quilt – it would be a 16″ block if you used 2.1/2″ and 2.7/8″ squares to make it.

Here’s the video:

Jacks Delight Quilt Block Pattern

Jacks delight quilt block

Jacks delight quilt block

The Jacks Delight quilt block is made using a diagonal setting but as usual it isn’t too difficult if you take it in small stages.  I’ve made it here as an 18″ square finished size.

Cutting requirements for the Jacks Delight quilt block

5.3/8″ squares:  five brown, five white

6.7/8″ squares:  two white, cut along one diagonal

9″ square:  one brown




Make half square triangle units

Make half square triangle units

Make the half square triangle units

Use four each of the brown and white 5.3/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a brown and a white square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This will give you two half square triangle units which are now 5″ squares.  Press the seam allowances towards the brown and trim the two corners where fabric sticks out.

Jacks delight quilt block layout

Jacks delight quilt block layout

Make the Jacks delight quilt block

Place the 9″ brown square in the middle of the layout.  On each edge of the square place two half square triangle units.  These all have a white edge against the square, but check the photo to be sure of which way to lay the half square triangles.

The layut shown on the right shows the block as it will lookwhen finished, although the photo below shows the layout as it will be sewn.

View of the layout as it will be sewn

View of the layout as it will be sewn

Outside each pair of half square triangles place a white triangle formed by cutting a 6.7/8″ square along one diagonal.  These form the corners of the quilt block.

Sew the patchwork pieces together in rows

Sew the pieces together across the rows

Sew the pieces together across the rows

Think of the block in terms of rows of patchwork pieces where the white triangle is the first and last row and the middle row has a white triangle at each end.

You should have two 5.3/8″ squares left – one brown and one white.  Cut them both along one diagonal.  In the second row place a white triangle at the beginning and a brown triangle at the end.

In the row above the bottom white triangle, place a brown triangle at the beginning of the row and a white triangle at the end.

For the middle section, sew the two half square triangles to each other vertically.  You will then be able to sew the white triangles, half square triangles and central square together in one row.

When you have sewn the pieces together into three rows, sew the rows to each other to complete the Jacks delight quilt block.

Basic quilt design

Basic quilt design

Jacks delight quilt ideas

I have shown a basic quilt using nine blocks sewn together in three rows of three.

Alternate quilt idea

Alternate quilt idea

Just for interest, I then tried changing the colour in some of the blocks.

I think this second option gives a more interesting quilt.

Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I look forward to seeing you again.

Rose

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